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theokoles

Garden project and veg plot.

218 posts in this topic

Hey folks, a few pics of my new garden. It's a bit of a long term project.

 

 

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Edited by theokoles
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Nice long garden. I myself grow tobacco plants outside in the summer - perfectly legal where I am.

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I have to say the whole garden looks on the damp side.

I wonder if theres a layer of clay under the topsoil thats making it retain water.

Have you tried to ph test the soil? it may need some ammendments for growing veg.

Not that I grow veg so take it with a pinch.

Hmm

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You are right mate, although i took the pics this morning. Most of the garden down towards the shed is dry, the veggie patch looks a bit damp this morning (the patch before the shed) after the shed there is a patch that is retaining water, i had a gardener come in last week and he said we just need to dig a hole about 2m long and 1m deep, sand, breeze blocks and create a drainage system..no big deal he said. I've not tested the soil yet got a ph kit so glad you reminded me. The other option was to use raised beds in that area.  

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I personally wouldn't have a Monkey Puzzle on my land, nobody really wants to work on them when that becomes necessary, as it probably will in a suburban garden, so the price goes up accordingly. Not too hard to get shot of it now...

 

Looks like you've got plenty to keep you busy mate, hope it goes well.

 

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Looks like a nice garden mate, I would collect up all those leaves and let them rot down to add back to the garden next year, and a good few days of weeding and you will be half-way there to a lovely garden.

 

Any ideas what you want to do to make it "yours"?

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Its a lovely garden, nice aspect with the slope having a south facing aspect. I can't understand why you would use a gardener, why can't you do it?

 

Its pretty mature with lots and has lots of nice shrubs, rather a lot of trees, maybe to many. I'm sorry but soak aways just don't work if the soil is clay, if that the case raised beds are what you need for your vegetable beds.

 

Its obviously a garden that has had lots of love and care given it over many years, if its new to you it will take a full season to find all the plants [bulbs/perennial] to show themselves.

 

You are on a good start having a swa electricity supply  to the shed, that was not cheap to install.

 

Take a look as this link on raised beds by Charles Dowding:-

 

https://youtu.be/OIojWdJz0RE

 

Whatever its a nice garden I wish you many years of joy playing with it.

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1 hour ago, ratdog said:

 

Any ideas what you want to do to make it "yours"?

 

Got a few ideas. Had quite a bit on lately and only just moved in. That said, have ordered some bamboo fencing a sample 5m x 2m roll and going to attach it to the existing fence to give more height/privacy. If it looks OK will use more of it. The very bottom of the garden where the monkey puzzle tree is, is a lovely space, the previous owner bought some of the neighbors land about 15 years ago,  going to make it a bit more private and just tidy the edges and borders up for now, maybe one day a summer house would be nice down there..there's a fruit tree thats branches have been wrapped around a trellis, but the trellis is broken and blown over, i need to carefully break the trellis up buy a new one and somehow reattach the branches to the new trellis.

 

There's then a bit from the bottom where the monkey puzzle tree is, leading back towards the shed that's water logged..once this is sorted, just going to keep it simple and reestablish the lawn with some grass seed, tidy the borders and might make a gravel path there also from shed to bottom. 

 

Back past the shed and up a few steps coming back towards the house, is a place for a veggie patch. It is a bit uneven but i can sort that out and get some raised beds on that patch and plant some veggies round the outer perhaps too.

 

Again coming back towards the house is a nice chill out spot where the tree is, there's a big slate table that the birds feed from, going to put up some bird boxes in that tree (facing east) and have a table and chairs for that area. Coffee and Brandy outside if the weather permits this weekend ...

 

Closest to the house, not sure what to do yet.. probably leave it as is and just tidy it up a bit for now.

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1 hour ago, oldtimer1 said:

Its a lovely garden, nice aspect with the slope having a south facing aspect. I can't understand why you would use a gardener, why can't you do it?

 

Its pretty mature with lots and has lots of nice shrubs, rather a lot of trees, maybe to many. I'm sorry but soak aways just don't work if the soil is clay, if that the case raised beds are what you need for your vegetable beds.

 

Its obviously a garden that has had lots of love and care given it over many years, if its new to you it will take a full season to find all the plants [bulbs/perennial] to show themselves.

 

You are on a good start having a swa electricity supply  to the shed, that was not cheap to install.

 

Take a look as this link on raised beds by Charles Dowding:-

 

https://youtu.be/OIojWdJz0RE

 

Whatever its a nice garden I wish you many years of joy playing with it.

 

Thanks oldtimer1, the previous owner loved the garden, was his pride and joy. One of the reasons we moved here was for the garden, although the house has been fully modernized in the last couple of years (on the insurance)... i wasn't sure about the electric supply to the shed so that's good news to hear it is decent/safe..

 

A local Gardner is a friend that likes to toke..he popped round and mentioned a way to drain the water logged section.. i'm still not certain how. 

 

Raised beds it is then, thank you for the link and kind words.

 

 

Edited by theokoles
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Looks like you got head start there mate with plants / bulbs and the shed. Hope its a good spring then at least you will be able to get in it and start thinking what you want to do with it.

 

good luck.

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1 hour ago, theokoles said:

Thanks oldtimer1, the previous owner loved the garden, was his pride and joy. One of the reasons we moved here was for the garden, although the house has been fully modernized in the last couple of years (on the insurance)... i wasn't sure about the electric supply to the shed so that's good news to hear it is decent/safe..

Soak aways are a two edged sword, with subsoils with high clay content they tend to work as a constant wet sump never draining, that causes anaerobic sour conditions that spread back through the soil around the sump contaminating the top soil and causing more soil disease.

 

Sumps only really work well long term if there is free drainage piped to lower ground away from the sump and if there is enough fall to keep the sump drained. 

 

On the electrical supply, armoured cable keeps in good condition for many years, even so it should be checked for safety, also that there is a separate earthing rod at the shed end, not expensive to do. It is also preferable that it is protected by am RCBO, this will protect you from current overload and earth leakage, this is expensive but worth upgrading to of there is no earth leakage protection at the present. It is worth getting it checked out by a good sparks as good protection saves lives.

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1 hour ago, oldtimer1 said:

Soak aways are a two edged sword, with subsoils with high clay content they tend to work as a constant wet sump never draining, that causes anaerobic sour conditions that spread back through the soil around the sump contaminating the top soil and causing more soil disease.

 

Sumps only really work well long term if there is free drainage piped to lower ground away from the sump if there is enough fall to keep the sump drained. 

 

On the electrical supply, armoured cable keeps in good condition for many years, even so it should be checked for safety, also that there is a separate earthing rod at the shed end, not expensive to do. It is also preferable that it is protected by am RCBO, this will protect you from current overload and earth leakage, this is expensive but worth upgrading to of there is no earth leakage protection at the present. It is worth getting it checked out by a good sparks as good protection saves lives.

 

Problem is i don't know where i could drain a pipe to, it wouldn't be too difficult digging a trench to lay a drain-away pipe about 2-3ft tilted down, but will have to look into this. It is only affecting about a 10-15 meter long area, from the back of the shed to the start of the bottom of the garden before it opens out. I could landscape that 10-15m with gravel and pot plants, dig a lot of the soil out and put a couple of drain-away pipes, one either side, directed towards the shed. The  landscaping would solves any issues the sour conditions would have caused anything new growing there.. 

 

Will definitely get a sparky round to do that, in fact just got the receipts at the weekend from the solicitors for the work done to the house on the insurance and some of that work was about 6ks worth of electrical work done inside the house. I will get the same sparky round to check and update as you've suggested.

 

Thank you once again. 

 

ETA just rang the sparky, got his number from the receipts. Everything is fully protected by RCBO..he's coming round with some other paperwork and going to explain all the work he's done..which is very nice of him i thought and has put my mind at ease re shed electrics.

 

 

 

Edited by theokoles
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Sorry to be a downer, but is the power to the shed the one shown tacked at knee level along the failing fence? Pretty sure that has to be run a certain depth underground, or a certain height overhead. Plenty of sparkies on here, as as Jamie T once said, it's all a lot of fun 'til someone gets done

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theokoles seems like you have most things sorted, your sparky sounds like he knows his stuff.

 

On drainage, if the shed is the lowest point in the garden, ie the garden falls from the house to the shed and also from the back back to the shed, I would not try and remediate something that may not be a problem. All year.

 

This has been a very wet winter where I am, we are  on sandy loam even so at the lowest point  the soil is saturated, I’ve grown organically for over 65 years, my problem has been learning to grow on this soil profile, saturated in winter so you can’t walk on it to extreme dryness in summer!

 

I’ve converted my cultivated vegetable beds to no dig mulching, I’m still in transition, but the lowest beds converted to no dig were fine today, I can walk on them no problem and been hoeing them its all just light fluffy compost.

 

It keeps the ground usable in winter and moist for most of the summer.

 

That is why I suggested raised beds for you for veg growing, Charles Dowding [you can learn a lot from his tube section he is on heavy clay, the exact opposite to my soil and does really well, its really worth trying, the main problem is getting enough garden compost as each of my beds are 60 x 12 ft x 5 inches thats one hell of a lot of compost. 

 

My main problem are large deer,/muntjac  and wood pigeons. But even so my brussel sprouts this year are about 5 ft tall and producing the best tasting sprouts I’ve ever grown.

 

 I wish you joy with your new garden, if you use garden compost I would not worry about ph unless you want to grow blueberries or other ericaceous type plants..

 

@woody2shoes As far as I know steel wired armour can be cleated to walls, fences and catenary wires in the open air as long the current drawn does not cause a volt drop beyond a specified %.

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20 minutes ago, oldtimer1 said:

@woody2shoes As far as I know steel wired armour can be cleated to walls, fences and catenary wires in the open air as long the current drawn does not cause a volt drop beyond a specified %.

I thank you for your great gardening Knowledge, do you think the OP knows the what the specified percentage is?

If you have been gardening organically for 65 years, what age did you start, if you don't mind me asking?

I'm always eager to learn.

 

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