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bobbles

Bread making in UK

97 posts in this topic

@ratdog

I'll be doing a wholemeal in 2 or 3 days. I'll have stab at pics and text as I'm doing it. I'll let you know when I've got it together.

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Thanks mate :)

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@ratdog

We've got some sons coming over tomorrow and the gaffer wants a cob loaf.

I'm therefore going to attempt a pics and text thing to show what I do (there are many variations but this one is fairly simple). Its not a wholemeal loaf I know, but the methods the same for both bakes. I'll give the ingredients for a basic wholemeal loaf in a following post, (as I think this one's going to be quite long).

 

So ... firstly make sure you have the following equipment.

 

large.Equipment.jpg

 

2 bowls, jug, spoon, brush, scales, timer and baking tray

Prepare one bowl by brushing the inside with a very light coat of oil (to stop dough sticking to it later)

 

Next , - the ingredients

 

large.Materials.jpg

 

Flour    500g

Salt      10g

Water   300ml

Butter   40g

Yeast    1 lvl tbsp.

(and oil which was used above to line a bowl).

 

I start by getting the yeast going. (I use a dried active yeast but there's lots of other options). Follow the instruction on the pack and you should end up with something like this ;-

 

large.59b4010a500fe_Provenyeast.jpg

 

Once you've got that started, mix your ingredients in the other bowl. NB. measure the ingredients fairly accurately until you are confident enough to wing it.

Add the salt to the flour and mix, then add the butter. 'Chip' the butter into small bits - it makes it easier to mix into the flour. Once mixed together, add the yeast in phases. Make a well and pour in say half your mix. Squeeze and mix with your hands until the yeast is absorbed, then add some more. keep going until all the yeast is used up.

You know you've got a good consistency if you can 'clean' the inside of the bowl with the dough.

 

large.59b4010e744fc_Mixingredients.jpg

 

Turn the dough out on to a clean surface lightly dusted with flour (to stop the dough from sticking), then start kneading. You knead by holding one end of your dough with one hand and pushing the rest of it away with the other, then rolling the dough back up into a lump. Repeat this action, turning the dough around to ensure you are stretching all of it during the process. It takes me around ten minutes to reach a point where I'm happy with the dough but a beginner might take a bit longer.

 

large.59b40113390d7_Kneadthedough.jpg

 

A kneaded lump of dough looks something like this

large.59b40116e28a9_Kneadeddough.jpg

 

Once you have got the dough smooth, soft and flexible, roll it into a lump and put it in the previously oiled bowl to 'prove' (expand). Cover the bowl with a towel (to stop the skin drying) and leave for 40 - 60 minutes or until the dough has about doubled in size.

 ... Like this

 

large.59b4011e6fc11_Risendough.jpg

 

Once doubled in size, tip it out on to a surface dusted lightly with flour and flatten using your fist.

 

large.59b401249ea97_Flattendoughwithfist.jpg

 

Once flattened, fold one third of it over towards the middle and then fold the remaining third over that. Pick the dough up and turn it 90 degrees and flatten again. Repeat this process three times. This 'shaping' of the bread helps to regularise the air bubbles or 'matrix' of the crumb (the white bit of the bread). You pick the bread up each time to stop the dough sticking to the surface.

 

large.59b401287f8b6_Foldflatteneddough.jpg

 

This is me trying to fold the dough one handed (the other hand is trying to take pictures).

 

Form your dough into a ball and place on a baking tray.

 

large.59b4012d26aa8_Shapeddough.jpg

 

Cover with a towel (as above) and allow to double in size (around 40 - 60 minutes). Turn your oven on to reach Gas mark 7 while this second 'proving' is under way. Once the loaf has reach the required size it will need to go into the oven. (If you have to hang about too long waiting for the oven to reach temperature your dough could over-expand and so collapse)

 

large.59b401836cb72_Readyfortheoven.jpg

 

Once doubled in size, slash the surface with a pattern. This slashing process is needed to aid expansion and the pattern helps determine the shape of the finished loaf. For a cob, I tend to do a few cuts up and down. (See finished loaf below) When cutting, draw a sharp knife across the surface. Do not press 'downwards' as this will squash the loaf. I like to sprinkle some flour over the surface of the dough just before I put it in the oven. Once ready, put dough into oven and leave for 30 minutes. I usually bake at gas mark 9 for the first 15 mins, then turn it down for the last 15. This makes the bread crustier (more burnt)

 

large.59b4018734fed_FinishedLoaf.jpg

 

 ... and something like this is what you are aiming at.

 

I hope I haven't missed anything vital out, but let me know if I have and more importantly, let me know how you get on.

 

Edited by bobbles
Forgot baking time
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@ratdog

Here are the ingredients for a basic wholemeal loaf;-

Wholemeal flour  500g

Salt                    10g

Water                 350ml

Yeast

 

The preparation is the same as above except for the following:-

Forget the bit about adding butter.

The kneading instructions should be, after mixing the ingredients, tip out onto a lightly floured surface and leave for 5 minutes. Then knead dough for 5 minutes, then leave for 2 minutes, mould into a ball and leave for a further 5 minutes.

Shape dough as above (i.e. flattening with fist etc.), place on a baking tray as above and slash dough as above.

The oven temperature should be gas mark 8 and the loaf baked for 30 minutes.

 

It doesn't take as long to make but as with all breads, once your reasonably comfortable making them , you can try all sorts of variables.

 

Hope this does it for you!

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That looks quite fool proof mate, thanks for taking the time to show us, I`ll have a go at making some tomorrow.

 

I`ve always wanted to have a crack but haven`t quite felt the confidence, this looks like just the ticket to guide me through, thanks again bobbles, love the name btw lol

 

e2a, Will rolls made the day before still be nice to eat the next day?, i.e. for work, I`m not getting up early to bake on a Monday, I draw the line there lol

Edited by ratdog
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@ratdog

Yes. Rolls are certainly good for a day or more in a decent bread bin, and I find a loaf still good after 3 days. After that I might toast it if there's any left

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@bobbles

 

I'm gonna use that guide myself and start baking my own bread too. Thanks for taking the time. One question though....is all the salt just for taste or does it aid the yeast or baking or something? I wouldn't usually eat that much salt in a month tbh, wondering if it could be left out or at least reduced? I like my food bland...like my personality lol

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@i11

 

Salt does aid the baking processes in a number of ways, (tightens gluten structure, adds strength to dough, slows down fermentation process [a good thing], and help the bread from going stale too quickly)

The norm for salt quantity is 1.8% to 2.2% of the flour content. (between 9 and 11 grams for a 500g loaf). Recent recommendations however have issued guideline of 1.5% to 1.6% of the weight of the finished loaf.

I haven't done the sums yet to see if it makes much difference but I suspect it doesn't.

Try 10 grams initially and see how you get on. Then reduce to 9 for the next one and see if you notice any difference.

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@bobbles Well you have changed my life mate, I didn`t think it was so easy! will be doing more of this.

 

thanks :)

 

large.bread.jpg

 

 

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@ratdog

That is fucking awesome. Congrats.

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Thanks mate, while I was shopping for ingredients this morning the shop I was in had a bread tin so I thought I`d get one, looks like it`s sandwiches for tea tonight!

 

 

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23 minutes ago, ratdog said:

I didn`t think it was so easy! will be doing more of this

 

That's good to hear, can you drop me a couple off for 0700 in the morning, save me going to Tescos.......:wassnnme:

 

Cheers bud......:yep:

 

(I've seen it, now I can bloody smell and taste it....:taz:...looks lush mate....)

 

:rofl:

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@ratdog

If you're going to make a white loaf, make sure you buy 'strong bread flour' not 'plain' flour. 

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12 minutes ago, stu914 said:

 

That's good to hear, can you drop me a couple off for 0700 in the morning, save me going to Tescos.......:wassnnme:

 

Cheers bud......:yep:

 

(I've seen it, now I can bloody smell and taste it....:taz:...looks lush mate....)

 

:rofl:

 

Well if I go by hourly rate, you are looking at about £30 a loaf plus materials mate lol

 

 

Just now, bobbles said:

@ratdog

If you're going to make a white loaf, make sure you buy 'strong bread flour' not 'plain' flour. 

 

 

Will do mate, nearly bought some as well to day, will be getting some for rolls in the week.

 

What`s the baking time for bread rolls mate?

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@ratdog

10 - 15 minutes depending on size.

Go for 12 minutes and see how they turn out.

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