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Captain Bonglington

Some things I've made from wood.

94 posts in this topic

Here's my latest project-a reclaimed Oak coffee table on a copper and brass frame. 

I'm pleased with this. :yes:

it's not taken me too long either, a week or so of doing a bit after work, probably 12 hours or so in total.

I've no before pics of the timber as the camera battery was dead and i wanted to crack on with it....

There's a bit of investment in this, at least £100 of materials, the timber was 40 quid (even though it was about to be chopped up for firewood :eek: ) and the rest is in the copper pipe and attachments, as well as sanding discs, oil, wax and a pipe cutter.:)

It's been a bit more of an advanced project for me this, it needed a bit more emphasis on getting everything as accurate as possible, and the metalwork was a little outside my usual comfort zone, but it wasn't too difficult, i just had to use a tape measure for once. lol

 

large.5a5b9a540b326_oakandcopper5.JPG

The black staining you can see in the pic above, bottom left, is most likely where some metal has been present in the tree over the course of it's life.

large.5a5b9a4f2fa23_oakandcopper4.JPG

 

large.5a5b9a48a693d_Oakandcoppertable2.JPG

 

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I forgot to do a close up of the feet, but the caps will unscrew, giving a few mm of adjustment for uneven floors if necessary. 

large.5a5b9a3dd0137_Oakandcoppertable.JPG

 

It's been a fun build, I'm going to build a couple more variations on it in the future for sure. :yep:

Edited by Captain Bonglington
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Top work @Captain Bonglington  That's proper mate. You should be well chuffed!!.

 

You'll get good money for that in the right place too.

 

 

 

 

Gonna be honest and say i dont like the copper legs  :moptop: But i do like the idea.

 

Can you speed up the ageing process of copper? It's gonna tarnish quite quick. Either distress it now, or get out ya brasso :wassnnme:

 

Sorry mate, trying to be constructive :doh:

 

 

 

 

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20 hours ago, tigseyjnr said:

 

Gonna be honest and say i dont like the copper legs  :moptop: But i do like the idea.

 

Can you speed up the ageing process of copper? It's gonna tarnish quite quick. Either distress it now, or get out ya brasso :wassnnme:

 

Sorry mate, trying to be constructive :doh:

Cheers Tigs. :yep:

 

No need to be sorry, constructive criticism is welcome!

 It's good to hear people's opinions, a bit of feedback is helpful.:yes:

 

Do you think it would've looked better with chrome plate pipework?

That's what I was going to do originally, but cost was a factor, and I thought it might look a bit like it belonged in a hospital....lol

 

I'm thinking Brasso rather than distressing it, I reckon if I put a blowtorch on it I'd get an interesting effect, but I think it suits a clean look....:unsure:

Edited by Captain Bonglington
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Nice one, I knew you'd take it the right way. 

 

Couldnt help but but worry a little bit over night though :unsure:

 

lol

 

 

 

If you're keeping it for yourself, i agree. Brasso it up :yep:

 

 

I was actually thinking of you selling it in the future. 

 

 Unless they (customer) are willing to polish it, or understands how it will change/tarnish, it changes things. You need to explain that clearly at pos, otherwise dumbasses will come back in a months time wondering why it's not shiney anymore :doh:

 

 

I probably wouldn't like the chrome either lol

 

I'm a tight wadded, hording, rusty thing loving, gypsy type. I'd never use new fixings on something like that. Old ones, maybe. 

 

A nice, funky bit of bone oak would compliment the sharpness of the lid. 

 

Bare in mind where I've been living the last few years. 

 

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Forgot to say.. Look up heat treating copper. Some beautiful colours and effects to be had. 

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Aye, I'd thought about if and when I sell these pieces I'd have to knock up a little care instruction manual, and a disclaimer almost, that states as a natural product you may see some movement in the wood, etc..... It should be regarded as part of the character of the piece rather than a fault.....It's not from Ikea....lol

As you say, I don't want folk ringing me up saying a small split has appeared or whatever... I try and use stable timber where possible, but as I'm sure you know, if you bring a piece of wood indoors that's spent it's whole life outdoors, then stick it by the fire or radiator, despite being oiled, and/or waxed, it might move a bit....same as the metalwork, it will need a regular polish ....:yep:

Not sure if you saw my edit about sticking a blowtorch on the copper, but yeah, I can see some colours on the copper looking really cool....:yes:

Honestly, feedback like yours brings new ideas mate, and reinforces thoughts and concerns of mine, so it's really helpful and much appreciated! :yep:

Edited by Captain Bonglington
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@Captain Bonglington

I missed the blow torch bit. And I'm with you on the clean look. 

 

(I chuckled to myself while rereading this next bit. Really not trying to be mean lol ).

 

I just think asking someone to polish those legs regularly is a bit much lol 

 

 they are just copper pipes and cast brass fixings at the end of the day. 

 

 

If they were already distressed, they become a feature.

 

At the moment they're novel.

 

In the future will look like old boiler pipes. Especially once they're faded and dusty. 

 

The thing is, wood looks lush when it ages and cracks. Copper looks a bit crap.

 

 

 

But I do really like it dude!!! I would happily put it in my house. And I'd polish the fecking legs. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For at least a week :nenenenene:

 

 

lol

 

 

 

 

If our paths ever cross mate, I owe you a beer  :yep:

 

Edited by tigseyjnr
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I'm distressed now.....:(   lol

 

Just kidding....I dunno, I think you've got to maintain any piece of furniture, run a duster over it or whatever....

 

Mind you, a quick look over my place would tell you that doesn't always happen....lol

 

Point taken though, like I said, I appreciate your input. :yep:

 

I think I'll leave this piece as it is, but, I will invest in a blowtorch and see what it does, as it could look really cool. :yes:

 

Mine's a pint of whatever the most expensive beer on tap is in yer local.....:nenenenene:

 

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You've a great pair of hands and a creative head . 

 

In my shed I have hoarded lumps of cherry ,laburnum ,yew ,mountain ash and a few pieces of spalted beech . I didn't know ,nor did it occur to me that lumps would split upwards unless they're struck or cut slightly to allow for cracking and prevent it happening naturally . I've been looking at it for so long ,and it was hard work cutting ,loading and rolling butts of trees . I'd give you the timber ,except you're pretty far away ! 

Edited by Michael Luchóg
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Been gathering a couple bits n pieces of tools here n there n I'll be grabbing a lot more lumber this year, still aint ready yet but I'm getting close to a number of projects getting thrown together.

Just been reading up on bending lately n will get on building up that part of the shop this year for sure too.

Slow build with everything else there is to get into, and the inevitable need for the proper tools to do so with, but eventually when you got all the shit you need, not much else to do but get shit done using it all. :)

Considering with wood you can go at a scale from veneers all the way up to timber or log framings n what not, there's plenty of variety in what 1 can choose to do with it or themselves.

Good luck with the projects fellas, n have fun. :)

 

Oh, n where are the metal work n masonry threads? ;)lol

 

cheers,..............................................gps

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22 hours ago, Michael Luchóg said:

You've a great pair of hands and a creative head . 

 

In my shed I have hoarded lumps of cherry ,laburnum ,yew ,mountain ash and a few pieces of spalted beech .

Thanks for your kind words mate. :yep:

I really like Laburnum, the graining and colours are stunning....I'm waiting for the day I fell a decent sized specimen that I can take a couple of planks from......:yes:

It's difficult to stop cut timber from splitting, it's one of the reasons I buy timber to work on.

If you have a green piece, ideally you'd plank it, wax the end grain, then stack it on stickers (bearers between each plank), and dry slowly, outdoors in a barn or outhouse.

There must be something salvageable in there though mate, don't give up on it, it sounds like you've a nice collection of timber. :yes:

Sounds like you're a man with a plan @Gram Paw smurf....:yes:

Edited by Captain Bonglington
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Little tip on splitting I've recently learned from the benders is painting some paraffin wax on end cuts to seal the moisture in, n also just wrapping in plastic sheeting or tarping for outdoor storage will help with a slower more comfortable acclimation n seasoning a lot like curing good bud in the jars ;)

Just received some literature on veneering today actually n it's gonna be a great help moving forward with all sorts of projects I've got planned n even just in understanding the wood a little better at a different scale, a lot like bending there's a bigger emphasis on the actual cellular structuring of the wood itself and how it can handle different things and be handled, even just selection of materials can be such a big part of something being mediocre or being something a little more refined n elegant either in appearance or even just when being physically worked.

Than I bounce to timber joinery n thoughts of refacing my garage in a Tudor style so I can work a stone n timber framed forge and modular work space for using year round once it's getting warm enough. :)lol

Love natural materials, so easily available, the right tools at hand n not a soul is needed to go ahead n start building buildings.

Land aint fuck all a cost when there's nothing on it, granted setting up utilities is always a bitch and costly but for something simple like a base camp for a chunk of land to play on on some water is perfect to have for hunting season for most around here but for me growing season n best work season for harvesting any lumber n shit any building etc.

Hell I'll prob have to eventually build myself a beach as rocky as terrain is around here but luckily thas an easy job n will be nearing the end of my journey of looking for shit to do, than it'll just be sit back n enjoy it.

Anywho, was just looking up power hammer plans but time to get back to things so have a good 1 fellas.

 

cheers,...............................................gps

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anyone read up on or tried any Japanese or Chinese joinery?

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fuckin stunning table ..well impressed with that and given me and idea so thank you .

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