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sterling-archer

Boat Sea fishing-Favourite techniques?

Well i have always been a fresh water guy but my friend picked up a lovely 16ft dory with a outboard this week for £400 so sea fishing it is in the spring :)

 

Whats peoples favourite techniques on a boat? Im quite rusty at sea fishing all together to be fair and have no idea if i have sea legs lol

 

Sterl

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I'm only an occasional sea angler, but you'll be inshore in that rig, I'd mostly be looking at fishing little feathers with a little pirk instead of a lead, you could chuck rubber lures or metal spinners and spoons about for Pollack and Bass, or you could fish at anchor with bait. :)

Stay safe, the sea will fuck you up if you don't respect it. :yes:

 

Edited by Captain Bonglington
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Depends where you are fishing, what you are fishing over, state of tide and what you are after really. I like to have a few rods in and fish on the drift. One with a paternoster over the side to pick up bream or whatever, feathers over the other for mackerel etc that I swap for a smoothound rig when my arm gets tired or I've got too many in the bucket, and a couple of shark rods out the back and a big bucket of rubby dubby. Couple of beers and a cheeky bifter and your day is set :)

 

I have also totally converted to circle hooks for pretty much everything but mackerel now. Its so much easier, especially if you're out on the sharks. Get some gemini clips for swapping rigs out quickly, and a very wide selection of leads right up to the big ones for heavy tides.

 

Get a decent radio, flares and a life jacket though mate. If in doubt - don't go out. Things can get very shit very quickly, especially when you're a way out in a small boat.

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Also - you might of only paid £400 for the boat, but wait till the fuel, mooring fees, boat insurance, annual antifoul and storage etc etc etc etc all kick in. Budget a minimum of £1500 annual outlay and you'll not be far wrong.

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18 hours ago, Captain Bonglington said:

I'm only an occasional sea angler, but you'll be inshore in that rig, I'd mostly be looking at fishing little feathers with a little pirk instead of a lead, you could chuck rubber lures or metal spinners and spoons about for Pollack and Bass, or you could fish at anchor with bait. :)

Stay safe, the sea will fuck you up if you don't respect it. :yes:

 

 

We are only planning to go 3-5 mile out. Even that distance scares me lol

 

It sounds like plenty of options though :) Now we got to get the thing sea worthy and build a cab on it ready for spring :)

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17 hours ago, FarmerPalmersNT said:

Also - you might of only paid £400 for the boat, but wait till the fuel, mooring fees, boat insurance, annual antifoul and storage etc etc etc etc all kick in. Budget a minimum of £1500 annual outlay and you'll not be far wrong.

 

It's stored in my friends garden so luckily a tad cheaper for him ( Hes in his 70s and never stops with hobbies etc) 

 

So far it needs £200 in work to get cleaned up and anti fouled etc. Its a really nice triple  hull that will plain beautiful with a 20hp on. Most boats i have seen the same style have been a few k.

 

I will have  to ask him what it comes in at all in as if i get a taste for it i want a 22ft myself and ill use it as a caravan aswell lol

 

There is some awesome bargain boats out there if you dont mind tidying up etc

Edited by sterling-archer
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17 hours ago, FarmerPalmersNT said:

 

Get a decent radio, flares and a life jacket though mate. If in doubt - don't go out. Things can get very shit very quickly, especially when you're a way out in a small boat.

 

Best bit of advice so far. :yes:

3-5 miles out is a long way in a little boat, not sure I'd be comfortable with that in a 16 foot dory.

Things can indeed go to shit very quickly. My mate has a 10' speedboat with a 40 horse engine on, we take it off the coast of Pembrokeshire every now and then.

It's loads of fun, you spend more time in the air than on the water, one day we hit a wave with the bow of the boat down, in a second the boat was filling with freezing water and we were instantly in a slight pickle.....we got round the headland and bailed it out, but it wouldn't have taken much more to sink us.

Last spring I was out on my kayak, and he was on his boat....coming up to high tide the swell grew, as you'd expect....I was fine on my yak, I surfed back in, but he had a nightmare getting the boat back on the trailer in the surf, the boat ended up sideways across the trailer, full of water, with the contents of the boat floating in the ocean, and a land rover stuck in the shingle getting pounded by surf and stuck down to the axles, unable to pull the now really heavy boat....carnage.

Just a couple of examples of how quickly things can go from fun to dangerous at sea, it's not to be fucked with. :)

There are loads of bargain boats about, it's when you start to do the work, and put engines, and steering rigs, and electrics on the costs mount up.

BOAT- Break Out Another Thousand. 

Edited by Captain Bonglington
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Those hulls are great but can get a bit 'slappy'. 20hp is ok, I've got a 30 on a 18ft with cabin but more is better when your pushing against the tide especially laden up. 20hp might struggle to plane even on a cathedral hull. It's not fun trying to push a planing hull thats not planing through the water when underpowered and fighting the tide, not to mention costly in fuel. I definitely need more on mine.

 

I did have mine on the drive and launched every time but soon got really, really pissed off with that. Towing and moving trailers, then parking is horrid. I'd recommend a mooring if you can get it.

 

I go about 5-10 miles out. Have had a fair few hairy moments, mostly my fault and could have been avoided with common sense.

Edited by FarmerPalmersNT
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And yeah, paid less than a grand for mine, but the cost of the boat is not the main expense sadly. Nothing beats a day out on the sea away from everyone though!!

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Some good advice given ^^^   only thing i would add, is fish to a mark. Look at charts for reefs etc. Ask locals, in tackle shops, and online. No point just going out randomly and hoping for the best, the sea's a big place and there aint as many fish as there used to be.

 

I'm a fair weather fisherman lol but I've been caught out in sea mist while on my kayak a couple of times, and it was fecking scarey. Went from a beautiful sunny day, to not being able to see the end your boat in an instant. Luckily we were close in and just hugged the rocks, but i feel like we were lucky  :yep:

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I do beach combing at night and i have seen some wild changes so have alot of respect for the sea myself.Im actually scared shitless of its power to be fair lol

 

Some good wanings here and rightly so. The area we will be out in is full of dredgers/right on a port and gets regular traffic so we thankfully won't be alone out there. Regardless im brushing up on my swimming and doing alot of research. 

 

My friend has flare guns, life jackets, radio, gps and fish finder etc. Hes also going on a course over winter to brush up himself as he has only had inflatables and his kayak up until now despite doing alot of boat restos

 

My phone is fully waterproof luckily so its always a  backup gps unit aswell. 

 

Gotta respect the sea :)

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Another top tip is the navionics for android. I get the UK and Holland one for about £30 I think. It's better than most plotters. And always check the inshore waters map on the met office site, plus the wind, tides and general outlook. Don't just rely on your eyes!

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I know this is an old post, but I thought I'd add to it. I have an 18ft coble 3with an old 30hp 2-stroke, which I launch off the beach. I have all the safety gear with auto-distress signaling etc, but I still stay within sight of land so I can get back in quickly. I was caught out when the weather turned once (no met office warning from coastguard on radio) and only just made it back. I know it won't go down well here but the boat's about the only place I don't (or allow mates to ) smoke weed. You've got to be 100% together, as things happen so quickly. If  I go overboard at full speed I don't want a stoner trying to find me in a swell, especially one who's forgotten to hit the MOB button on the GPS. 

You can get a waterproof personal radio for £100, and don't forget a compass, I've got Navionics on my phone and tablet but wouldn't go out without one.

Brushing upon your swimming is the wrong approach, concentrate on not ending up in the water. Even with a lifejacket you won't survive long in the water, most of the year.

In a 16ft open boat I'd stay in estuaries,  or hug the coast. I tend to drift, fishing lures for pollock and bass. Once you go offshore you need to find the marks to find any fish at all, plus in a 30HP it's easy to burn £50 of fuel skooting around.

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