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Lancaster8

Benefits of growing in organic compost in view of the risks of introducing bugs!

My interest in composting goes back probably 20+ years now with Cannabis growing for 10 years. Even though I have a tiny garden in a built up area, I recycle everything and sometimes give compost away. 

 

I have always had a big interest in using my own compost for my cannabis plants but I steer away from it nowadays.   I have, in the past tried

 

using my compost for my plants but all that has happened is that it has introduced pests and caused me problems in my tents.  I have considered microwaving small quantities bag by bag to sterilise, but then we are probably removing part of the point of using it in the first place. 

 

Currently, I am back to experimentation, (because I have full jars! :yep:)   

 

I had one plant that had been very sick because is it had been attacked by spider mites.  It has recovered and is now bug free.  I thought I would re-pot it to the next stage up using a commercial bag of farmyard manure.

 

Even though this product is full of good stuff - it is also seemingly bug-free.  I have not seen anything living in it at all.  (There may still be at microscopic size - but haven't checked.) I have no idea how the commercial companies achieve this.  Anyway, this previously sick plant has suddenly

 

gone crazy, and is growing like a triffid since it has dipped its  roots into the manure.  I think I will extend the use of it to younger plants and see how they respond to it!  However, I would still like to know if there is any way of making use of my own.

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I had one plant that had been very sick because is it had been attacked by spider mites.  It has recovered and is now bug free.  I thought I would re-pot it to the next stage up using a commercial bag of farmyard manure.

 

Even though this product is full of good stuff - it is also seemingly bug-free.  I have not seen anything living in it at all.  (There may still be at microscopic size - but haven't checked.) I have no idea how the commercial companies achieve this.  Anyway, this previously sick plant has suddenly

 

gone crazy, and is growing like a triffid since it has dipped its  roots into the manure.  I think I will extend the use of it to younger plants and see how they respond to it!  However, I would still like to know if there is any way of making use of my own.

 

Is that not just the plant making use of the N.P.K In the manure mate  .It might be sterilized manure mate but it still has the NPK your plants need

 

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I've been weighing up using homemade compost, getting bugs in my attic tent and then my loft has put me off though. I'm doing some hot compost this season on a south facing wall and wondering if that will be "clean".  One of my piles is full of horse muck amongst other things, the girls would love it. I wish we could legally have one plant per household in UK, I'd use that growlight in the sky for my one. :yinyang:

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@Lancaster8 What brand off farmyard manure are you using mate

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Posted (edited)

10 minutes ago, Jimboo said:

@Lancaster8 What brand off farmyard manure are you using mate

Gro-sure  .   I can get bags of farmyard manure from a mushroom farm - but this stuff tends to be quite hot.

Edited by Lancaster8
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Putting that compost through a worm bin should sort out any bug probs,i've never seen any bugs in finished castings.I usually put mushroom compost through a few weeks in the worm bin before using as find is hot and can have a very high ph

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1 hour ago, j.a.g said:

Putting that compost through a worm bin should sort out any bug probs,i've never seen any bugs in finished castings.I usually put mushroom compost through a few weeks in the worm bin before using as find is hot and can have a very high ph

 

This is ALL worm compost. That is how it is created.  It is full of all kinds of creatures.  Yes you are right about mushroom compost. It is very hot stuff and I don't use it nowadays, as it needs to be added to worm bins only gently because even the worms are cautious of it. 

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spent mushroom compost should not be "hot"

if anything the opposite:unsure:

 

one of the biggest benefits of growing with organic soils is the amount of "bugs" as you call them. 

They are my best workers/soldiers when it comes to conditioning the soil for my plants:thumsup:

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3 hours ago, buddy13 said:

spent mushroom compost should not be "hot"

if anything the opposite:unsure:

 

one of the biggest benefits of growing with organic soils is the amount of "bugs" as you call them. 

They are my best workers/soldiers when it comes to conditioning the soil for my plants:thumsup:

Mushroom compost from agaricus bisporus is still very hot when they call it "spent" and are finished with it at mushroom farms.

Top dressing with a bit is ok but any more without further composting is gonna burn stuff. 

It's not like a brf cake after the fourth flush 

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Posted (edited)

I used a good quality peat and added a lot of bought worm compost to make a nice soil.

I veg in Compo Sana or Canna Pro which is just a quality pre fertilised mix with perlite.  (this keeps my seedlings and young plants away from unknown home-made composts). There's enough fertiliser in these premade composts for about six weeks vegging just add tap water.

Sometimes in spring I make an anaerobic Borage tea for older vegging plants.

I make compost teas using a aquarium pump for extra oxygen and blackstrap mollasses to feed the bacteria. This is for flowering.

This seems to eliminate 'bugs'. Liquidise your compost!

Put a good handful of your manure in a bucket of water and stir it as often as possible  for a couple of days.

You can dilute this 'tea' further if you suspect it is really hot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Geoff
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20 hours ago, blackpoolbouncer said:

Top dressing with a bit is ok but any more without further composting is gonna burn stuff. 

 

I mulch my beds pretty thickly each year, alternating spent mushroom compost with cow manure blend, to try and balance the ph, and have never had/seen a burnt plant but I do grow mostly tropical/hungry plants :cowboy:

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I've made aerobic hot compost and used it on my indoor plants. Sadly I ended up having to put a pair of tights around each pot to seal in the coming invasion of fungus gnats and I'm glad I did. So what I would say is if you do decide to use the compost, you would want to water in Sciarid Fly nematodes.

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42 minutes ago, SolomonBruceman said:

I've made aerobic hot compost and used it on my indoor plants. Sadly I ended up having to put a pair of tights around each pot to seal in the coming invasion of fungus gnats and I'm glad I did. So what I would say is if you do decide to use the compost, you would want to water in Sciarid Fly nematodes.

 

I won't bother.  More trouble than it's worth!  Have been doing OK lately and haven't had any issues. Not going to create extra problems for myself unnecessarily!  It's nice when things actually go OK for extended period of time!  ;) 

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33 minutes ago, Lancaster8 said:

 

I won't bother.  More trouble than it's worth!  Have been doing OK lately and haven't had any issues. Not going to create extra problems for myself unnecessarily!  It's nice when things actually go OK for extended period of time!  ;) 

Exactly, more trouble than its worth in my opinion.  Nice to have a measured amount of nutrients in the compost as well, less guess work.

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