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MadagascarX

Total Lumens per Light

54 posts in this topic

Its a proven fact....

The more Light your plants will recieve, the bigger, stronger they will become. The only draw back to these higher wattage unit is Heat build up! Most plants will grom most effective between temps ranging between 20-28 deg Celceus and it is also best to try and avoid large temperature fluctuations between night and day as this can lead to weak and poorley formed plants.

It is ideal for most species to try and bring these two temps as close together as possible which is easier to accomplish than you think :ghost: Most effective way is a propane heater (usually sold as Greenhouse heaters)

Anyway......Back to the topic at hand. Here is a lowdown of how many lumens each light unit gives off, along with its cost of running.

Lamp: 400W Halide

Lumens: 38,000

Efficiency: 95 lumens per watt

Cost per 12 hours@ 8p a unit: 38p

Lamp: 400W Sodium

Lumens: 53,000

Efficiency: 135 lumens per watt

Cost per 12 hours@ 8p a unit: 38p

Lamp: 600W Sodium

Lumens: 92,000

Efficiency: 153 lumens per watt

Cost per 12 hours@ 8p a unit: 58p

Lamp: 1,000W Halide

Lumens: 115,000

Efficiency: 115 lumens per watt

Cost per 12 hours@ 8p a unit: 96p

Lamp: 1,000W Sodium

Lumens: 140,000

Efficiency: 140 lumens per watt

Cost per 12 hours@ 8p a unit: 96p

Happy Gardening!!!

MadagascarX

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Thanks that is really helpful do you know the lumen output for 600w halides? It would also help to have the make of each lamp quoted.

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hi OT,

Sorry mate, These are based on the Philips SonT+ and HPI Halide light. I don't know for sure the lumen output on the 600W Philips Halide, ..I'm not sure if they actually do one.

I know the Venture 600W halide produces 50,000 lumens.

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Reposted from two other threads: No responses yet.

Can anyone help?

I am buying Japanese made, cool white (called "daylight") 24w (120w equivalent) compact fluro's - 3 for HK$90.00 (about seven pounds fifty).

They are rated 6400K and and are bright as buttons.

I also have the option of getting either "warm white" at 4200K, or "warm" at 2700K. Neither of these seem to chuck out anything like the same amount of brightness, but are, obviously, a more orangey colour.

There was a thread about the different "K's", but I couldn't find it. Can anyone remember where it is, explain what "K's" are, or direct me to a link learn more about the "K" thingy?

And can someone let me know (for flowering with fluro's) which would be better. The warm only - 2700K, the warm white only - 4200K, a mixture of those two, or a mix of all three types including the daylight at 6400K?

The ones I use at the moment, put out so little heat, I can get them very close to the plants (currently 6X24w daylights = 144w).

For flowering, could I simply add six of the warmer ones to the game and hence keep the daylights, but with a total of 288w of compact fluro light?

I could also arrange the lights at different levels, both above and among the plants to improve penetration since they are so cool.

Whatdaya all think?

Thanks.

:ninja:

Woof

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Hi Jessiedog

Hope this helps

The higher the color temperature, the more 'blue' the light, and the lower the color temperature the more 'red' the light. Color temperature of light can be measured in degrees Kelvin (K). Daylight has a color temperature between 6000 and 7000 K. The color temperature of artificial light is much lower: approximately 3000 K. In reality, color temperatures range from 1900 K (candlelight) up to 25,000 K (clear blue sky). Television is set to 6500 K, simulating 'standard daylight'.

Color temperature Source

in kelvin

12,000 - 20,000 Skylight (blue sky)

8000 Average summer shade

7100 Light summer shade

6500 Typical summer light (sun + sky)

6300 Daylight fluorescent (caution!)

6400 Xenon short-arc

6000 Overcast sky

5900 Clear mercury lamp

5400 Sunlight (noon, summer, mid-latitudes)

5200 Design white fluorescent

5000 Special fluorescents used for color evaluation

4800 - 5000 Daylight photoflood

4300 Sunlight (early morning and late afternoon)

4000 Brite White Deluxe Mercury lamp

3500 Sunlight (1 hour after dawn)

3400 Cool white fluorescent (caution!)

3400 Photoflood

3200 Professional tungsten photographic lights

3000 100-watt tungsten halogen

2950 Deluxe Warm White fluorescent

2870 100-watt incandescent

2500 40-watt incandescent

2100 High-pressure sodium light

2000 Sunlight (sunrise or sunset)

1850 - 1900 Candle flame

1700 Match flame

This is a great file to read about the gro-lux and other lights: http://www.sylvania.com/forum/pdfs/faq0040-0800.pdf

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Hi pen,

Thanks!

That's exactly what I was looking for.

Now!

Can you explain what it all means? :ninja:

"And can someone let me know (for flowering with fluro's) which would be better. The warm only - 2700K, the warm white only - 4200K, a mixture of those two, or a mix of all three types including the daylight at 6400K?

The ones I use at the moment, put out so little heat, I can get them very close to the plants (currently 6X24w daylights = 144w).

For flowering, could I simply add six of the warmer ones to the game and hence keep the daylights, but with a total of 288w of compact fluro light?

I could also arrange the lights at different levels, both above and among the plants to improve penetration since they are so cool."

We're talking fluros here. I already understand HPS.

Oh! And what is the "Caution" about?

Thanks and blessings.

:woot:

Woof

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Hey jessie Dog

I'll help you out. It's actually quite easy. Start your seedlings with as close to daylight as possible. 6500k(daylight) is best right up till you start flowering. then change your bulbs to a redder spectrum for flowering. If you use HPS you will find that your temp in kelvin drops right down to about 1900k, which is perfect for flowering. Or if you are staying with floros(not advisable, far less bud at the end) you must change your tubes to 2700k when flowering.

Stay high

Dr.Sativa

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Thanks peeps.

So, if I were going with compact fluros for flowering then, I'd be better off using all 2700K, rather than a mix of 2700K and 6400K. Is that right?

Or should I just add additional 2700K's to the existing 6400K's?

Also, would having some of them hanging down among the plants increase light penetration?

Thanks.

;)

Woof

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Just go & get yasen a decent HPS & stop messin' about! :);)

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Just trying to expand me knowledge Bish.

Keep yer 'air on!

;)

:)

Woof

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Hi,

You can also get really good info on lights, lamps etc at RSonline, sorry havn't got the link :(

But seem to remember some new double HID lamps being available, which effectively double the life of your lamp, for just less than double the price, handy :)

I think i had to register(free) to get access to the technical data sheets, which means i must still have access......i'll go and do a search and try and copy a link

Which is a major technical feat in my present stoned state ;)

ufo

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RS Components

Tks for the info MGX,

Can anyone give me the low-down on 400w mixed spectrum bulbs.

Are there different types?

Are they always 430w.

Cheers MYH

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I think what size grow room u got & then extraction is important. :ghost:

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Mind Your Head,

Nice one mate! :ouch::huh:

ufo

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