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ganjagollum

Amending clay soil for 2017

27 posts in this topic

Hello people of uk420!

I've recently found two great plots in between a motorway and a field with about 30 meters of trees and nettles that look to of been about 6 foot tall last year which to my limited knowledge indicates good soil.

I've dug over two beds and added loads of manure pelts and a coco coir a few 70 litre blocks.

The soil is clay however and can be rolled into a ball in my hands 😞 Will adding perlite 50 litres to each bed and more cococoir around 140 more litres.

Will this be enough to allow good drainage and good root development ?

Peace ganjagollum

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Is it heavy clay or just a bit sticky. soil is part clay so if you can dig it fine it will be fine.

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Is it heavy clay or just a bit sticky. soil is part clay so if you can dig it fine it will be fine.

Hi key4 thanks for responding,

You can dig it but its hard to break up and is quite sticky sticking to my fork and spade. Because it can be rolled into a ball which makes me worried it might have a very high clay content.

Thanks again

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Dig as much over as you can, let the frosts break it up. Go back early April and give it another going over. Add your pellets then too. Plant out Early May ( frosts depending ) Give each seedling a little extra compo on plant out . Jobs a good un. It will get better year on year. Add as much local mulch as you can, you'll have less to worry about during the dry spells.

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yeah! clay has loads of great nutrients, just most smaller plants find it hard to access them through the roots,...beacause its clay like texture. you wanna break it up with some nice silts: organic matter, sand, leaf mulch and stuff

you can use dolomite lime to help break down bigger lumps of clay. and it will help balance out any acidity in the clay also. but not too much as most strain prefer it a bit on the acidic pH side!

suck that clay dry of goodies! ha. good luck peoples

p

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There are several "clay breaker" products on the market (google is yr friend).

For more organic clay breakers google is still your friend just add the O word at the beginning of yr search.

Corky1998 suggestion is one of several good options and for maximum improvement should be used in conjunction with one or more of the other natural clay breaking additions for optimal effect in the original soil.

And as already pointed out, one of the ultimate clay breakers is Mother Nature, specifically in the form of frost and aeration.

Turn the soil in autumn (double dig preferably) make yr additions then lay weed control fabric to suppress growth till spring when u can turn once more and leave the fabric in place.

Plant out can be done with the matting in place still...

2p only not my area of expertise if I'm completely honest....

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Hi key4 thanks for responding,

You can dig it but its hard to break up and is quite sticky sticking to my fork and spade. Because it can be rolled into a ball which makes me worried it might have a very high clay content.

Thanks again

sounds fine just follow the advice above. I grew in solid grey clay last year and just added coco and local topsoil from the woods close by. It worked well untill this happend.

gallery_98736_13492_107695.jpg

Edited by Key4

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Hi guys,

I've already limed the two grow areas ( about 1.5 KG of westlands garden lime) and added about 70litres of coir to each. I am also going to add 50 litres of perlite to each and a few bags of compost hopeful this weekend if it doesn't freeze over (which it may). I will then leave the site for several months and assess if anymore organic material needs to be added.

I did debate using Gypsum but apparently it can alter your PH so I presumed that enough perlite and organic matter would do the job.

Thanks all again GanjaGollum :oldtoker:

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sounds fine just follow the advice above. I grew in solid grey clay last year and just added coco and local topsoil from the woods close by. It worked well untill this happend.

gallery_98736_13492_107695.jpg

What is that, is it from an animal burrowing under the cage??

I had that exact problem last year with animals, such rodents or rabbits, digging under the cages to get in. I lost several plant because of it. Or is that just where the soil has collapsed into itself?

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@@ganjagollum No need for perlite. coco does a better job.

Cheers pal,

Il head up there this weekend and do some more preping provided the weather holds! I've already bought the perlite now so il add it anyway but il make sure to make adding orangic matter my priority

Peace dude ✌️

Edited by ganjagollum

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@@Key4 i have cages installed beneath ground level. say 6-8" or so and the only pests i have had are the human kind. nothing below 3ft got touched last year.

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Hi guys,

I've already limed the two grow areas ( about 1.5 KG of westlands garden lime) and added about 70litres of coir to each. I am also going to add 50 litres of perlite to each and a few bags of compost hopeful this weekend if it doesn't freeze over (which it may). I will then leave the site for several months and assess if anymore organic material needs to be added.

I did debate using Gypsum but apparently it can alter your PH so I presumed that enough perlite and organic matter would do the job.

Thanks all again GanjaGollum :oldtoker:

Unless I'm mistaken (I don't think I am) a kilo n a half of lime is gonna make a much more drastic alteration to your ph than multiple kilos of gypsum.

Lime is strongly alkaline and will raise the ph of native soil.

Gypsum is neutral as I remember and will have little or no effect on soil ph.

2p

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