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Conspiranought

US: 1 in 3 Adults In The U.S. Take Medications That Can Cause Depression

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Americans are increasingly taking multiple drugs. And depression is a potential side effect of many of them.

 

If you take Prilosec or Zantac for acid reflux, a beta blocker for high blood pressure, or Xanax for anxiety, you may be increasing your risk of depression.

More than 200 common medications sold in the U.S. include depression as a potential side effect. Sometimes, the risk stems from taking several drugs at the same time. Now, a new study finds people who take these medicines are, in fact, more likely to be depressed.

The list includes a wide range of commonly taken medications. Among them are certain types of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (used to treat acid reflux), beta blockers, anxiety drugs, painkillers including ibuprofen, ACE inhibitors (used to treat high blood pressure), and anti-convulsant drugs.

"The more of these medications you're taking, the more likely you are to report depression," says study author Mark Olfson, a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University.

The study, which was published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, included 26,192 adults who participated in a federal survey, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. All of the participants listed the medications they were taking at the time of the survey. In addition, they each completed a depression screening, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), which asks about sleep, mood and appetite.

 

More than a third of the people who took the survey were taking medications known to have depression or suicidal thoughts as potential side effects. Olfson and his collaborators wanted to determine whether those participants were more or less likely to be depressed, compared to participants who didn't take any of these medications.

"What we found is that, in fact, they're more likely," Olfson says. And they found that people who took three or more of the medications were three times as likely to be depressed.

 

About 15 percent of participants who simultaneously used three or more of these drugs were depressed. By comparison, among participants who didn't use any of the medications, just 5 percent were depressed. Even those who used just one of these medications were at slightly higher risk of depression: About 7 percent were depressed.

Olfson says the study does not prove that the medications caused the depression. "We're just showing that if you're already taking them, you are more likely to be depressed," he says. To determine causation, he says, researchers would need to follow people over time — beginning at the time they start taking the medications — to see if they're more likely to develop depression.

Nonetheless, Olfson says, he was surprised by the "strength of the association between the number of medications and the likelihood of being depressed."

These findings may motivate people to ask their health care providers more questions. "People should always be ready to ask, 'What are the risks and the benefits of me taking this medication?' " says Don Mordecai, a psychiatrist with Kaiser Permanente in San Jose, Calif. And he says doctors should be ready to have these conversations, too.

Mordecai says, if you start a new medicine it can be helpful to keep track of changes in how you feel.

"People who don't have a history of depression and then, suddenly, start to have symptoms of depression should be concerned that it's potentially due to a side effect, or potentially, an interaction," Mordecai says.

It's also worth having a conversation with your doctor about whether you might be able to stop a medication, Mordecai says. For instance, it may be possible to go off — or reduce — a medication for high blood pressure if you make other changes "such as changing your diet, limiting salt intake, or increasing exercise."

Use of medications with depression or suicidal thoughts as potential side effects has been on the rise, according to the study's lead author, Dima Mazen Qato, an assistant professor at the College of Pharmacy of the University of Illinois, Chicago.

"People are not only increasingly using these medicines alone, but are increasingly using them simultaneously, yet very few of these drugs have warning labels, so until we have public or system-level solutions, it is left up to patients and health care professionals to be aware of the risks," Qato wrote in a release about the study findings.

Qato says physicians may want to consider including evaluations of medications when they screen for depression.

"With depression as one of the leading causes of disability and increasing national suicide rates, we need to think innovatively about depression as a public health issue," Qato writes. She suggests that one strategy to reduce depression rates might be for health care providers to give more thought to the role these medications might play in depression risk.

Allison Aubrey is on Twitter @AubreyNPRFood.

 

Link - https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/06/12/619274492/1-in-3-adults-in-the-u-s-take-medications-that-can-cause-depression

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Posted (edited)

A lot of antidepressants from the prozac generation onwards (including prozac, or fluoxetine) have side effects that include suicidal ideation :headpain:

Edited by Boojum
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11 minutes ago, Boojum said:

A lot of antidepressants from the prozac generation onwards (including prozac, or fluoxetine) have side effects that include suicidal ideation :headpain:

Anticonvulsants are proper terrible for it, I think more awareness needs putting out when it comes to anticonvulsants, especially when it comes to children.

 

I've tried them pretty much all now and I hate them all with a passion but they do work, but in a way they just make some things worse though, which weed helps with, a lot. Which pisses me off because cannabis even counteracts the shitty medication, not just prevents the seizures themself.

 

I feel like fucking clonazepam off, I wouldn't even need to take the shit if I were able to consume CBD consistently. Probably not even have to take the standalone anticonvulsant either (Which I hate even more than benzos).

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I was on carbamazepine for a while - not as an anticonvulsant but as one of the many things that the shrinks have put me on over the years for my manic depression. Didn't help any but didn't have any really noticable side effects either, which puts it head and shoulders above the antipsychotics I've been on lol they didn't help AND had fucking horrible side effects :doh:

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15 minutes ago, Boojum said:

I was on carbamazepine for a while - not as an anticonvulsant but as one of the many things that the shrinks have put me on over the years for my manic depression. Didn't help any but didn't have any really noticable side effects either, which puts it head and shoulders above the antipsychotics I've been on lol they didn't help AND had fucking horrible side effects :doh:

Tbh mate if I'm to stay on both meds and increased one, it would be clonazepam. I have been having partial seizures upon waking up recently so need to ideally up something or do something. I hate being on them but they do work though. Surely anticonvulsants (the standalone ones) can't be good long term either just like clonazepam supposed to be isn't, like on the memory and cognitive functioning side of things etc. Standalone epilepsy meds have been pretty problematic for me, whereas clonazepam has been a walk in the park. 

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Posted (edited)

If they work then they work now, so keep taking them until they stop working (and by working I mean make you feel better) and bugger the long-term I say. A medication is worth taking (in my opinion) if it makes you feel better overall - some meds don't, they make the thing they are supposed to make better feel better (sometimes), but actually make you feel worse overall because of the side effects (which I guess is what the article is about). Fuck that shit, making one thing feel better and something else feel bad, with the net result of you feeling worse is fucking bollocks - that's why I'm unmedicated for my bipolar disorder nowadays, cos the drugs, the antipsychotics and lithium and carbamazepine and all the other shit didn't really help, and most of it had the most horriffic side effects, the 'cure' was worse than the fucking illness :headpain: I guess with physical illness it's different, I can live with my bipolar shit, just go unmedicated cos the meds are all shite, but you can't really do that with epilepsy :(

 

Though I wish I could get a shrink to give me benzos - they work for me when I'm manic, calm my head, bring me back down. But that's not how they (shrinks) work, no benzos for you Mr Boojum, but here's another antipsychotic that may or may have amusing side-effects like tardive dyskinesia or akathisia :doh: JUST GIVE ME SOME FUCKING DOWNERS FOR FUCK'S SAKE lol

 

Sorry, I've had a few ciders.

Edited by Boojum
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interesting,,,but i was looking for part that this was relevant to cannabis news?

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@redbeard sorry mate, I was wondering for quite a bit where to put it and thought most relevant may be here, I was thinking free4all but thought I'd put it here instead. 

 

@Boojum I know some people on antidepressants and it seems that the lethargy side effect plays a huge part in making you even more depressed imo, or from what I see in the people who I now that take them. I know a bodybuilder, a pro one at that too, if I told you his name and you googled it you'd find a ton of pics and information on him. He had to stop training due to an injury and went years on antidepressants, barely training and went fat. He's quite on in age now like but he decided to do TRT for the rest of his life now (testosterone replacement therapy) at a dose so he has the same test levels as a young man who is at natural levels. he's been able to ditch the antidepressants and is living a much much more normal life now.

 

We aren't in the 60's, man ;) Can't get the mothers little helpers willy nilly anymore, they're very strict with all benzos now as you probably know why. They're given for alcohol withdrawal but might not prescribe benzos to somebody who is known to drink. Like they say on the package leaflet on lots of drugs with potential for abuse "Do not take if you have a history of drug abuse". Plus it is very possible for CNS depression to happen to a dangerous point while mixing the two.

 

As addictive as they are, they're not even as harsh to live with taking as some of the other stuff which are supposedly 'non-addictive or recreational' like the standalone seizure meds and bipolar meds. I tried one but for epilepsy which was lamotrigine, fucking hated it. 

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Sadly, doctors turn to pills as a miracle cure for too many things.

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We've seen 6 dr!s recently about Mrs twigs illness and they have all said different things!

 

they know fuck all, full on incompetent chancers 

 

probably get a better diagnosis from a plumber! 

 

 

 

 

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Hi corck1968


Sadly, doctors turn to pills as a miracle cure for too many things.


Hear Hear :yep:


All they do is make everyone into a...


Zombie By Bad Wolves (Rock fusion 2018) 

 

 

Bongme :yinyang:

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