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Xmgsneakyg

Little flying basterds

So iv got what I'm pretty sure are fungas gnats iv seen people putting sand in top o pots dose this work what's your best ways to controll/eliminate them are they ganna cause detrimental problems any advice appreciated pleas don't ask me get a picture of them lol

I'm in Coco 6week in veg temps/rh all sweet

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get a load of sticky traps and catch/kill the adults

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26 minutes ago, ratdog said:

get a load of sticky traps and catch/kill the adults

 

Thanks I'm ganna go sticky traps and a layer of play sand 

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I found nemarodes work the best and sticky trap and neem oil in spray that get rid of them aslo stick some pepple or sand on top of your pots 

 

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The gnats need stagnant water to survive with high humidity and minimum air flow. I would suggest cleaning any water spillages up, collecting the run off and removing it from the growing environment asap because water just sitting there with no movement or air is a breeding ground. My suggestions for removing the gnats would be to lower the humidity to 20-30% and increase the air flow in the environment drastically. Im not sure of your feeding regime but I'm assuming your flooding once a day what's causing excess run off and water to accumulate to prevent this I would suggest feeding/watering 2-3 times throughout the day in smaller increments to prevent run off and also let the medium dry out in between feeds. As someone else has suggested sticky traps work well too.

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48 minutes ago, Hydro-H said:

The gnats need stagnant water to survive with high humidity and minimum air flow.

 

 

not sure that's true mate, no stagnant water in my last grow and definitely not high humidity, also air flow is not a problem either. in my experience they come from poorly kept compost, probably stored outside.

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Yes contaminated soil is definitely a high probability factor. One of the main reasons I only do hydro indoor and then do organic soil outdoor in the summer to prevent my indoor area becoming infected. If my outdoor plants become affected then I will spray them with a homemade garlic and neem tincture but in no way would I start spraying that in my indoor set up. Heres some information for the OP I got from a website else where to help him with his troubles.

HOW TO PREVENT FUNGUS GNATS

Use these prevention techniques in tandem with the traps listed above for the best results.

  • Keep soil dry: Fungus gnats seek out moist soil, so allowing your houseplants to dry out a bit between waterings can slow down or stop an infestation. Let the top inch or two of soil dry out before watering again, and try to go as long as possible between waterings. Gnats may be deterred from laying their eggs if the soil is dry on the surface.

  • Mosquito dunks: Mosquito dunks are used to keep mosquito larvae from populating fountains, animal troughs, fish ponds, and other small bodies of water. The product consists of a dry pellet containing a type of bacteria called Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies isrealensis. This beneficial bacteria infects and kills the larvae of flying insects, including mosquitoes, fruit flies, and fungus gnats.

    • To use mosquito dunks: Fill up a gallon jug (or watering can) with clean water and toss in a mosquito dunk. It’s a good idea to break up the dunk a bit before placing it in the water, or you can wait for it to soften before breaking it apart. Let the dunk soak in the water for as long as possible (at least overnight), then remove it from the water (the dunk can be reused) and use this water for fungus gnat–infested plants. The bacteria will have leeched into the water and will now infect and kill any larvae that come into contact with it in the soil. Repeat this process every time you water your plants for at least a few months.
  • Sand layer: Put a half-inch layer of coarse sand on top of your houseplant’s soil to stop adult gnats from laying eggs and new gnats from emerging from the soil. Consistent coverage is key. Be sure to water from the bottom of the pot, too; otherwise the sand will just wash away.

  • Cover drainage holes: Though gnats typically remain near the tops of pots, they may find their way to the drainage holes on the underside of a pot and start laying eggs there, too. If this happens, cover the drainage holes with a piece of synthetic fabric to prevent the gnats from getting in or out of the hole, but to also let water pass through freely. Attach with tape or rubber bands.

 

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I reckon I brought them in I had a sheet of plastic I used to create a catch for run of it was in the garden. I do leave run of in ther under my Frame sometimes so that will not be happening now. My light will be coming in to play next Friday so my intake will be needed then and extraction will be turned up so air circulation will be increased then I'm ganna order the sand and sticky traps and might take the miss tights n get them over the pot as well. 

 

Now I cannot order anything until Friday due to funds. am I going to find that they have infested me by then or can I get away with it for a few more days. 

 

And befor anyone says a bag o sands a £10er n traps are £3 it's JANUARY !! 

 

Thanks to y'all who've got back to me so nice when I come across a problem in ther start flappin n then remember you lot are here. Peace 

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