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What Are You Reading At The Moment ?


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#16 Church

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 03:55 AM

Cue soundtrack from the Good the Bad and the Ugly.... :wassnnme:

My copy of Going Postal is signed, but my Mum got me it as a gift, and I doubt she queued personally for it!

As well as containing a fabulous tale, I also find the hardback editions particularly handy as a knee-based skinning up table when needed... probably intentional, cos Tezza is that good a bloke!!! :headpain: :guitar:
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#17 Pauls

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 07:28 AM

Hi Boojum

Have you read any Charlie Higson, he wrote four books a few years ago, very sick but very funny.

Getting rid of Mr Kitchen. Full whack. King of the ants. Happy now.

I couldnt put them down.

#18 _Blabblabberbab_

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 08:28 AM

Hi all - Read the Wasp factory last year and it's bloody brilliant! absolutley top read - then coincidentally I read Senior Vivo straight afterwards, what an absolute steaming pile of rancid diahorrea, utter utter shit made me very angry i read the bastard thing and it's making me angry again thinking about it now.

The last thing I finished has been Phillip Pullmans Dark Materials trilogy again, fantastic books! sits squarely between LOTR and Harry Potter (I've not read Potter tho - just not interested)

Been dipping into Charlie Broookers' TV go Home book again - well worth a giggle - him man funny.

I used to read a lot of Irvin Welsh books but bit bored of them now.

Oh yeah, and the hobbit - cant beat it!

#19 Twenty Three

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 08:55 AM

I love 'The Wasp Factory' as well...Bank's first,and imo best novel.I also liked his 'Espedair Street'('Two days ago I decided to kill myself...Last night I changed my mind and decided to stay alive.Everything that follows is...just to try and explain.') His 'The Crow Road' is also well woth reading ('It was the day my grandmother exploded.I sat in the crematorium,listening to my Uncle Hamish quietly snoring in harmony to Bach's Mass in B Minor,and I reflected that it always seemed to be death that drew me back to Gallanach.')


:headpain: Terry Pratchett..read most of the Discworld novels :ouch:

About 15 years ago,me and a mate went to listen to him give a talk at the invitation of the uni's literary society(Pratchett was invited that is,not me and my mate).The talk was very funny,but I found Pratchett's voice to be irritating and it took a while to get it out of my head whenever I subsequently read any of his work.

Anyhow,following the talk,me and my mate spotted Pratchett walking down the road.My mate was seriously looney tunes at the time(not so seriously now) and decided to stalk him.I tried to talk him out of it,but no..he wanted to follow Pratchett for a bit before approaching him and asking if he'd care for a 'smoke'.So I kept an eye on my mate as we followed Pratchett.This went on for a bit,before my mate suddenly dashes up to Terry and gives him a heck of a fright.

"I was just wondering if you'd like to share a spliff with us," said my mate.With a worried look on his face,Terry tried to force a kind of a smile but courteously declined and went on his way.I had to catch a bus,and my disappointed mate said he was off back home.

I later found out that my mate didn't go straight back to his place,but continued to follow Terry to his hotel.But after a few more attempts at getting stoned with Terry and a threat of police involvement,my mate did eventually go home.

I'll post about what I'm reading at the moment after brekky.
Yesterday is a memory. Tomorrow is the unknown. Now is the knowing. - Ven.Ajahn Sumedho

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#20 EnigmaticOne

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 08:58 AM

I am currently reading Gideon by Russel Adams. I am not doing very well with reading at the mo, I have got so much on my mind that I find myself going back and reading the previous page again, cos I cant remember reading it :headpain: The book is good, well if you consider I am almost halfway thru it and I don't have a clue what is going on..... and I don't mean like who did it I mean I don't have a clue what the book is about yet.... :ouch:

Before this book I read about 4 Kathy Reichs books. So I am sick of her for a minute. Her books are like Patricia Cornwell, in so far as the female lead is a forensic anthropologist, but Tempe Brennan is way more likeable than cornwells lead character.

I have Minette Walters, The Sculptress to read next.

Oh yeah and I have the Dandy and the Beano 2006 annuals in the bathroom, for those quiet moments alone. :hug:

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#21 little plonkie

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 09:09 AM

American scream - Bill Hicks life story


:headpain: just read that, its well good. i think i love Bill Hicks now, if that it at all possible. wish i could meet him........

read The God of Small Things recently, thats a beautiful book.

used to read the Beano :ouch:, thats funny, but funnier still is Calvin and Hobbs, that is the most jokes cartoon book, and its got jokes for all ages

#22 Twenty Three

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 09:14 AM

I am not doing very well with reading at the mo, I have got so much on my mind that I find myself going back and reading the previous page again, cos I cant remember reading it :headpain:


You're a Silly Jilly EO and only have yourself to blame,because you quite obviously have never paid attention to the warning once given by former B-Movie actor and onetime US president Ronald Reagan.

As anyone who watched 'Grass' last night will know,Ronald delivered a very strong and clear message that marijuana causes memory loss.He also said that....ermmm...what was I on about again ?..I've forgotten :ouch:
Yesterday is a memory. Tomorrow is the unknown. Now is the knowing. - Ven.Ajahn Sumedho

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#23 _fitduck_

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 09:17 AM

Not reading jack at the moment cos dont seem to have time. Still, the hours I waste on here could be put to better use :ouch:
Was recently given Vernon God Little, but aint been arsed to read it.
Most things by Paul Auster are good, Moon Palace being my favourite.

:headpain:

#24 _indica_

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 09:29 AM

1421 The Year China Discovered The World..

By
Gavin Menzies..

Very good Book!!!

Dont read many books but this one is very interesting!
Most reading is done on internet..

Fuzzy Thinking by Bart Kosko is a head scratcher.. :headpain: :ouch:

#25 _Lazlo Woodbine_

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 09:32 AM

Currently wading through Mr Robert Rankin's latest offering The Brightonomicon .....


It has to be said I'm struggling .... :ouch: - It's a sort of Prequel on the early adventures of Jim Pooley

- one half of the heroic - near legendry duo, who feature in the "Brentford Trilogy" (currently 7 volumes!)

4 weeks and i'm only on page 37 ... :hug: :headpain:



Laz

#26 grobag

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 09:58 AM

Bloody hell - good thread, up my alley this one.

Boojum - Terry is a Small God. I also understand where you are coming from with the likes of Lords and Ladies and The Hogfather. But his latter works are "just Terry - nothing special" IMO. But then I'm a fan of the Witches/Rincewind side. Oh and the Wee Free Men 'Nac McFeegle Swagging Moo Beasty'.
You also mention the Algebraist by Iain M Banks - bloody good but not about the culture.

Budbomber - You hit the nail on the head mate. The Wasp Factory is a classic. As are Whit, Crow Road, Complicity etc, etc. One can never be bored of Iain. Seen him giving a lecture at the Daphne Du Maurier Literary Festival - interesting chap - got me books signed :yinyang:
But it is you mentioning Tom Robbins that gets my attention. Bloody Brilliant! America's finest, barring Neal Stephenson. Still Life with Woodpecker is good, I'll give you that - but what about 'Skinny Legs and all' or 'Even Cowgirls get the Blues'. Not to mention one of my all time favourites 'JITTERBUG PERFUME'. Tom Robbins is a true genius of feeling, emotion and setting, not to mention deviationg from your standard seven basic plots! BOOJUM - You have got to read Skinny Legs and All, and Jitterbug Perfume - I guarantee you'll love them.

Blab m8. His Dark Materials is amazing eh? Based on Miltons Paradise Lost. Classic Kids book that. I love Harry Potter but I loved this more.

D'you get the feeling I read too much!

On to my recommendations not mentioned yet....

Neal Asher - anyone not heard of this amazing new British Sci-fi author? If you've not read (in chronological order) Gridlinked; The Skinner; Line of Polity; Cowl; Brass Man - then you are totally missing out. He releases a sequel to The Skinner called 'The Voyage of Sabel Keech' on Feb 17th and the Spatterjay saga continues. I have mine pre-ordered and paid for.

Neal Stephenson - again a demi-god (my ultimate favourite author just pipping Tolkien). The man writes all sorts. Starting with Sci-fi - Diamond Age (a young ladies primer); Snow Crash; Cryptonomicon (words can't describe the enormity of this one) - present age books like Zodiac and historical fiction like the ultimate trilogy - THE BAROQUE CYCLE (CLASSIC).

Finally I must mention China Mieville and the amazing Perdido Street Station, The Scar and The Iron Council. Brilliant works on the imaginary World of New Crobuzon. Excellent! Even his new short stories book 'Killing Jake' is excellent. (China by the way was once Labours youngest MP)!

Got to stop typing!

Gro.
I, as a responsible adult human being, will never concede the power to anyone to regulate my choice of what I put into my body, or where I go with my mind. From the skin inwards is my jurisdiction is it not? I choose what may or may not cross that border. - A Shulgin.
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#27 grobag

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 10:03 AM

Indica - that book by Menzies, 1421, is a cracker eh?
I, as a responsible adult human being, will never concede the power to anyone to regulate my choice of what I put into my body, or where I go with my mind. From the skin inwards is my jurisdiction is it not? I choose what may or may not cross that border. - A Shulgin.
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#28 Twenty Three

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 10:15 AM

I'm currently re-reading Mervyn Peake's fantastic 'Gormenghast Trilogy'.Peake has an incredible grasp and unique use of language,and although very much introspective in style,the sprawling castle of Gormenghast is a whole world in itself and described in vivid detail.This,along with brilliant characters,some of whom are truly bizarre have kept me coming back to this tale several times over the past 20 years.A must for anyone who loves dark,gothic fantasy.

I've also got "Bobby Fischer Goes to War" on the go..the story of Fischer's battle against Spassky in the World Chess Championship of 1972.

Ian Rankin's "Fleshmarket Alley" is next to be read.I'm a big fan of the Rebus novels..the early novels are a bit simplistic but by around the 4th in the series,they really start to take off as Rankin developed his abilities as a writer.Wonderful characterisation here too,and Rebus is as real to me as anyone I know.
Yesterday is a memory. Tomorrow is the unknown. Now is the knowing. - Ven.Ajahn Sumedho

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#29 grobag

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 10:27 AM

I couldn't get into Gormenghast and gave up which is rare for me - I usually read it anyway. Maybe I'll try again, it's in one of the bookcases I'm sure :yinyang:
I, as a responsible adult human being, will never concede the power to anyone to regulate my choice of what I put into my body, or where I go with my mind. From the skin inwards is my jurisdiction is it not? I choose what may or may not cross that border. - A Shulgin.
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#30 ninorc

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 10:31 AM

American scream - Bill Hicks life story

easily my all time favourite comedian!

I read that last year for research purposes and it was a bit flat; just the facts, like. There's a newer one called Bill Hicks: Agent of Evolution by his bast friend, Kevin Booth (I haven't read it) but I really recommend the collection of his routines, Love All The People.

I just read Hangover Square by Patrick Hamilton, which has been selected by (London radio DJ) Robert Elms as an essential London book. It's set in 1939, as war is breaking out in Europe, and the protagonist is a lost, rudderless soul who is prone to periods of disassociation which are exacerbated by his heavy drinking. He is infatuated by a cold, glamorous woman who uses him contemptuously and whom he plans to kill when in his 'funny' moods. The book evokes the gloomy atmosphere of smokey pubs where people are determinedly getting drunk to blank out the horror of impending war and their own hopeless lives while clinging onto shreds of British respectability and being completely incapable of emotional articulacy. Yes, it's pretty depressing although there is a thread of dark humour and I was pretty grateful when he finally got around to it... The murder story reminded me of Martin Amis, particularly London Fields (in which a woman who is to be murdered is portrayed as being in some way complicit). So, anyway, I suggest you don't bother!

Edited by ninorc, 23 January 2006 - 10:33 AM.

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