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Gimps

wood for burning.

39 posts in this topic

@j.o.i.n.t.....My "sheds" are a ramshackle collection of bits of old timber cobbled together with a tin roof, one is a big crate that a load of laurels were supplied in,  I cut the front off and stuck a corrugated plastic roof on....instant woodshed! lol 

Pallet loads, not sure......looking at your photo, if I had three of those rows I'd be happy I think.  :yep:

The back boiler on the Rayburn is a brilliant little system. The rads it feeds are pissing in the wind a bit really, too small and in pointless places. The main bonus is the hot water, as long as the Rayburn is going it's free hot water, and we save by not having to switch on the dreaded immersion heater. Also the Rayburn is lovely to cook on, if you're starting from scratch the oven takes a mere four hours to get up to temperature.....:rolleyes:

I struggle to keep the Rayburn lit overnight, it seems to have a bit of a draw even when shut down, so we don't run it all the time. I need to get my head round it this winter as it's a great bit of kit, I'd like to run it 24/7 ideally, it does go through the wood though. 

I'd avoid wood burners with back boilers from what I've seen. My mate next door has that system, it provides hot water and feeds the rads....trouble is, as the rads are hot, with a good fire going it's too hot....but just ticking over by the time the boiler has had its share of the heat the flue is too cool, so he struggles with the chimney getting badly tarred up. We've identical lined burner chimneys, mine takes about half an hour and yields a bucket load of fine soot, his takes two hours, lots of chemicals and a power whip and needs doing twice as often, with big lumps of shit coming out of it. It's a nightmare, and a chimney fire waiting to happen. (Again.) The Rayburn has an unlined chimney and doesn't seem to have the same issue.

It's a fantastic system if you can get it to work. :yep:

One of the reasons I buy/barter some wood in is so I've lots of straight stuff to make my splitting life easy.....I can do a pickup load in an hour or so after work, so it doesn't use up too much of my spare time.

I'm terrible for chucking the ugly bits to one side, I've got a big "too hard pile" at the moment that I simply can't be arsed to process. lol

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Thanks, @Captain Bonglington. All useful info to me, and have been mulling over the thought of preparing the amounts of wood you indicate. I think I could do that, if I spread the work out properly; approach it more as an aspect of lifestyle - do a bit a day - rather than as a body of physical work to complete, as I approach it now.

 

I've done 4 pallets, which is looking like it for this year... Mainly got knotty shit left, but not just from this year but all the years since we got the burner (5:blushing:). I don't think I can avoid it any more. Going to do the cutting discs thing with the chainsaw, and leave it till the end of winter. Not really looking forward to it, but there's too much heat in there to ignore.

 

...anyway, thanks again. :yep:

 

 

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@j.o.i.n.t, yeah, that's the way to do it really. I ended up splitting mine over a short period of time this year, but if you can do a bit little and often it's surprising how quickly it builds up. I'm planning on building another big shed so I can have a load in reserve, it would be nice to be a year ahead in case of injury or whatever.

Have you tried one of those wood grenades? They can be handy for the knottier stuff. Or sometimes on bigger rings of wood we'll bore a slot in with the saw then drive a wedge in, pops them open a treat usually. :yes:

I've lit my burner this evening, I was trying to wait as long as I could but I've failed badly. :rolleyes:

 

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For the really knotty and wide rings, what I do is pour water over them on a hard frost and they crack open . Have to stop swinging at the same piece over and over .Someday I'll get one of those pneumatic or hydraulic splitters. Mind your shoulders fellas .

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@Michael Luchóg, do you wait until it's had a frost in it for a few days then pour warm or cold water on? :unsure: Not heard of that before, good tip if it works though! :yep:

I've got an electric/hydraulic splitter, a little "woodbuster" thing... I rarely use it, but I remember splitting a load of knotty old Apple with it and being impressed at the stuff it would break. :yes: It's painfully slow though, I'm not the most patient person, I'd rather flail at it with an axe while cursing and swearing....lol

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Ah yeah ,jostle the machine out of the way ! Just water,it'll get into the wood ,expand as ice and hey presto.

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9 hours ago, Michael Luchóg said:

For the really knotty and wide rings, what I do is pour water over them on a hard frost and they crack open . Have to stop swinging at the same piece over and over .Someday I'll get one of those pneumatic or hydraulic splitters. Mind your shoulders fellas .

 

Liking this thought - makes sense. If we actually get a hard frost this year I'll try it :yep:

 

When I started out I'd pound, and pound - almost take it personal if I couldn't break a bit. Now, though, I can pretty much tell on the first hit...it's the sound, isn't it? Quite metaphorical, in truth - other aspects of my lifestyle and outlook have taken a similar turn over this 5 years, too. Some dragons have to be walked away from, and defeat admitted, if they are even tackled at all, I've learned. Can't slay 'em all.

 

 

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Love a bit of log splitting when me backs good, you can take out so many frustrations. Can't wait to get the burner fired up, sure it was chilly enough this morning lol 

I'm pretty lucky with my supply, in that I know a friendly tree surgeon who like to barter :thumsup:

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On 03/09/2017 at 6:17 AM, j.o.i.n.t said:

 

When I started out I'd pound, and pound - almost take it personal if I couldn't break a bit. Now, though, I can pretty much tell on the first hit...it's the sound, isn't it?

Yep. :yes:

If you hear a nice crisp crack, even if you haven't got it first time there's hope.....a dull thud and the axe bouncing back doesn't bode well.....

Where you hit it makes a huge difference too, or even which way up you put the wood.

I run a three strikes and you're out rule generally, no point in twatting it until you're bollocksed if you've a load to get through.

 

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