Welcome to UK420

Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to contribute to this site by submitting your own content or replying to existing content. You'll be able to customize your profile, receive reputation points as a reward for submitting content, while also communicating with other members via your own private inbox, plus much more!

This message will be removed once you have signed in.


FarmerPalmersNT

No Till bonsai mothers

Havd decided to go micro no-till with my mother plants. I've got very small (3.8l) fabric pots.

 

My concern is keeping them long term without root pruning. In the plastics I just pull them, brutally chop 2/3 of the root ball with a bread knife and repot. That has served me well. I appreciate this is the most generally effective approach but id like to give a mini no till mother room a shot out of curiosity if nothing else. My mother/clone rooms have always been a frustrating source of occasional pests too and the no till is so much easier to keep free of nasties.

 

With no till uprooting them and repotting is obviously a no-no. I dont know whether this will be OK long term. My fall back is to just cull and replace with cuts every few months. That seems to be the common approach in the US organics scene as below. I'd rather not though as my clone production is certainly not this intense!..

 

 

Any experiences of bonsai mums in fabric pots appreciated!

 

I intend to feed only worm castings, vermipost and an occasional leachate tea if needed.

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, FarmerPalmersNT said:

I just pull them, brutally chop 2/3 of the root ball with a bread knife and repot.

 

With the exception of 'brutally' this is exactly how Bonsai are kept small. When I first started I used to grow bonsai cannabis, mainly because this was before I learned about 12/12 and flowering and was very restricted for space.

 

I used fluorescent lighting at a much lower level than you would use for veg growth, I kept them cool, and did not pot them up so they got extremely pot bound. I fed them only occasionally. Pinch out growing shoots often. This is how you keep the size down to bonsai levels.

 

They stayed very healthy and the leaves and branches developed a micro structure which enabled me to take very very small cuttings, and around 10 of them at a time, from a six month old plant in a 3 inch pot which was around 8 inches tall including pot.

 

I would say avoid fabric pots, they give your roots too much of what they need for vigorous growth which is not what you want with bonsai. Stick with something that will restrict your roots more and not allow them so much oxygen. Treat it more like a tiny semi-hydroponic setup, only allow it to have the limited amount of nutrients you want it to have so it grows slowly, have a very undersized pot, don't let the undersized pot dry out too much.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post

I agree with your points in principal, there are those that seem to use fabric pots for mothers very successfully. Admittedly these aren't bonsai! I'm not saying you're wrong, I think your points are valid - but I'm just keen to give it a go to see what happens apart from anything. I have concerns generally about a no-till attempt in such a ridiculously tiny pot, but I'm going to pack them in closely so that they effectively exchange moisture/microbes to hopefully improve chances. I've had a fair bit of experience of micro grows too, in cupboards and lofts so happy that I can prune and train effectively but its the root pruning that is the concern.... More than anything I'm curious to see how it pans out :)

 

At the moment its all to shit anyway as the watering setup failed while I was away so they were bone dry and nearly gone when I came back. So it'll be a while before I see any bounce back!

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post

@FarmerPalmersNT

 

It's going to interesting seeing what you do with this, but I think you'll struggle*

 

I've always used 6" pots and the pruning method (which certainly seems brutal) that's mentioned here for mums, and that pruning has always seemed essential to the health of the plant long term in the small volume ( couple of years, say). Perhaps the extra volume will make a difference, though...but I think you'll just end up feeding it like you would a mum anyway with the additions you mention. IMHO, also, if you're just going to grow a new mum from a cutting every few months it's not really a mum...as such, is it?

 

*By the way, before your thread I had a really bad impression of notil indoors. Most grows I'd seen were not producing a happy plant. I was wrong there, it can as you've shown, so mebbe I'm wrong here too :) My scepticism isn't meant to be discouragement! 

 

36 minutes ago, MicroDoser said:

tiny semi-hydroponic setup

 

That's what 'organic' growing felt like to me, after playing with the style for a while. Didn't seem to matter what complex of soil amendments I'd put together, I'd always need to revert back to the ole dance with ratios of Bloom/grow you would with using, say, GH flora 3 part. I've always used quite small pots, though, so I suspect that played major part in that.

 

 

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
13 minutes ago, j.o.i.n.t said:

@FarmerPalmersNT

 

It's going to interesting seeing what you do with this, but I think you'll struggle*

 

I've always used 6" pots and the pruning method (which certainly seems brutal) that's mentioned here for mums, and that pruning has always seemed essential to the health of the plant long term in the small volume ( couple of years, say). Perhaps the extra volume will make a difference, though...but I think you'll just end up feeding it like you would a mum anyway with the additions you mention. IMHO, also, if you're just going to grow a new mum from a cutting every few months it's not really a mum...as such, is it?

 

I'm betting on it being a struggle to be honest. I'm certainly not choosing it because its the best way of growing mums. I've always had no problems with the standard bonsai method, just fancied a challenge! I'll definitely have to feed/amend - this won't be a no amendment setup like the main bed. I'll see how it goes. If I end up having to abandon it and go back to the old plastic pots then its no bother, the fabric ones are only £1.50 and I can use them for growing on clones with some soil from the main bed.

Share this post


Link to post

@FarmerPalmersNT

 

Go for it mate :)  like I say - it'll be interesting to see what you do with it. Even a negative result is still a learning event, so to speak.

 

...I've 'retired' and you're getting me interested in growing again. This makes you a bad influence, by the way. :D 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Just now, j.o.i.n.t said:

@FarmerPalmersNT

 

Go for it mate :)  like I say - it'll be interesting to see what you do with it. Even a negative result is still a learning event, so to speak.

 

...I've 'retired' and you're getting me interested in growing again. This makes you a bad influence, by the way. :D 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very happy to be a bad influence :) I've also got a much better lighting option in there thanks to @diyleduk so that will make a difference to the productivity. 65w HLG quantum board as opposed to the crummy t5s they were used to.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post

I use small(1.5ltr)plastic pots and low light similar to @MicroDoser to slow down growth but they'll dry out every 2-4 days so have been thinking about the small(4ltr) fabric pots myself lately...

I think the fabric pots might do all the root pruning for you, as long as they're not to close together?

good luck with the challenge/experiment, I'll be keeping an eye out as usual:yep:

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post

That's what I'm hoping. Sometimes less light is good, and the t5s have advantages in that respect but this way means I can use the space more effectively for growing on clones too.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now