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oldtimer1

Ot's new patch

161 posts in this topic

I'm jealous mate. I'm stuck in a house with tiny yard

I started out with a 4x5 m patio. I grabbed any container I cold, no mater the size, although recycling container are great for spuds, if you want to do it it`s amazing how you look at waste plastic containers in a different light, just cut drainage holes!

also. my sun was gone by 2pm, but I did ok. and sitting amongst it ll with a glass of beer and splif made life worth living

go for it mate :)

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I started out with a 4x5 m patio. I grabbed any container I cold, no mater the size, although recycling container are great for spuds, if you want to do it it`s amazing how you look at waste plastic containers in a different light, just cut drainage holes!

also. my sun was gone by 2pm, but I did ok. and sitting amongst it ll with a glass of beer and splif made life worth living

go for it mate :)

Best advice ever especially the bit i've highlighted with bold :yep:

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Stumbling over this thread reminds me that i need to stop loitering in the forums i am and venture out a bit ha ha.

Reading through the post just reminded me of time spent with my grandad. When i was a kid the grandfolks lived out in the middle of nowhere and were surrounded fruit and veg fields. He had the most awesome allotment and greenhouse at the bottom of the garden and i was always down there getting my knees dirty helping him out. Funnily enough he grew many of the local varieties (dont know how he acquired them ) but one of his prized things was his rhubarb and his giant tomatoes that he always said were his specials.. ooh and his radishes (urrgh) ! Sliced and sprinkled with seasalt in a salad of crisp leaves and buttery new potatoes all from the garden. Bloody lovely !

Not got much of a garden at the minute as only been here for near on 2 years and everything else has taken priority. Thankfully this year i have started on getting some order out there so i will be able to start planning a little plot next to my pond.

Already put some brackets up to hang some strawberry planters from so its a start .

Seed wise i have already a selection of tomatoes.. orange berry,san marzano,lldi,redpear,tigerella and costoluto fiorentino

I also have a few chillies to go.. habanero and african birdseye.

Im also hoping to get a few herb plants out this year aswell. Normally one of the first things i do when i move into a new place is get the standard rosemary and thyme planted out. A sunday roast just aint a sunday roast without these two accomplices. Only thing missing is the Garlic but i have never grown it before so this year maybe the first. Im also into thai food so iv got some thai basil coming , do any of you know if this grows and survives ok in uk climate ? Love the deep anniseed flavour to this and a must for a decent green curry.

Inspiring thread and a great read @@Ot1 and not only made me hungry but made me reminisce of a time, and a man long passed.

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Thought I would raise my not so new plot from obscurity.

 

Mainly to mention a new variety of sweetcorn I tried growing this year, called Amaize, things I really like about this variety is its the result of traditional breeding and absolutely now GMO genes in its makeup, I only recently found out that most of the newer supersets have some gmo in their makeup.

 

Its a white seeded corn and tastes just wonderful, I know its been a hot summer but I only watered these twice and even so they produced 2 or 3 almost perfect fully seeded cobs right to the tip, for sweetcorn lovers its worth looking out for, I think its outstanding.

 

large.Amaize.jpg.d933973f4e263c1b396d1f9

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Nice one @oldtimer1 :yep:

 

Im transitioning our back 3rd of garden this winter ready for next year the boy really wants to grow food and to be honest so do i...ive been saying it so long im pulling my finger out this year ! 

 

Its this GMO infused rubbish i dont want though ! are there places where one can go to purchase seeds for next years growing season thats come from non GMO produce and as close to/or is the same as yesteryear ?

 

Farmer 

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Lovely looking corn.  Someone told me each of the hairs needs pollination to produce a kernel.  So for a full cob of corn every single strand needs pollinating.  I'm sure you could enlighten me?

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@oldtimer1

 

Brill we have just got an allotment plot and wanted to grow some corn.

 

That looks just the ticket.

 

peace !

 

lil d.

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@FARMER GHope you don't mind me jumping in, you could do worse than try...

http://www.realseeds.co.uk/

They do a lot of heirloom and traditional varieties, lots of useful information on the site too.

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Awesome veg mate, I like this guys approach

 

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Pepper Magnum a F1 is a habanero-type, at 200-300,000 Scoville units, well hot enough for me very prolific in the G/H boarder.

large.magnum.jpg.8628cf6eed6633e98e1cd31

 

This is a Pepper Midas a mild sweet pepper x chilli, pretty disappointed its bland and boring IMHO. I have been looking for mexibell an American pepper chilly hybrid I used to grow, Midas is not a comparison, late this season I found a uk supplier of mexibel seeds here! I will be growing these next year.

large.midas.jpg.377e413806c2a778814be836

 

@FARMER G I would not bother with old varieties of sweetcorn for a number of reasons, mostly they are much harder to grow and only hold as sweet for a very short time before going starchy. Better a modern variety like Amaize, ok its an  F1, but trad breeding methods were used and no transgenic slices, it crops well in the UK and holds its sweet crisp seeds without going starchy for several weeks.

 

Farmer the other bane of the home grower is late blight, old tasty tomato varieties like my own selection of gardeners delight just go down with blight the minute there is a spore or two in the air, I always put one plant of gardeners delight in the outdoor garden to indicate that blight is present and compost the plant immediately it showed up  here and that was weeks back, you really don't want to be propagating blight spores in your garden. 

 

I grow quite a lot of tomatoes to juice down and make passata, over the last two years I tried all of the Crimson series sold by Suttons and they all went down with blight as soon as it was in the area, on top of that there so called good flavoured Crimson crush, is not tasty at all its pretty much tasteless pap raw or as cooked pulp, so don’t be taken in by the blurb.

 

This year I’m growing Mountain Magic, its good enough for eating raw but tastes better cooked.not a single blighted leaf so far, its a very heave cropper, if you want a disease resistant tomatoes that will continue into the autumn, then a couple of these will give you a good supply for  two or three months, added to that again its traditionally bred and took many years to produce. The cheapest supplier is the same as for Mexibell.

large.moutain.jpg.fadc1919a569411d5fec82

 

A final few words, to me the more naturally you can grow your own food the better so I have for years tried to grow as organically as possible, I try where I can to save my own seeds, I believe they adapt to your local, so prefer OP varieties so people like real seeds are brilliant for some varieties, but in some cases modern breeding for disease resistance is the way forwards for me, I'm not flat earth. You only have to look in a garden centre to see shelves of insecticides/fungicides and weedkillers to see its a massive market, I try and avoid most or use old/new organic methods. I also really like charles dowding's methods and have learnt learnt a lot from his books and site ie the link above by @Dr feelgood if you are converting a bit of lawn, maybe a quick way would be making  raised beds like @polo71 topic. He's made a really good start!

 

Hope this is of some help in pointing you for ways to look.

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Thank you very much @oldtimer1 i really appreciate the reply :yinyang:

 

Ive never grown food before...its a shame because if i put as much effort into actual food growing as i do cannabis i should be okay ! 

 

Thanks again my friend i will be digesting a whole new chapter in my life this coming week as i have plenty of reading planned so i start getting the picture and hopefully starts me off on my journey of growing my own food.

 

Farmer

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