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Jimmeh

Overloading electrics

32 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

OK ladies & gents, quick question for you all please!

Just want to check my understanding, make sure I don't come up with a plan that later turns out to be stupid.

I did a few searches for likley threads (mainly using the term "electrics" & didn't find owt, so I thought better to ask & sound thick than take the risk and prove it. ;)

 

So my space has a single double socket available to it, and I want to make sure that by plugging in many, low-wattage devices I don't end up overloading anything.

On the one side of my double socket I run my lights & RVK, and on the other, I intend to run a number of lower-wattage heating devices via a high quality multi-adapter to keep things warm around the roots & soil in autumn (outhouse grow) as I think flowering will finish just around November ends.

 

I understand the general advice that the amount of amps drawn is equal to the amount of watts drawn divided by the voltage.

So in theory, assuming a regular 13a socket, I can just total-up the wattage of everything I have plugged in, divide that figure by 240(v), and as long as that comes to under 13 (plus a bit of headroom to be safe), I should be good, right?

 

I did the above calculation, to leave a bit of headroom as a safety margin I used 230v instead of the usual 240v.

I also "up-rated" the fans a little as I couldn't find wattage ratings for them, so I used the power draw of an 8" RVK L as a safe value.

Also, I used the power draw of a double-blanket as I couldn't find the value for my small single.

 

Item Watts
Led Light 275
RVK 125 L 55
Oscillating fan 153
Secondary Fan 153
Electric blanket 70
Tube heater #1 120
Tube Heater #2 120
Heat mat #1 25
Heat mat #2 25
Heat mat #3 25
Total Watts 1021
Amps Drawn 4.44

 

Is it really as simple as that?

Only 4 & a half amps drawn by all those items combined?

 

Sorry if this sounds so basic that I shouldn't even need to ask, and i will get myself a watt meter (actually I'll need one anyway to accurately control the LED) - but I needed to ask just to make sure - I've made the mistake of thinking I understand simple things before & got myself into trouble! :unsure: lol

 

Edited by Jimmeh
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Well I believe a single socket can take 3000 watts? It’s fused to 13A too....

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Yeah its that simple

 

However it even better because it wont all be on at the same time so it wont pull the full current ever!

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Cheers gents - I knew I'd sound stupid but just had to check I wasn't missing anything really obvious.

Then again, no point in risking having my grow go up in smoke while I'm not there to enjoy it, ay? :bong:

Muchos thankos both.

 

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3 minutes ago, ilikebigbuds said:

Well I believe a single socket can take 3000 watts? It’s fused to 13A too....

 

Not quite mate, 3kW is indeed 13A but thats the peak output not continuous, the standard for sockets (BS1363) specifies the current ratings

 

Its been discussed before

 

Quote

 

All MK socket-outlets are manufactured to comply with BS1363 part 2: 1995 and are rated at 13A per unit. Double socket-outlets have been manufactured and tested to exceed this rating by margin that allows electrical safety and reduces the risk of heat and mechanical damage to components due to overloading. It should be noted that BS1363 part 2: 1995 does not allow double sockets to operate at twice the permissible maximum loading and it should be remembered that double socket-outlets are not manufactured to be able to withstand a 26A load for sustained periods of time.

Research by ourselves and third party organisations has shown that all MK double sockets can safely withstand a continuous load of 19.5A for an indefinite period. Increasing the load slightly will begin to cause heat and mechanical stresses on the components in a relatively short period. Testing showed that a load of 22.3A was sufficient to cause heat stress that would cause a browning of the faceplates and sufficient heat to cause insulation damage to cable cores

A load of 24A for 43 hours was sufficient to cause significant heat damage to the material in which the socket-outlet was situated and within 75 hours sufficient to cause significant damage that would lead to the very real potential of fire.

 

 

 

:yinyang:

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Posted (edited)

Mr Jones, I know you are the electrical KING around here. So I won't disagree with the documentation youve provided here top man :yep:

18 minutes ago, Jimmeh said:

I knew I'd sound stupid but just had to check I wasn't missing anything really obvious.

Mate I recommend you listen to Dave here and don't do as i say.... your house may become an inferno (no sarcasm intended) :chains:

Edited by ilikebigbuds
No sarcasm!
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Posted (edited)

28 minutes ago, Davey Jones said:

 

:yinyang:

 

Had to go back to page 1 to find the absolute gem that is "make sure you earth your water" - Ok, that thread is both informative and entertaining! :yep:

Edited by Jimmeh
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Posted (edited)

lollollol Earth your water is the dumbest thing I have ever read in my whole life, I am not joking  

 

Its stil tickilng me after all these years, earth your water lmao

 

I linked teh wrong thread though mate lol
 

Quote


BS1363-2:1995 requires for double socket outlets that both socket outlets have loads applied via test plugs, 1 test plug having a load of 14 amps whilst the other has a load of 6 amps, making a total load of 20 amps on the cable supplying the double socket outlet. The double socket outlet is then subjected to this loading for a minimum continuous period of 4 hours or longer until stability is reached with a maximum duration of 8 hours (stability being taken as less than 1 degC rise within 1 h). The test is passed if neither the terminals / terminations, nor the accessible external surface, increase in temperature by more than 52 degC.


 

 

not sure how I did that thats what I wanted to post

 

 

Edited by Davey Jones
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20 minutes ago, ilikebigbuds said:

Mr Jones, I know you are the electrical KING around here. So I won't disagree with the documentation youve provided here top man :yep:

Mate I recommend you listen to Dave here and don't do as i say.... your house may become an inferno (no sarcasm intended) :chains:

 

No one knows everything and the devil is in the details, I personally despise reading standards, it bores me to death but its got to be done

 

:yinyang:

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9 minutes ago, Davey Jones said:

lollollol Earth your water is the dumbest thing I have ever read in my whole life, I am not joking  

 

Its stil tickilng me after all these years, earth your water lmao

 

I linked teh wrong thread though mate lol
 

 

not sure how I did that that's what I wanted to post

 

 

 

Haha well i was wondering what exactly the connection was, but the second thread - nice one - that's excellent info right there mate, and I'm bookmarking that. Thanks  :yep:

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HaHa Yes mate. Earth to water haha! Earth to the Moon! Over.

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@Davey Jones  Im really sorry if you have covered this before but a questions if I may,

 

I run an two cables (big ones) from a twin socket in the house .....whats the max load on the very heavy duty cable ?

 

ty

 

kenny

:hippy:

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@zen-ken   What are you actually asking? Your question is pretty vague? There is no electrical specification for "very heavy duty cable". 

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Posted (edited)

@zen-kenI thought the heavy duty cable can take 13A. Cable from a multi adapter for instance. I am sure @Davey Jones can confirm. Jim I think the ring main is important as you can overload that, even if socket is safe load, and get cut outs from appliances not associated with the grow, like a microwave. 

Edited by ROCKSTEADY6

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1 hour ago, ROCKSTEADY6 said:

@zen-kenI thought the heavy duty cable can take 13A. Cable from a multi adapter for instance. I am sure @Davey Jones can confirm. Jim I think the ring main is important as you can overload that, even if socket is safe load, and get cut outs from appliances not associated with the grow, like a microwave. 

 

Dude, this makes no sense. Once again there is no such cable capacity as " heavy duty cable". Cable comes in CSA (cross sectional area) of mm squared. This size (and a host of other factors) determine the current carrying capacity of said cable.  

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