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catfish

pyramids

194 posts in this topic

Loads of interesting stuff about them.

I do like a good mystery. They started off advanced and declined over time from something i read somewhere a while ago lol

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That Brian bloke doesn't really have a clue when it comes to tooling marks. Loads of good stuff from him otherwise

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Not only can nobody explain how they cut those boxes but they can't explain how the builders got them down there: some archaeologist tried removing one and gave up trying after a few feet, it's still partially blocking a passageway.

1:10 000th of an inch. Copper chisels? Somehow I don't think so.

Interesting that there's another 22 boxes down there in a closed off section, there's shitloads of stuff that's still locked away and much of the surrounding area too.Somebody must have gone down those gated passages but their findings have never been released. I can't think of any other archaeological site where such secrecy is maintained, and I'm not going to start blathering about aliens etc. but whatever is down there has got to be something awesome.

They're doing a good job of keeping it secret too, you never see anything about campaigns to let people down there nor anyone claiming to have sneaked a peek.

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this one is good too..

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typical response from someone involved with academia at the highest levels deny what other people find .

attack people who dont share you view .

take the credit for other peoples work .

quote other people ,whilst doing no field work yourself .

whilst getting a huge salary, pension ,tv and book deals .

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@@iBMe nice one dude thats my afternoon sorted! Interested in this pyramid explosion thing too never heard of that

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The Egyptian pyramids are considered one of the Seven Wonders of the World, and it’s not surprising: when you stare at the massive structures, you can’t help but wonder, “How the hell did they do it?” The stones, some weighing 9,000 pounds, came from far away and needed to be dragged into place. Now, researchers from the University of Amsterdam believe they’ve discovered ancient Egyptians’ cunning strategy to move those massive stones: wet sand.

With the right amount of water, researchers found, sand turns into a sturdy surface that halves the force needed to drag sleds loaded with rocks or statues across the desert. In fact, an ancient wall painting in the tomb of Djehutihotep shows a person pouring water over the sand in front of a sledge.

Sliding Sleds
sled.png

Sand builds up in front of the sledge when it is dragged over dry sand. On the wet, compact sand this does not occur. (Credit: Fundamental Research on Matter)

To test their hypothesis, researchers loaded up sledges with heavy weights and, well, dragged them across sand. When they dragged the weighted sled across dry sand, the front of the sled dug into the sand and nosedived deeper into trouble. When the sand was wet, however, the sand stiffened and allowed the sled to slide across with ease. At a molecular level, that’s because so-called capillary bridges arise when water is added to sand, which binds the sand grains together.

Researchers then used a rheometer to measure how much force is needed to deform a certain volume of sand. They found that wet sand is about twice as stiff as dry sand, which, in turn, halves the amount of force needed to move a weight. They published their findings Tuesday in the journal Physical Review Letters.

The simple wetting of sand, then, may have made building the pyramids easier—though the 100,000 slaves (according to Greek historian Herodotus) who labored constantly to build the massive structures may debate that definition of easy.

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2014/05/01/secret-building-pyramids-wet-sand/#.U2QBNfldUjC

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Not easy to get the alignment so perfect and why was it so important to do so ?

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