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Fragg

Don’t Knock a Strong Pot Tolerance, It Could Help You Heal

32 posts in this topic

Cannabis tolerance — the gradual acclimation to the sensory impacts of use — is usually framed in a negative light; something to be avoided or remedied. But being able to handle larger doses of cannabinoids can actually mean increased medical benefits.


Cannabis has a bad reputation when it comes to building up tolerance. Countless articles describe the problem: you start using cannabis and it works great, but after a few weeks you find you need more. You increase your dose, only to soon find that this new dose is also insufficient — it just doesn’t get you ‘high’ the same way.

 

The prescription for this problem is usually to go on a tolerance break, a few weeks where you stop using cannabis and let your system reset. When you go back to using cannabis again, your tolerance will be back down to where you started. The message being communicated is clear: tolerance isn’t something you want to have.

But developing a cannabis tolerance isn’t all bad. For many, especially medical patients, it is a crucial factor in their cannabis use. Many medical patients starting cannabis worry about side effects like difficulty thinking, problems with memory or lack of coordination. One of the great benefits of developing a tolerance to cannabis is that many of these side effects go away: Studies show chronic cannabis users do not suffer from the same disorienting effects that leave occasional users unable to do everyday tasks, such as driving).

I saw this firsthand as a cannabis patient. For me, cannabis was always disorienting. It wasn’t a bad thing, but it did make it impossible to get much done while under the influence.

I remember marveling at a close friend and classmate who could smoke throughout the day while remaining completely normal. He would go to class, have complex conversations about analytic philosophy, work on his doctorate — all while using cannabis.

When I asked him about it he explained that he had a high tolerance. He was just used it.

At that time, I was dealing with intense chronic pain and missing a lot of school and work due to these struggles. Cannabis helped, but I was only using it at night, when I didn’t have any work to do. It was like a time-out from the pain, but it didn’t help me with the real problem — my inability to work when I was in pain.

My friend suggested something that ran counter to everything I had read  — I should build up my tolerance.

“Smoke right before you write that paper” he suggested. “It will be weird for a few days, but then you’ll be used to it”.

To my surprise, he was right. Within a week of starting to use cannabis during my regular work and school activities, I was no longer feeling the disorienting side effects. I was free. While I still got relief from my pain and anxiety, I was thinking clearly and felt… normal.

While I worried my tolerance building would lead to continual increases in use, at a certain point my tolerance increases seemed to plateau: I have been on a relatively stable dose for the last five years. If I use the same strain of cannabis for too long, I develop a tolerance to that strain and need to switch it up to keep getting relief. Otherwise I haven’t experienced any tolerance-related problems and always avoid taking tolerance breaks now.

While tolerance breaks are fantastic for recreational users or those with occasional medical needs, I never suggest them for medical patients who have chronic issues they are managing. Just like you would be unlikely to have a doctor suggest you take a few weeks off from an antidepressant or a heart medication, if you are using cannabis for daily medical needs, interrupting this can be disruptive and confusing for your body. And of course, any symptoms you were managing will no longer be getting the help they need.

Still, last summer, I was forced to take a tolerance break: I got a lung infection (unrelated to the cannabis) which was aggravated by smoke, so I spent months unable to use my medicine.

When I started to smoke again a few months later, my tolerance was back at its starting point and I experienced tolerance free cannabis use again. I was totally useless! So, I spent the next few weeks building my tolerance back up. Only then was I able to again use cannabis effectively as medicine.

I thought I might be able to use a lower dose after such a long break, but I quickly found myself back at that stable dose I had been using for years. For all the discomfort of the break, it turned out that I did best on the dose I had already been on.

While tolerance breaks are great for some (and there are certainly medical and recreational users alike who swear by them), for others developing and keeping a certain level of tolerance may be the better route. This can vary drastically from person to person based on their needs and biochemistry.

As a patient consultant, I often work with clients to track their cannabis experiences in a journal. Looking back over a few weeks of entries, many of them are able to better understand what is working for them and what isn’t.

TELL US, has tolerance affected your cannabis experience?

 

 

https://cannabisnow.com/dont-knock-strong-pot-tolerance-help-heal/

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Top stuff @Fragg

I would have to agree with the conclusions , this year will be my 40th as a cannabis smoker and I have smoked and worked without issue throughout my career (chronic pain from sports injuries).

 

Hope you're keeping well my friend and ATB for 2018 

:yinyang:

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5 minutes ago, Breezus said:

Top stuff @Fragg

I would have to agree with the conclusions , this year will be my 40th as a cannabis smoker and I have smoked and worked without issue throughout my career (chronic pain from sports injuries).

 

Hope you're keeping well my friend and ATB for 2018 

:yinyang:

 

Hehe its my 40th year too mate so I raise a spliff to you and to our next 40 :smokin: Without cannabis my chronic pain would have meant I would have had to stop work instead I paid of my mortgage early thanks to working as a web designer in the evenings on top of my day job, despite that meaning I worked over 100 hours a week back then. Every web site and programming were all done whilst "inspired" by our favourite plant too! :skin_up:Lazy cannabis smokers? Have they seen how industrious we become when it comes to growing some ganja? lol

 

Tolerance breaks are for wimps :badass:lol

 

ATB to you too my friend I hope you have a great year ahead:oldtoker:

 

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i remember that program on tele years ago where they got the fella to drive a course in a car soba. then try it again after a spliff. and he was on the ball driving after. i am the same. lol 

what program was it now ? was it top gear lol :unsure:

 

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tolerance break fuck that shit .

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:flex:

 

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I've often wondered how much of a factor, the amount I smoke and have done for over 30 years, has been in my unusually good health, contrary to everything and everyone other than this article.

:smokin:

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My tolerance is through the roof atm, spent a few days in amsterdam over new years and been off work with an injury so been smoking loads, helps pass the time. took a few months off in 2016 and had horrible withdrawal symptoms, sweats, chills, insomnia, lack of appetite and felt depressed for some time but i had other shit going on. even if i have a night off i get all sweaty and can't sleep.

when i speak to other people about withdrawal they think i'm crazy. anybody else experience anything similar?

Edited by artyb

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love smoking throughout curing, bud and hash just get better  even though I smoke all day everyday it still catches me everyday.

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love smoking throughout curing, bud and hash just get better  even though I smoke all day everyday it still catches me everyday.

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2 minutes ago, artyb said:

My tolerance is through the roof atm, spent a few days in amsterdam over new years and been off work with an injury so been smoking loads, helps pass the time. took a few months off in 2016 and had horrible withdrawal symptoms, sweats, chills, insomnia, lack of appetite and felt depressed for some time but i had other shit going on. even if i have a night off i get all sweaty and can't sleep.

when i speak to other people about withdrawal they think i'm crazy. anybody else experience anything similar?

 

I've heard loads claim similar over the years.  The kids mum still swears blind she's "physically addicted" to weed despite my completely debunking her countless times.

 

And theres obviously no way I can disprove or argue with how you feel, they're your feelings after all, and everyone is different.  

 

I can only reiterate that there is no evidence whatsoever to support the notion that cannabis is physically addictive. (Certainly nothing conclusive unless your happy to draw conclusions from what is anecdotal (at best, or imagined at worse).

That doesn't mean I deny yr symptoms or disbelieve what you say.

 

Regular use is certainly habit forming.  And all of us can become psychologically dependent on all sorts of stuff.

 

I would venture that what you're experiencing are more likely to be the physical manifestations of a psychological dependence.  A kind of placebo effect created by the mind.

 

That said, I'm not a doctor nor do I consider myself qualified to judge anybodys personal experiences.

 

I can only say that having gone through a long physical addiction and the subsequent withdrawals, I have never experienced anything near that level of discomfort during periods of abstaining from herb.

 

Even having undergone a detox and knowing for certain that the physical aspect of that addiction is over, I still experience occasional physical discomfort which my unconscious mind automatically connects with withdrawal.  In those moments I have to remind myself that I am not physically addicted any more despite a still keen mental urge to partake.  Once you except those feelings aren't related to the addiction it gets easier to go through the process of elimination required to correctly diagnose the reason behind yr discomfort.

 

That's only my experience and my opinion though,and your welcome to take as much or as little from it as you like.

 

It might be worth remembering that claims of physical dependance do very little for the anti prohibition causes worldwide, Indeed they just provide the prohibitionist with more fuel to add to the fire..

 

Until there is hard evidence of these claims then its nothing more than perpetuation of a myth.

 

Best regards

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" Tolerance ".........what I have if I have weed......:stoned:

 

" Intolerance ".......:frown: :angry::furious:  :taz:

 

lollol

 

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I'm not perpetuating any myths here mate, i'm just sharing my experiences of cannabis withdrawal.

 

I think it's important to note that because something is only addictive on a psychological level doesn't mean you can't have physical withdrawal symptoms, therefore id like to distinguish between physical dependence and physical withdrawal effects.

 

If the drug affects your body on a physical level or at a chemical level there is opportunity for withdrawal symptoms. For example, and perhaps the easiest to explain, is the excessive salivation that i experience if i go without smoking after a period of heavy smoking. One of the side effects i suffer most from is dry mouth. the body responds by increasing the size of the saliva glands which is homeostasis.

 

any drug that is abused and affects your dopamine levels can leave users feeling depressed for a period after use. thc takes a long tiime to get out the system so withdrawal effects aren't immediate like with other drugs with a shorter half life.

 

Cannabis' ability to disrupt sleep is well documented now and a potential explanation for sweats is the body detoxing and trying to remove excess thc stored in fat cells in the body. 

 

@Dodgee

Edited by artyb
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Im having a weed free january, after smoking daily for the best part of 5 years, its a breeze no 'withdrawl symptoms' at all.Still got a jar full and not been tempted at all.tis all in your mind.............imo.

 

 

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@artyb

Please don't assume I'm being dismissive of yr experience or observations.

Maybe I didn't make myself clear but I certainly agree that there is the possibility that people may experience physical symptoms of withdrawal despite it not being recognised as a physical addiction.

I wouldn't want to appear condescending nor would I claim to be better informed than the next man.

In the interest of balance I think its fair to point out all the symptoms you listed above could be caused a vast multitude of ailments.

And all of them can be experienced while still consuming our favorite erb.

 

Hell I got a dry mouth now and I'm positive that's its directly linked to the bong I smoked 2mins ago lol

 

As with everything in life its largely subjective.

 

If your sure yr symptoms are a direct result of withdrawals and yr comfortable with that then the best thing I can suggest is to buy a bigger tent and pop some more beans.

No run out. No withdrawal. Simples.

 

Nice1 D

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