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Dutch Passion

Support forum for Dutch Passion Seeds


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  • Posts

    • Owderb
      Adults and pupae overwinter in garden soil. In spring, newly emerged females insert eggs into the tissues of flowers, leaves or stems. (They do not need to mate for reproduction.) Each female can produce up to 80 eggs, which hatch within days in warm weather or weeks to months in colder weather. They become wingless larvae (nymphs), which feed on plant sap. After two or more nymphal stages, many thrips drop to the soil to pupate. Emerging adults fly to the plant and repeat the cycle. There may be 12-15 generations per year with the entire cycle from egg to adult requiring less than 16 days in warm weather. Control Thrip management is a matter of garden maintenance — reducing the places where thrips may breed — and requires removing plant debris while it’s still on the ground and green. Thrips lay their eggs in slits they cut in live plant stems. Vigilance — spotting problems early and responding to them — is also required. Check your plants for damage and clusters of the pests at the place where leaves are attached to stems.   Owd
    • nl5
      Thanks owd
    • Owderb
      Thrips cut a slit and lay the egg inside the leaf, stem, or even the flower itself.    Owd
    • golf.007
      @Marthur Ix, good to see you posting again dude,    Hope your well, I  have missed your posts.