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bobbles

Bread making in UK

97 posts in this topic

Oooh a bread thread wicked i used to make almost all my own bread and use a crappy part bake in reserve lol i love the nutty seedy loafs myself but plain brown is like cardboard to me,i dont eat as much bread as i used too but the ones ive not really done are the ones i love the most flatbreads,pittas,roti and them posh all butter french croissants.

 

Anybody with some great recipes for authentic west indian,or indian breads please share your secrets 

 

peace

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@Happy Hippy in that case I'll have to dig out me ould naan bread recipe.

It's a good one.

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Yesterdays cooking adventures didn't go well man. Garlic doesn't work in a honey mustard sauce and fillet steak in a baggette with cheese is a waste of good steak. Couldn't taste the steak. That's the first and last time I mix garlic with honey and mustard. That doesn't work at all. lol

 

If I figure out a way to get steak in a loaf of bread I'll let you know. It's in  my mind now so I'll probably try it next time I make some bread. ;)

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use pastrami layered in the dough, then roll it up like a spliff and bake 'dat shizzle at 220c

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I generally make most of our bread here. But we've just moved and I have yet to unpack all my baking stuff. As soon as I do, I shall recommence bread baking. I love to bake with sourdough, which I make myself. I don't really like buying-in starters. If I can't get yeast from thin air, I'll buy it fresh where possible.

 

You just can't whack a fresh home baked and still warm sourdough loaf, I'm telling you!

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I've just done a batch of dough and half of it is proving in little barms at the moment . I've put the other half in the fridge for proving and baking tomorrow. I usually find that dough left in fridge overnight before proving and baking tastes better. Does anyone else find this or am I imagining it? 

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1 hour ago, sam-i-am said:

I've just done a batch of dough and half of it is proving in little barms at the moment . I've put the other half in the fridge for proving and baking tomorrow. I usually find that dough left in fridge overnight before proving and baking tastes better. Does anyone else find this or am I imagining it? 

 

I've never tried doing that. I prove mine in warmth. I can see how that could be true though. I'll remember to try that next time. :yep:

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12 minutes ago, Blayz'd said:

 

I've never tried doing that. I prove mine in warmth. I can see how that could be true though. I'll remember to try that next time. :yep:

 

I do the final proving in warmth so I get that nice soft texture but chucking it in the fridge overnight before then so that the yeast slows down seems to give a better flavour. 

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5 hours ago, sam-i-am said:

I've just done a batch of dough and half of it is proving in little barms at the moment . I've put the other half in the fridge for proving and baking tomorrow. I usually find that dough left in fridge overnight before proving and baking tastes better. Does anyone else find this or am I imagining it? 

For sure, and absolutely not.

It's basically more fermentation = better flavour and more easilydigested. So you ideally want a slow steady proof and cooling it slows the process down.

 

I love proper bread , and we've also kept a sourdough culture alive for a good long time in the past.

The other thing that is often well overlooked in most bought bread is the colour (and taste) of the crust. Proper sourdough( and bread generally) is much much better with a dark crust, not a golden one, in my opinion .

 

 

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On 8/25/2017 at 5:02 PM, bobbles said:

Most bread manufactured in this country is made using a method called the 'Chorleywood Process' (CWP). First developed in the early 1960s, the CWP has reduced a major staple food of the UK to a tasteless pap that has more additives in it than are declared on the packaging, some of which are of untraceable provenance (through the pooling process of emzyme developer's resourcing methods) and others that are deemed to have been 'consumed' in the chemical intensive bread making process.

The rise of the CWP has coincided with the rise of a number of digestive problems being diagnosed up and down the country (including Coeliac Disease and wheat intolerance).

I recommend that as many people as possible bake their own. I started making my own a few years ago and would say that it has markedly increased the quality of my, and my family's lives.

 

As a result of CWP, bread in the UK is among the cheapest  available in Europe but bread consumption in the UK is also among the lowest in the UK. Isn't there a lesson to be learnt here?

Chorleywood method was developed principally to make the whole bread making process quicker. Industrial yeasts were added and the environment changed, so the bread would rise much quicker, therefore, the same factory footprint would produce much more loaves. Many of the health/gut issues are related to the yeasts, they're fast acting, not slower (Like Sourdough). 

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So it sounds like I need to get a sourdough starter on the go, what would be the best way to gather the natural yeast?

 

basically guys I'm clueless I have tried before but I don't think it ever got going and just went off.

 

Any tried and tested methods ?

 

peace!

 

lil d.

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I virtually grew up in a familly run bakery with coal fired ovens...... ahh happy days :D

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I have worked in bakeries for over 10 years and one thing i have learned don’t eat the brown bread.

My Grandma was a baker her house was always a fantastic aroma.Being a war widow and a single parent she had to make extra money by baking wedding cakes harvest bread (with little mice on)piccalilli,pies, jam and about anything else she could make a quid out off.

 As kids she would send us out for firewood (for the range)and blackberries and mushrooms then she would make us home made ice cream, she never had any money but buckets full of love.

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what's wrong with the brown bread?

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@lildaveham, Hi mate, I can let you have my Sourdough recipe if you want? Its dead easy to follow, and almost foolproof. Or maybe, if folks would enjoy it, I could do a sourdough bake thread here on UK420?

 

@splifi, Why don't you eat Brown bread? I love it, and Wholemeal too; but I think a malted Granary type loaf is possibly my favourite. Apart from a decent white Sourdough with a strong acidic note to the taste, and which has that gorgeous chewy texture, especially when toasted! Damn it, I wish I knew where I packed all the baking stuff!! This bakery bread is killing me. It may be "Artisan", but I think they forgot the letter "F" from the beginning! :rofl:

 

Some sourdough pics for you:

 

gallery_127_1039_217587.jpeg

gallery_127_1039_224539.jpeggallery_127_1039_71969.jpeg

gallery_127_1039_125072.jpeg

 

lol I'm bloody starving now. Hmmmm.... what's in the cupboards I wonder.......

 

Edit, to add: About that dough-in-the-fridge-overnight thing: Its a brilliant tip. For me the golden rule in bread baking has to be: TSTT, The Slower, The Tastier!

Edited by Arnold Layne
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