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Comrade Stoker

Fermented Food Recipes and Techniques

333 posts in this topic

@TheByrds: Kimchi really can smell like something died after a while lol.

I cheat and buy it but it is nice with cubed if mooli or radish, they keep their crunch.

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I will be doing a Kimchi over the weekend, I will do a diary. I will be using Savoy cabbage.

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UK420 has gone all super healthy. Fermentation is good probiotics and also bioavailable nutes. I've got a jar of improvised Kimchi sitting in the fridge.

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I'd love to try my hand at some of this, I wish there was a thread on UK420 where people were sharing their recipes and techniques rather than just talking about what they have done or are going to do :wassnnme:

Edited by Mephitis
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Relax man, all good things to those who wait, we're working on it lol

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Reading about smoothies on here and friend who's mad for them has got me on them.So may be with the help off ms icki this could be the next step towards a healthy lifestyle.

Cool.

I suppose as i so fussy this stuff i could put in a smoothie but with the benefits of friendly bacteria is that right??

Edited by icki

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Right, to satisfy the demands some of the more petulent members lol here goes:

Straining some yoghurt to get whey and cream cheese:

Straining yoghurt for whey and cream cheese

Pour some yoghurt (I use a yoghurt from a local farm who use grass fed cows milk) into a large muslin cloth and hang it. It is important not to squeeze the cloth because the yoghurt will be squeezed through. All you are aiming at is draining the liquid (The water + culture) out of it. This will drip out over the space of 24 hours, you are then left with the culture in a bowl and the cream cheese in the muslin cloth.

Straining yoghurt for whey and cream cheese

Beet Kvass
This is my first attempt, so no idea of what it will be like. I chopped up 4 x beetroot. I gave them a little scrub to get most of the dirt off, though I did not peel or scrub too much. Chopped them up into lumps about 1 inch x 2 inch and put them in a 3 litre Kilner jar. I added 1.5 tablespoon of decent sea salt and filled the jar with filtered water. I then added about 1/5 of a cup of sauerkraut juice and all of the culture/whey from one pot of yoghurt:

Beet Kvass plus other ferments

Edited by Comrade Stoker
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This thread now rocks ^^^

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Bought some yoghurt...re-read the recipe...now I need sauerkraut juice :blub:

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No, you can use the yoghurt starter (Assuming you are making Beet Kvass?)

There are other methods of Beet Kvass, some simply rely on the lacto bacteria on the skin on the beetroot. I am assuming its from your own land Meph yes? In that case, you might want to wing it with the beet on its own. I will copy and paste some other methods for Beet Kvass. I cannot vouch for them, but the principal makes sense with all of them, either use a starter or work with the bacteria on the beetroot.

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What is Beet Kvass?

Here in my kitchen, we call it blood of the earth. Indeed I do taste the earth when I sip this crimson liquid. Beet Kvass is an age-old tonic associated with many health benefits including efficient hydration. Fermented beverages are the original sports drinks. Like other lacto-fermented drinks, kvass is more hydrating than even water. In order to remain hydrated, our bodies require a balance of electrolytes. Cultured beverages like kvass help restore this balance without the sugar and preservatives of modern “sport drinks”.

Beet Kvass is traditionally heralded as a blood and liver tonic. And indeed this ancestral knowledge is meted out in science. In fact, beets are high in betacyanin which can dramatically increase the oxygen-carrying ability of the blood.

Personally, beet kvass gives me a feeling of energy and clarity. I LOVE beets and the taste of beet kvass. If you don’t love the taste but do want the health benefits of this tonic, try adding it to a soup when serving or use it to make a virgin ‘dirty martini’ or ‘bloody mary’. The taste is perfect for these concoctions and a big hit at any dinner party I’ve ever had.

KvassMartini-964x1024.jpg

Beet Kvass Ingredients

  • Filtered water
  • 3-4 beets
  • 1 ½ tablespoon unrefined sea salt

Beet Kvass Method

  1. Wash the beets of any dirt but, do not scrub or peel the beets. Our aim is to keep the delicate bacteria on the skin of the beets in tact so that we can encourage their multiplication during fermentation.
  2. Chop the beets. I like a medium dice.
  3. Add the beets to a 1-gallon jar.*
  4. Add 1 ½ tablespoon unrefined sea salt
  5. Add filtered water to ½ inch below lid
  6. Affix lid tightly and label with date.
  7. Allow to ferment for 1 ½ weeks or more out of direct sunlight.
  8. You may strain through a cheese-cloth and decant into smaller containers, taking care to redistribute a handful of beet pieces into each bottle and then store in the refrigerator. Or feel free to store in the refrigerator as is.

Chef Notes:

*If you have difficulty successfully using wild fermentation methods in your environment/home, consider using a jug with an airlock affixed to the top to ferment beet kvass. This will mitigate the introduction of funky yeasts from your environment making a film on top of your fermenting kvass.

http://holisticsquid.com/beet-kvass-myth-busting/

Edited by Comrade Stoker
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I will be trying that version next week. This fermenting lark plays beautifully into my compulsion to buy Kilner jars, I can't fucking help it, if I see a Kilner jar at a decent price, I have to buy it, I can't walk away from it. TK Maxx and whenever the supermarkets do offers on them, I'm like a fucking addict, I have to have them.

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Yoghurt Culture from chilli stems

I've been looking into various yoghurt starters and I'm not keen on buying one from Lakeland, or using another yoghurt, I'd rather try and get one from elsewhere. I had planned on using a load of chilli stems, but my missus threw them out. I will source more chillies next week and give it a go. The research I did around the various fermented food forums suggested that a starter made in this way would last for lots of batches.

Here is a post from another forum. You need to cut the stem off the chilli, not the pentagon shape thing in the end of the chilli. I'd recommend only using a known source of chillies, I don't really trust the supermarket sources, though others may disagree.

Just place the stems of several chili peppers into milk that has been heated to at least 160° F for 10 min or more (pasteurization temperature) and then keep warm (85° to 105°) until it has set up. The first batch will of course have a spicy taste to it, but subsequent generations will lose that spiciness.

Once you have a batch, you can use a dollop of that for the next batch.

Here's another post from another forum:

I've been wanting to try this for some time. Using a commercial yogurt as a starter is fine but the subsequent generations are much weaker than the original. Ditto for the powdered probiotics. I rarely get more than a generation or two from either.

There's very little on the 'net about your own starter (as compared to creating your own sourdough starter). I came across 2 options: the chili pepper stems and ant eggs. I figured the ant eggs would be difficult to differentiate from dirt, so pepper stems it was.

I did the usual heat milk to 180 and cool to the incubation range. Then I added the stems and incubated for 24 hours.

The results was a very firm yogurt that didn't pour. Usually when the yogurt is still warm, it will pour.

I'm refrigerating it now and will taste it once it's cold. It smells fine and looks good.

If the rather meagre postings I have read about this are true, this should produce a mother starter.

Pics here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/marypatc...

I will do a diary next week.
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The fermented carrots are the cats nuts. Just to recap the recipe from the sauerkraut thread....

Grate a load of decent carrots up, slice a few decent cloves of garlic nice and thin.

Lay garlic in bottom of Kilner jar, add the carrots. Fill with a brine made up of 2 mugs of filtered water with 5g of decent sea salt in each mug (i.e. 10g per 2 mugs of water). Use a cabbage leaf on top of the carrots and a jar of water (Small jam jar sort of thing, sterilised with hot water). I left mine to ferment for 9 days before fridging it. Its proper nice, crunchy with a lovely semi pickled taste. Its very lively, I had to burp it every day and some days it was proper gassy.

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I can totally recommend Beet Kvass if anybody is thinking of brewing some up, its lovely. As you can see, we drink ours in a Champagne glass so we can pretend we're having a celebration, its like party time round at ours since we stopped drinking lol

The fermented chilli sauce is very nice, its bubbling nicely so I transferred to a bottle and into the fridge.

I've been doing some more reading on Beetroots and Beet Kvass and it seems like a great thing to get into your diet, its very hydrating and its very nutritious.

Beet Kvass and fermented chilli sauce

Edited by Comrade Stoker
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