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Gimps

wood for burning.

39 posts in this topic

It's a good site for advice that is, I've linked folks to it before....

To be honest, in my experience all wood is good (in a burner, you don't want spitty stuff like Thuja on your open fire) as long as it's dry and you get the chimney swept regularly, every three months here.

The only thing I won't bother burning is Poplar, as it's not worth the effort to split it.

In my wood basket next to me now, I have Ash, Lawson and Leyland Cypress, Sycamore, Tree of Heaven and Beech.

It all burns, just with different degrees of heat and longevity.

If you're buying it, go with Ash or Beech, beware Beech a little as it takes at least a year to dry.

Edited by Captain Bonglington
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I have to say I disagree with their grading of alder and larch. Great firewood said far as I'm concerned. Alder is a cracker too, loves wet feet and fixes nitrogen. 

 

Also, if you're burning hawthorn, stop.

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@Cambium, why not Hawthorn mate? It burns long and hot.

I like Larch for kindling, it catches easily and burns ferociously. Edit to add, we've had an "incident" or two burning Larch on site, including one time we nearly set a whole wooded bank on fire years ago, a blown ember on dry Larch and it's off!

I don't think I've burned any Alder yet.

Edited by Captain Bonglington

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ive got a load of wood outside in logs but i think its poplar, it came from some small christmas tree looking things in my garden. You say this is no good? Is that because of the oil it contains?

Edited by Blaze_One

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It's just of really low caloric value mate, it generates little heat and burns very quickly.

It also fucking stinks, both live and when burned, an acrid smell that catches your eyes and throat.

Poplars don't look like Christmas trees though! That's a Norway Spruce traditionally. Spruce is ok, it's good for getting the burner going. Bit of softwood on first, then on with the hardwoods.

I wouldn't burn it exclusively, but mixed in you'll be ok.

It will be spitty though, I wouldn't recommend softwood for an open fire.

Edited by Captain Bonglington
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14 minutes ago, Captain Bonglington said:

@Cambium, why not Hawthorn mate? It burns long and hot.

I like Larch for kindling, it catches easily and burns ferociously.

I don't think I've burned any Alder yet.

 

I'm just being pretentious mate. It is a great firewood. I just steer clear of long slow growers and chances are it's come out of a hedge and they're getting thin on the ground. It's better off in a local turners woodstore,  than in the fire in reckon, same with anything dense like that, holly, box, laburnum.

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Aye, that's what I though you were going to say mate, and rightly so. :yep:

I just wondered if there was another reason I was unaware of.

I burn very little Hawthorn, but occasionally we might fell a garden tree or hedge, it is fantastic firewood.

The graining in Laburnum can be amazing, I've made a key holder from a piece that had grown in a spiral around another stem, you can get lost in it, it's almost psychedelic. Much sanding and a bit of Danish oil brings it up a treat. :)

Edited by Captain Bonglington
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22 minutes ago, Captain Bonglington said:

It's just of really low caloric value mate, it generates little heat and burns very quickly.

It also fucking stinks, both live and when burned, an acrid smell that catches your eyes and throat.

Poplars don't look like Christmas trees though! That's a Norway Spruce traditionally. Spruce is ok, it's good for getting the burner going. Bit of softwood on first, then on with the hardwoods.

I wouldn't burn it exclusively, but mixed in you'll be ok.

It will be spitty though, I wouldn't recommend softwood for an open fire.

 

Cheers mate, im starting to run low on hard wood so i best stock up before i use this other stuff.

 

This stuff has got a reddy brown bark and looks like it has sap or oil coming out of the rings, do you know how long it should be seasoned for? and does it have to be covered for it to season effectively? 

Edited by Blaze_One

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Sounds Sprucey to me, is the bark smoothish, or flakey? It could be Pine, I like to burn a bit of Pine, instant heat. Beware of putting too much on at once!

A year is enough to season most, if not all woods, although it does depend on the conditions you store it in.

Split it first, then ideally stack it loosely in a dry place with good airflow. If you're keeping it outdoors, cover it with a tarp, but set it up so you still have airflow, otherwise it will just fester and go mouldy.

Ash on the other hand, I split into thin slabs, and after 3 months in the shed its good to go.

The thing you need to remember, is that wood will assimilate its water content to the humidity of the atmosphere around it. Some websites might say your wood should be 5-7% moisture, but if you live in a high humidity area, as I do, at the bottom of a valley, you're simply not going to achieve that. My firewood is at about 15% no matter the type of timber or the seasoning time.

You can buy a moisture meter very cheaply by the way.

Edited by Captain Bonglington
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I've just been reading some of those firewood ratings, I'm struggling to work out how Elm is 140% water.... :rofl:

 

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If it burns it go's in my stove up to and including old boots clothes and carpet cut offs lol once my stove gets going its like a furnace and eats anything that gets thrown in even tins disappear lol

 

 

Edit to correct the phones auto correct lol

Edited by hazy harry
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normally have a trot up the woods for the cut down/fallen logs, its a shame to see them just left there why not make use of them

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2 hours ago, rat in a hat said:

normally have a trot up the woods for the cut down/fallen logs, its a shame to see them just left there why not make use of them

 

Aside from the actual trees that make up the woodland, there isn't anything that is more ecologically beneficial than fallen/snapped deadwood. It's the keystone to a healthy woodland IMO.

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1 hour ago, Cambium said:

 

Aside from the actual trees that make up the woodland, there isn't anything that is more ecologically beneficial than fallen/snapped deadwood. It's the keystone to a healthy woodland IMO.

 

I agree, though I think it's fact more so than opinion really? Nutrient recycling and all that. I read somewhere once that rainforest soils, contrary to what one might think, are actually pretty poor soils in the nutrient department. What keeps the system running is the decomposition of deadwood, the vast majority of nutrients are locked up in the living organisms. Have to say though, I'm guilty of a bit of foraging myself, especially in the Summer for bbq's, none of that shop bought charcoal shite for me, once you've used real wood to cook you're food then food cooked on manufactured charcoal will never taste as appealing :v:

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