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namkha

Chitrali - Hindu Kush

123 posts in this topic

here's the same pink pistils on a Chitrali in Spain last month

will be great to see a shot of that one at night

Chitrali - pink pistils, outdoor Spain August

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surprised by how few people have picked up this strain yet, especially considering how rare it is in its native home, and how hard it is to get hold of

I suspect a lot of people wait until they see pretty photos, so I am hoping someone will have some this harvest season

will have to get a better camera for next time I go collecting

Possibly another reason to this is the perception of the Kush genetic as being all over the place and much less exotic and special as the Lebanese or any of the Himalayans or SE Asian strains youve been offering us. I could be wrong but I'm not sure many people realize it's as rare as you suggest in that quote. I know I didn't. Something to ponder. And obviously, beautiful pictures are always a plus. Edited by gandhara
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Possibly another reason to this is the perception of the Kush genetic as being all over the place and much less exotic and special as the Lebanese or any of the Himalayans or SE Asian strains youve been offering us. I could be wrong but I'm not sure many people realize it's as rare as you suggest in that quote. I know I didn't. Something to ponder. And obviously, beautiful pictures are always a plus.

So true, kush now seems to be a generic name for any strong smell,dark leaves,hard nugs mainstream hybrid. I'm not ven sure what people are talking about when saying kush,definitely not chitral nor kashmir.

Another point is that for the better informed grower there is already PCK a very popular strain which is a Chitral IBL with less diversity in it but more predictable outcome. And many growers interested in kush genetics probably already have their stach of seeds

Pretty interesting to see both... "same same but different".

My only Chitrali survivor this year is just starting to flower and shows pink pistils, looking forward to see how colorful it gets.

Edited by baduy

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Sadly I suspect you may be right about people mistakenly thinking it has no rarity value

which is ironic, as out of all of the strains I have collected it is undoubtedly the one that really has gone from being cultivated on a large scale to being grown by a scattering of farmers and smokers in the Yarkhun Valley

it is also one of the hardest to get (anyone else fancy going to Pakistan these days?)

@@baduy - modern day "Kush" could mean anything, and all modern hybrid strains are a totally different order of plant from a traditional open-pollinated heirloom strain ("landrace")

also - it's worth understanding that Chitral is part of the Hindu Kush Range, whereas Kashmir Valley is over in the Himalaya... the types of plant cultivated in the two regions reflect that (the whole Karakoram Range separates the two places)

Chitral belongs in the Hindu Kush genepool, along with plants cultivated in Afghanistan (two thirds of Afghanistan is the Hindu Kush... Chitral is right along the Afghan border, and is the highest region of the range)

from what I have gathered talking to Chitralis, their strain was introduced from Afghanistan in the '30s, when Yarkhun Valley became a major cultivating region after the Chinese nationalists shut down the Uighur cannabis trade in Western China (which is just to the east of Chitral)

here is a shot of a pink pistil pheno in Spain from this week:

Chitrali - pink pistils, outdoors in Spain

Edited by namkha
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I was told long time ago that Kashmiri strains were closer to their Hindu Kush neighboors than to Indian Himalayan ones. Probably a stoner myth

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Here are some better shots of my pink chitrali.

20160905 195025

20160908 193824

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i think most over 40 reconise a kush as from the kush mountains wide leaf stereotype indica hash type plants ,, ,, for todays generation its just a name for hybrids makes ya feel old lol

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but the chitrali are not wide leaf stereotypical stout afghan indica people expect

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but the chitrali are not wide leaf stereotypical stout afghan indica people expect

right, it was the same with mli when i went thru a few packs ,,many were the stereotype but a good degree were more what would be classed as hybrids or even pure sativas in appearance,, keeps it nice an interesting

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Love it when the landraces have narrow leaf and wide leaf phenos.

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pink pistil Chitrali (top) again


Chitrali outdoors Spain



Chitrali outdoors Spain


Edited by namkha
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Quick question for anyone who has experience with these Chitrali.

Its obvious that there is a large amount of phenotype variance in the plants but I'm curious whether the effects of the highs are noticeably more 'sativa' or 'indica' depending on the pheno?

Do the tall sativa leaning phenotypes have a noticeably more Sativa effect in the high or do these plants all tend towards their indica heritage regardless of their structural composition?

Thanks in advance for anyone who might have an answer to this question.

Edited by 222

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@@222

I haven't see any completed grow reports yet - but we should have some soon (the seeds were only collected in Oct 2015)

from smoking Chitrali charas at source, as with Afghani, my feeling is that it doesn't easily fall into the sativa/indica categories that Western smokers use

Chitrali has a very warm, centred and luminous effect

it will be interesting to see if the two basic types of plant do tend to either side of the spectrum in terms of effect - it is possible

Edited by namkha

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@@namkha

I'm definitely very curious about this. I understand that its very difficult to categorize or label many of these landrace charas strains under the traditional sativa/indica dichotomy since their Cannabinoid and terpene profile can vary so much from the modern day hybrid/dutch coffee house strains that have been selected relatively exclusively for THC production. Which is part of what makes landraces so exciting for me and I'm sure many others. I may just have to grab a pack of these to do some experimentation myself and see what I can find.

If I were to run a pack of 12 and get 4 or 5 each of males and females and did an open pollination of those plants could I expect to get a fairly wide representation within the genepool of those seeds to be considered a fair representation of their original source? Or would I need a larger parent population to fairly represent all the divergent paths this strain could take. I'm very interested because I see alot of breeding potential in these genetics but would rather reproduce a large population to work with to select down from later on rather than make selections early in breeding and try to broaden the genetics later when I'm trying to look for something different in the line. It should also be noted that I work indoors but I do have a few tools under my belt to help control these vigorous landraces.

Call it sacrilege but I'm also a little curious about mixing some of these genetics in with the CBG/ACE PCK just to see what kind of new expressions may show themselves and possibly add a little bit of vigour back into the PCK line. Obviously a separate project since I wouldn't want to taint these beautiful landrace plants genetic lines without preserving them first.

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Planting 12 individuals will sure result in some genetic bottleneck.keeping all the possible expressions of the plant would need more. Ïn fact PCK being a Chitral IBL mixing both would make sensé for the one who doesn't have enough beans. Me think your genetics wouldn't be more tainted than from cross polination with the meighbooring field in Chitral. The thing is it wouldn't mean that much diversity added as PCK is a heavily inbred line compared to RSC chitrali.

I lost all my chitrali but one because of wild boars so I plan on getting some others, I won't do it before harvest completed because of raising paranoïa level so if it's out of stock I will polinate a clone of my female with PCK.

Better than nothing.

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