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pepe16

Peat compost to be banned from 2024

125 posts in this topic


I'm sure the organic guys are for it and will find a way around it with something else.

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long loooong overdue. there is no justification for peat imo, when the environmental consequences are so high

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Posted (edited)

I'm not really into gardening, are peat free composts as shit with other plants as they are with cannabis? 

 

I know it had to happen, probably a long time ago in fact. I'll have to go hydro :(

Edited by KC
Predictive
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Just seen this on the news. I didn't know it absorbed so much carbon.

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Posted (edited)

To think back in the mid-late80's farmers were paid grants to drain bog land and rip hedges out for bigger fields ,more useable land, now they get/got grants to re -hedge with a wildlife border afaik , and now bogs i guess , Why the f**k did they not think ahead those few years ago?:wallbash:

Edited by Personunknown
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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, KC said:

I'm not really into gardening, are peat free composts as shit with other plants as they are with cannabis? 

 

I know it had to happen, probably a long time ago in fact. I'll have to go hydro :(

i have never used peat personally, done 7 seasons w/ soil over last 20 years with no issue - good compost will do the job nicely (or nutes if thats your pref, monitor as usual)

Edited by beep
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I've been using Light-Mix (peat & perlite) for years and to be honest I don't want to change.

I am all for sustainability thou so I guess I will just have to move with the times.

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yeah I am torn on this one, I can understand the damage that removing peat can cause but I love it for my plants. I don't know what I am going to do in the future. Hopefully, smarter people on here will figure it out and then I can just copy them :rofl:

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I just took delivery of my first bag of coco.

Up to now I've been using All-Mix and last year I found I can get Clover at a local nursery.

I've been driving past for a while, umming and erring, debating with myself whether to grab another bag or try switching.

Sustainability wasn't the only deciding factor but it was right up there.

Coco hempys next run!

 

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Coco for the win :toldya:

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I have avoided using peat whenever possible for as long as I've been growing. Why are people so averse to loam based compost? Probably because it weighs more and they don't like lugging big sacks of it around, and they think their roots won't do so well in a dense heavy medium : most of the world is covered in loam soil, not peaty stuff, and weed and everything else grows in it just fine.

I have to concede I haven't done this myself but I suspect that if we were to try comparative side-by-side grows of our favourite peat mediums next to a plant in neat John Innes No. 3 we would be pleasantly surprised at the results. Peat has no nutes and is not the habitat of choice of the fungi and bugs and it's acid as fuck, coir isn't really much better. 

 

Why not bite the bullet and go back to good old loam, we could be doing our plants a favour.

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You know I didn't realise JI no3 was loam based. I used it once in one of my big pots (maybe 20/25 ltr). That will be why it was so heavy then, thinking back it was very sandy. I'd just had a back operation, probably wasn't the best choice at the time, but if i recall correct the plant did ok.

 

It does set like concrete lol 

 

 

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It's got loads of sand in it and these days I would find it a ballache dragging sacks of it around , but I used it all the time for weed when I started. I used to mix in some leaf mould off my allotment, it's a good structure improver and not a natural vector for pests and diseases.

It's only since peat and coir  overwhelmed the market that mycorrhizal granules  and the other soil life additives have taken off, they could drastically improve, and it did OK for me too. 

 

Might get a small bag in and run that experiment against the Growell Tropic Mix I'm using at the moment, with inoculants this time. 

 

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for organic - mix of ericaceous (acidic) compost, coir, perlite, plus whatever feed you like to use (my pref was fish meal, epsom, etc etc - you can find recipes online specific to weed - with a good compost, micro/macro nutes should be good balance, but keep an eye on plants to be sure) - or you can use an acidic soil mix without compost and use nute liquids; i pref organic, at most i added a little extra fish bone during late stage flowering

 

keep an eye on pH of water you use; i use rain water wherever pos and never had to adjust pH of the soil, if i was using southern English tap water i'd consider pH adjustments coz its hard as hell - but with a good organic base soil/compost, the bacteria in it should control pH and reduce risk of nutrient lockout very effectively without any intervention - liquid nutes have the potential to disrupt bacterial balance if you over do it, risk is lower with soil imo, just keep an eye as you normally would

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