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Werewolves_are_rad

When should I stop feeding & flush?

22 posts in this topic
10 hours ago, unity said:

@MicroDoser interesting opinions, I was always of the thought that curing was just the final part of drying, achieved by slowing down the process to a suitable degree.

 

Robert Connel Clarke says things better than me. Bolding is mine. From 'Marijuana Botany [An Advanced Study - The Propagation And Breeding Of Distinctive Cannabis]

 

Quote
As floral clusters dry, and even after they are sealed and packaged, they continue to cure. Curing removes the unpleasant green taste and allows the resins and cannabinoids to finish ripening. Drying is merely the removal of water from the floral clusters so they will be dry enough to burn. Curing takes this process one step farther to produce tasty and psychoactive marijuana. If drying occurs too rapidly, the green taste will be sealed into the tissues and may remain there indefinitely. A floral cluster is not dead after harvest any more than an apple
is. Certain metabolic activities take place for some time, much like the ripening and eventual spoiling of an apple after it is picked. During this period, cannabinoid acids decarboxylate into the psychoactive cannabinoids and terpenes isomerize to create new polyterpenes with tastes and aromas different from fresh floral clusters. It is suspected that cannabinoid biosynthesis may also continue for a short time after harvest. Taste and aroma also improve as chlorophylls and other pigments begin to break down. When floral clusters are dried slowly they are kept at a humidity very near that of the inside of the stomata. Alternatively, sealing and opening bags or jars of clusters is a procedure that keeps the humidity high within the container and allows the periodic venting of gases given off during curing. It also exposes the clusters to fresh air needed for proper curing.

 

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Cheers @MicroDoser, excellent post bro :)  I might have to take a look into this book.

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With organic nutes flushing isn't needed as you are feeding the micro-herd, not the plant directly, the micro-herd break down the organic matter and the plants feed off this, this is why plants don't respond as quickly to organic nutes as they do to chemical salt based nutes. Not sure what flushing has to do with curing? :unsure: Both have different aims. 

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7 hours ago, Muppet said:

Not sure what flushing has to do with curing? :unsure: Both have different aims. 

 

After looking into the subject, studying root function and how roots uptake nutrients, and reading the latest research, I am very confident that curing and flushing are exactly the same thing. If flushing has an aim separate from curing, then it fails in that aim because it does nothing separate from curing.

 

Now that cannabis is legal in some places, some students are choosing to study cannabis for their masters thesis etc which means actual research is coming out that addresses questions I have had in the past and which are of interest to growers in general, for example is there a difference in yield or quality between daily, every other day, or once every three days watering? Or does flushing actually do anything different when compared to the changes that are a result of curing?

 

Here is the study for anyone interested (PDF Download)

 

Quote
After testing the nutrient concentrations from each treatment from three separate experiments, there were no significant differences in nutrient levels between any treatments within each experiment. This result showed that the intended purpose of flushing to reduce nutrient concentrations within the bud has no effect.

 

Bolding and italics are mine. And here is the graph of lab analysis of the bud tissue from flushed, unflushed, well irrigated (control), and less irrigated buds (mild and moderate stress).

 

jxIEiMx.png

 

To use their terminology, there is no significant differences between any treatments analysed using ANOVA (statistical analysis software) at a significance of p<0.05. Basically flushing does nothing at all, do it if you like, don't do it if you like. It matters not. What matters is that you cure your buds, either during the last few weeks of life by restricting nutrients, or after it is cut.

 

The thing that surprised me was that there was no gain in yield or quality from not flushing. I had suspected that restricting the nutrients to the plant would have reduced yield but this is not the case according to research.

 

To the best of my knowledge, flushing or not flushing results in exactly the same chemical composition in the buds after curing. This suggests to me that it is the curing which is important, not flushing.

 

This in turn suggests to me that flushing is in fact curing.

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2 hours ago, MicroDoser said:

 

After looking into the subject, studying root function and how roots uptake nutrients, and reading the latest research, I am very confident that curing and flushing are exactly the same thing. If flushing has an aim separate from curing, then it fails in that aim because it does nothing separate from curing.

 

Now that cannabis is legal in some places, some students are choosing to study cannabis for their masters thesis etc which means actual research is coming out that addresses questions I have had in the past and which are of interest to growers in general, for example is there a difference in yield or quality between daily, every other day, or once every three days watering? Or does flushing actually do anything different when compared to the changes that are a result of curing?

 

Here is the study for anyone interested (PDF Download)

 

 

Bolding and italics are mine. And here is the graph of lab analysis of the bud tissue from flushed, unflushed, well irrigated (control), and less irrigated buds (mild and moderate stress).

 

jxIEiMx.png

 

To use their terminology, there is no significant differences between any treatments analysed using ANOVA (statistical analysis software) at a significance of p<0.05. Basically flushing does nothing at all, do it if you like, don't do it if you like. It matters not. What matters is that you cure your buds, either during the last few weeks of life by restricting nutrients, or after it is cut.

 

The thing that surprised me was that there was no gain in yield or quality from not flushing. I had suspected that restricting the nutrients to the plant would have reduced yield but this is not the case according to research.

 

To the best of my knowledge, flushing or not flushing results in exactly the same chemical composition in the buds after curing. This suggests to me that it is the curing which is important, not flushing.

If this were true you wouldn't be able to tell flushed weed from unflushed weed, the tell tale 'snap, crackle pop" of burning unflushed weed wouldn' t exist if all was chemically identical. 

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@MicroDoser

 

that is a really interesting study. Thank you for posting. If it’s true then I’ll still be flushing as I’ll be saving on nutrients - especially as it doesn’t effect the final yield much. 

 

Hopefully more studies will suface replicating the results.

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4 hours ago, Muppet said:

the tell tale 'snap, crackle pop" of burning unflushed weed

 

Is not something I have experienced, and I have not flushed for decades. Mind you, I do not give anything except food at the right PH and strength to my plants and I cure my buds. I suspect those little fireworks are caused either by not curing at all (possibly in combination with drying too fast) or by some additive or foliar spray.

 

When was the last time you experienced it? And what was the source of that weed? How was it dried/cured? And what was it fed? were there any foliar sprays?

 

I suspect the answers to those questions would point us in the direction of why it burned like that.

 

If you note what I am saying though, I am not saying that doing a light cure at the end of your grow cycle does nothing, I am saying what it does is nothing more than you can get with a cure after cutting.

 

4 hours ago, assault and battery said:

If it’s true then I’ll still be flushing as I’ll be saving on nutrients - especially as it doesn’t effect the final yield much. 

 

This seems to be the course of action the research suggests. The benefit is you save a small amount of money on nutrients and you do not lose or gain any yield or quality. You get a head start on curing as well. Personally, I always have some nutrient wastage at the end of a cycle so whether I stopped feeding or not, I would not save any nutrients. I also prefer to cure in darkness as this converts the minimum amount of THC to CBN.

 

To get back on topic and answer the question of "When should I stop feeding?"

 

I would give the answer : it does not matter.

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