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Lancaster8

The properties of calcified seaweed and liquid seaweed nutrients

I have become confused about seaweed products.  One ebay seller has a calcified seaweed product that I might have considered adding to a soil mix. I also already have some liquid seaweed (which I haven't started yet) that can be either added as a soil nutrient or as a foliar spray.  

 

I am now going down the road of generating a "living soil" which is full of bacteria and enzymes and will be using worm leachate to reinforce that.  

 

My question is one that I haven't been able to find the answer to on the internet:   Sellers of liquid seaweed products tell us that their products are organic and they all seem very positive for our plants.  However, when I was talking to a seller of calcified seaweed, they said that liquid 

 

seaweed products were detrimental to worms.  If so, would this then mean that they would be detrimental to a living soil full of bacteria?  It seems to go against what I have already seen written. 

 

I'm sure someone will know the answer.

 

Cheers! :unsure:

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32 minutes ago, Lancaster8 said:

I have become confused about seaweed products.  One ebay seller has a calcified seaweed product that I might have considered adding to a soil mix. I also already have some liquid seaweed (which I haven't started yet) that can be either added as a soil nutrient or as a foliar spray.  

 

I am now going down the road of generating a "living soil" which is full of bacteria and enzymes and will be using worm leachate to reinforce that.  

 

My question is one that I haven't been able to find the answer to on the internet:   Sellers of liquid seaweed products tell us that their products are organic and they all seem very positive for our plants.  However, when I was talking to a seller of calcified seaweed, they said that liquid 

 

seaweed products were detrimental to worms.  If so, would this then mean that they would be detrimental to a living soil full of bacteria?  It seems to go against what I have already seen written. 

 

I'm sure someone will know the answer.

 

Cheers! :unsure:

1

I read that at one point as well mate,but I thought it was directed at actual seaweed because of the salt content,But alot of people on here use seaweed meal , And at one time  I used to make my own seaweed tea from seaweed collected from the beach and throw the dregs into my worm bin and my worms went mad for it, I mean left what they were eating to ball round it

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Posted (edited)

I use different forms of the same nutrients like these, for me the key difference is how quickly the nurients become useable by the plants, calcified seaweed is slow release, meal is medium and liquid is fast, so when I flip to flower I don't need to use any seaweed products. I even use hoof and horn (high in nitrogen) in the mix I use for flowering, knowing it will be available to my next crop when I recycle my soil ;)

Edited by Mugwuffin
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Calcified seaweed raises the pH of acidic soils. Not sure about liquid seaweed. 

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21 hours ago, Lancaster8 said:

they said that liquid seaweed products were detrimental to worms.

I've been using kelp/seaweed meal for over 3 years(same soil/pots) and my worm populations are thriving.

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Meal is generally better for worms, it's a food source. They would be unlikely to go near calcified although it's not going to do them any harm. Liquid seaweed (or liquid anything) isn't something I use in my no till. I've very much moved away from anything fast release or that rapidly changes soil chemistry/nutrients. You don't get stable diversity/dynamic equilibrium of sorts by adding sudden influx of sugars/nutrients/food sources.

 

Let the living soil do the breaking down and dissolving and it'll reward you with diversity.

 

Not to say liquid tea doesn't have it's place or that it'll do any major harm, just that I am increasingly of the opinion that it should be gradually reduced to zero. 

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19 minutes ago, FarmerPalmersNT said:

Meal is generally better for worms, it's a food source. They would be unlikely to go near calcified although it's not going to do them any harm. 

 

Yes, I've got some kelp meal which is what I am now going to be using in a new mix.  It is of a similar style to those American mixes where they say they are going to leave it to cook.  I thought that talking about this "cook" was just a phrase. Now I know different. The heat generated when there is living fungi is astonishing. So won't be using this new mix until it is safe.  

 

Currently, I only have one decent plant left, as I have been beset with troubles with just about everything recently.  My only remaining plant is being left outside in a pot, and I intend to let it finish outside rather than bringing it indoors and back into a tent. However, there were roots coming out of the bottom and I had to re-pot it into a bigger pot. Even then I had another disaster.  I carefully tried to release it, and when it finally came out, half of the roots in the lower pot were left behind. :wallbash: 

 

So whereas this plant did have good roots, it has now lost half of them due to re-potting.  When I put it into its bigger new pot, I added a few myco granules first, in the hopes that it might help the roots recover from their ordeal.  One day I might get something right. :unsure:

Right now, I have got no bud in reserve at all, and I am really stressed about that. :thumbdown:

 

Thanks to everyone who has replied! 

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I've never used calcified for a grow but bought a big sack for my allotment. It was veryslow release, there were still granules of it in the soil the next year. It was something of a fad back then, and questions were raised as to whether it actually was seaweed and not in fact old coral. It's dredged from the Channel off Falmouth from stretches of water that would have been shallow enough to support coral, and I'm not sure the chemical composition actually matches seaweed at all.

At least you know where you are with meal, at best calcified is only going to add calcium and there's plenty of cheaper sources of that.

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33 minutes ago, Sasquatch said:

I've never used calcified for a grow but bought a big sack for my allotment. It was veryslow release, there were still granules of it in the soil the next year. It was something of a fad back then, and questions were raised as to whether it actually was seaweed and not in fact old coral. It's dredged from the Channel off Falmouth from stretches of water that would have been shallow enough to support coral, and I'm not sure the chemical composition actually matches seaweed at all.

At least you know where you are with meal, at best calcified is only going to add calcium and there's plenty of cheaper sources of that.

 

Very interesting information!  Thanks for that! :) 

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:cheers:

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Posted (edited)

6 hours ago, Sasquatch said:

I've never used calcified for a grow but bought a big sack for my allotment. It was veryslow release, there were still granules of it in the soil the next year. It was something of a fad back then, and questions were raised as to whether it actually was seaweed and not in fact old coral. It's dredged from the Channel off Falmouth from stretches of water that would have been shallow enough to support coral, and I'm not sure the chemical composition actually matches seaweed at all.

At least you know where you are with meal, at best calcified is only going to add calcium and there's plenty of cheaper sources of that.

 

 

I dunno - its not seaweed at all really, its a kind of coralline algae. It has a range of other trace nutrients too - magnesium, zinc and many other trace. Also adds to the soil structure as it is very slow breakdown. Adds a refugium for some important microbes that play a role in release from minerals and colonise the porous particles too and so is thought to improve microbe-mineral interactions in the soil more widely and thus fertility. Not saying its the wonder additive that it can be sold as, but its certainly of some considerable use. Its doesn't compare with seaweed - meal or otherwise - because it isn't.

 

 

ETA - its also not particularly sustainable as far as I understand due to the destructive method of dredging that can cause incidental damage, although I think that varies. Its a type of coldwater coral with coralline algae attached and the dead beds they dredge build up very, very slowly due to its slow growth.

 

Edited by FarmerPalmersNT
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say's it all....

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