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bruvnic

My compost pile

28 posts in this topic
2 hours ago, ratdog said:

 

I compost food waste, root balls and garden waste in heaps with pallets (the ones without gaps between the slats) around the outside and a lid, you want it on the ground and the worms will find it soon enough, with this method you will have a decent compost in four months, in the summer maybe quicker.

 

 

My “garden” is actually a roof terrace so no access for the worms   which is why I was thinking to buy some

 

Worst case if I do buy a load of worms and they die in their how bad would that stink and would they then not eventually decompose and make my compost richer? 

 

 

 

 

 

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Worst case is they die. They won't smell in a compost heap. You will just wonder where they have gone @bruvnic

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They would become part of the compost and enrich it.All worm castings will have composted dead worms in it.1 of the good things about having worms do the composting is the decrease of rotten smells.Have only ever had a strong smell once in my worms when added a load of slightly rotten spring greens but only lasted a couple of days

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Nice one lads,  looks like I’m getting some new wriggly friends then! 

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Be very careful if you buy a worm bin, do some research first.

 

Probably the biggest mistake you could make would be putting it on a roof terrace, you’ll cook ‘em unless you can provide shade and guarantee temperatures don’t go much above 25C.

 

Believe me, I’ve been there.

 

The other important factor is humidity, they like it damp but not wet. Control that with shredded cardboard.

 

I’ve had mine for about two and a half years now, a Worm City 4 tray system although I only use 3 trays. Keep it in the kitchen :yes:

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Just so your aware your "compost" will be full of fungus gnats and other potential pests.

 

I've used my own hot compost and as a preventative I put pairs of tights over the pots and tied them around the stems. If I hadn't of it would have been swarming with gnats come flower time, they were hundreds trapped in each pot, they end up stuck to your bud, it's rank and best avoided.

 

If you do decide to bring your "compost" indoors I would advise you to treat it with Nemasys Fruit and Veg to keep them in check.

 

Personally I would add some fish blood and bone (wilko) to it then mix it 50/50 with fresh compost like say Westlands Jacks Magic (b&m). I'd then use it for growing Sarpo Mira (blight resistent) potatoes up on your roof terrence in big pots.

Edited by SolomonBruceman
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say i dug out a bucket full of the fully composted bit of my pile that's bound to be full of worm castings by now what would br the best way to use it?

 

i guess top dressing is a no no seen as it'll be full of pests,     is their a way to setralize it without killing all the goodness too?

 

 

could i make a tea out of it that would kill any bugs in the process?

 

im also top dressing with coffee grounds,  i could get a load from a local coffee shop and add that to the tea too,  is it possible to over do top dressing with coffee grounds or should i just keep chucking them on as top dressing?

 

 

im also  collecting banana peels and I'm either gonna add these to a tea or roast them and grind tham and add these as a top dressing too

 

 

any advice is most welcome

 

thanks!

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Mate don't shoot the messenger with this I know everyone recommends spent coffee grounds but have a read at this 

https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/catalog/5272385

 

Applying spent coffee grounds directly to urban agriculture soils greatly reduces plant growth
Author:
Hardgrove, Sarah J., Livesley, Stephen J.
Source:
Urban forestry & urban greening 2016 v.18 pp. 1-8
ISSN:
1618-8667
Subject:
Helianthus annuus, Viola, application rate, biomass, broccoli, composting, fertilizers, food production, gardens, horticultural crops, leeks, loam soils, mineralization, nitrates, nitrogen, nitrogen content, organic wastes, phytotoxicity, plant growth, production technology, radishes, sandy clay loam soils, soil amendments, soil pH, soil treatment, soil water, urban agriculture, water holding capacity, weeds
Abstract:
There are frequent anecdotal recommendations for the use of locally produced spent coffee grounds in urban agriculture and gardens, either through direct soil application or after composting with other urban organic wastes. This study investigates the scientific basis for direct application of spent coffee grounds (SCG) and the influence of different: (i) plant pH and nitrogen preferences, (ii) soil types, and (iii) application rates. We specifically consider impacts upon plant growth, soil hydrology and nitrogen transformation processes.We grew five horticultural plants (broccoli, leek, radish, viola and sunflower) in sandy, sandy clay loam and loam soils, with and without SCG and fertilizer amendments. The same horticultural plants were grown in the field with 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 25% SCG amendment rates. Plant biomass growth was related to soil pH, soil moisture, nitrogen concentration and net mineralization, as was weed growth after harvesting.All horticultural plants grew poorly in response to SCG, regardless of soil type and fertiliser addition. Increasing SCG amendment significantly increased soil water holding capacity, but also decreased horticultural plant growth and subsequent weed growth. There was evidence of nitrate immobilization with SCG amendment. Growth suppression was not explained by soil pH change, or nitrogen availability, so is more likely due to phytotoxic effects.Fresh SCG should not be used as a soil amendment in ‘closed loop’ urban food production systems without consideration of potential growth suppression. Further research is required to determine the optimal composting conditions for SCG and blends with other organic wastes.
Agid:

5272385

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Posted (edited)

7 minutes ago, Jimboo said:

Mate don't shoot the messenger with this I know everyone recommends spent coffee grounds but have a read at this 

https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/catalog/5272385

 

Applying spent coffee grounds directly to urban agriculture soils greatly reduces plant growth
Author:
Hardgrove, Sarah J., Livesley, Stephen J.
Source:
Urban forestry & urban greening 2016 v.18 pp. 1-8
ISSN:
1618-8667
Subject:
Helianthus annuus, Viola, application rate, biomass, broccoli, composting, fertilizers, food production, gardens, horticultural crops, leeks, loam soils, mineralization, nitrates, nitrogen, nitrogen content, organic wastes, phytotoxicity, plant growth, production technology, radishes, sandy clay loam soils, soil amendments, soil pH, soil treatment, soil water, urban agriculture, water holding capacity, weeds
Abstract:
There are frequent anecdotal recommendations for the use of locally produced spent coffee grounds in urban agriculture and gardens, either through direct soil application or after composting with other urban organic wastes. This study investigates the scientific basis for direct application of spent coffee grounds (SCG) and the influence of different: (i) plant pH and nitrogen preferences, (ii) soil types, and (iii) application rates. We specifically consider impacts upon plant growth, soil hydrology and nitrogen transformation processes.We grew five horticultural plants (broccoli, leek, radish, viola and sunflower) in sandy, sandy clay loam and loam soils, with and without SCG and fertilizer amendments. The same horticultural plants were grown in the field with 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 25% SCG amendment rates. Plant biomass growth was related to soil pH, soil moisture, nitrogen concentration and net mineralization, as was weed growth after harvesting.All horticultural plants grew poorly in response to SCG, regardless of soil type and fertiliser addition. Increasing SCG amendment significantly increased soil water holding capacity, but also decreased horticultural plant growth and subsequent weed growth. There was evidence of nitrate immobilization with SCG amendment. Growth suppression was not explained by soil pH change, or nitrogen availability, so is more likely due to phytotoxic effects.Fresh SCG should not be used as a soil amendment in ‘closed loop’ urban food production systems without consideration of potential growth suppression. Further research is required to determine the optimal composting conditions for SCG and blends with other organic wastes.
Agid:

5272385

 

 

Well that’s good to know I’ll stop top dressing and scrape off the bit I put on then I’ve only done it once and not even watered yet.  What would I do without you :) 

 

 

what hat do you recon about making a tea out of banana skins or top dressing with hem for postassium?    

 

Best way way to use my homemade worm castings?  Seterlaize, tea or don’t bother?

 

also is seaweed meal good in flower or just veg?  

 

What about adding ding coffee grounds to my compost pile is hat still ok? 

 

Thanks! 

Edited by bruvnic

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what hat do you recon about making a tea out of banana skins or top dressing with hem for postassium?    

I did both last grow mate  but both the tea and top dressing were mixed with EWCs

 

Quote

Best way way to use my homemade worm castings?  Seterlaize, tea or don’t bother?

Best way to sterilize EWC is to finish them out mate, If you are constantly adding fresh food you will always be getting bugs, as soon as the food has gone the bulk of the baddy bugs will leave, ( touch wood and all that) I've never had bugs from my EWC ,. I'm using last years worm castings that I bagged up at the end of last summer .Looking at this years castings still too many bugs in it mate but I have stopped feeding so by the end of this summer it will be ready to bag up for next year :yes: imho

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I wouldn't bother scraping the coffee grounds off mate, but I wouldn't bother getting vast amounts from the local coffee shop either.I'm only going by what I read In that article mate

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What about digging out a few live worms and sticking 2 in each pot,  good, bad or pointless?

 

 

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