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Comrade Stoker

Fermented Food Recipes and Techniques

333 posts in this topic

Have you looked into the use of silver cutlery?? We use silver spoons in yoghurt (we get the large tubs of Greek stuff from Lidl), seems to keep for longer.

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Have you looked into the use of silver cutlery?? We use silver spoons in yoghurt (we get the large tubs of Greek stuff from Lidl), seems to keep for longer.

Hi Mendel

I bought myself a silver teaspoon and I like using it. I would have thought that any metal in yogurt would kill off bacteria though? Am I missing something?

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Erm, :g:

wouldn't have thought so as it's a solid spoon, my understanding was that bacteria and fungi cannot live on a silver spoon and therefore you are not transferring or introducing any new/alien bacteria and fungi into the already fermented culture. I imagine if i added colloidal silver then it would kill everything but that's because the particle size is teenie weenie.

Just had a google of silver in medicine and cookery and found this interesting page

http://www.atomicsilver.info/history.php

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I use wooden spoons and forks if I want to dig around in any of my ferments. I just use metal spoons when I eat yoghurt. A big wooden fork is ideal for pulling kraut out of a Kilner jar.

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Is this big enough?

spoon2_large.jpg

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Is this big enough?

They're big enough if you're Jeanette Kranky, you big wuss!

On the Beet Kvass 2nd run, I forgot to add salt and its gone mouldy.

The fermented chilli sauce has had me in pieces tonight (Running up and down the stairs, holding water in my mouth trying to cool it down etc.). Its very nice.

The water kefir is lovely, its the best batch I have done. First time round I did not use enough sugar, second time not enough kefir. This one is lovely.

I have just done another kefir using a cup and a half of unrefined sugar, a golf ball blob of molasses and 1 litre of red grape juice (From concentrate - The shitty stuff in the cartons).

I bottled up the previous kefir and put about 20 raisins into the bottom of each bottle to do the second ferment and add a new flavour. I am loving this fermenting lark.

Edited by Comrade Stoker
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My saeurkraut is starting to ferment I think, there are bubbles on the surface of the liquid, either that or I have a jar of rotting cabbage in my kitchen.

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Bubbles means its looking good. How long has it been going?

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3 days.

I've got a few Sweet Aji peppers (Dedo de Mocha), last of this years crop, I was thinking of trying to either pickle or ferment them. What's in your fermented chilli sauce Mr Stoker?

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Fermented sauce was something along the following lines:

Chillies - Take the stalks off (Use them to start a yoghurt). Leave the green pentagon thing in the chilli

Sauerkraut or whey starter (Just a large pot of yoghurts worth)

5 garlic cloves

Sea salt

I followed the below recipe, though I played around a bit with quantities and I have not sieved it.

INGREDIENTS
  • 3 pounds fresh chili peppers (Scotch bonnets, Jalapenos, Serranos etc.)
  • 4 to 6 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 2 tablespoons unrefined cane sugar, optional
  • 2 teaspoons unrefined sea salt
  • vegetable starter culture dissolved in 1/4 cup water, or 1/4 cup fresh whey
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Snip the stems from the chilies, but leave their green tops intact.
  2. Combine all all ingredients in a food processor, or mince by hand, until chopped to a fine pasty texture.
  3. Spoon the chili paste into a glass mason jar and allow it to fermented, covered, at room temperature for five to seven days.
  4. After the chili paste has bubbled and brewed for about a week, set a fine-mesh sieve over a mixing bowl and spoon the fermented chili paste into the sieve. With a wooden spoon, press the chili paste into the sides of the sieve so that the sauce drips from the sieve into the waiting mixing bowl.
  5. Once you’ve pressed and pushed the chili sauce through the sieve, pour the sauce from the bowl into jar or bottle and store in the refrigerator. The sauce will keep for several months.
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Had a duck leg with sauerkraut tonight and the words lake palmer floated in front of my eyes. Delicious combo. :yep:

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@@Comrade Stoker have you tried making the chilli stem yoghurt? i thought you put a guide up but i cant find it. im going to give it a try this weekend.

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I didn't make it as my missus threw the stalks out (Because "They were just stalks"). I did post the recipe, let me dig it out again.

From another site http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/863207

I've been wanting to try this for some time. Using a commercial yogurt as a starter is fine but the subsequent generations are much weaker than the original. Ditto for the powdered probiotics. I rarely get more than a generation or two from either.

There's very little on the 'net about your own starter (as compared to creating your own sourdough starter). I came across 2 options: the chili pepper stems and ant eggs. I figured the ant eggs would be difficult to differentiate from dirt, so pepper stems it was.

I did the usual heat milk to 180 and cool to the incubation range. Then I added the stems and incubated for 24 hours.

The results was a very firm yogurt that didn't pour. Usually when the yogurt is still warm, it will pour.

I'm refrigerating it now and will taste it once it's cold. It smells fine and looks good.

If the rather meagre postings I have read about this are true, this should produce a mother starter.

Pics here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/marypatc...

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I have mold on the surface of my sauerkraut fluid, is it fucked?

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