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namkha

Traditional Veg' Strains Outperform Modern Hybrids

A field trial of lettuces has found that older, more traditional varieties outperform their modern-day counterparts, standing up better to bad weather and showing stronger resistance to downy mildew.

Eleven of the 12 best-performing varieties of lettuce at the Garden Organic trial were 'heritage' types - traditional, unimproved forms, many of which have fallen out of wider circulation as modern hybrids have come to dominate the market. Many of the older lettuce varieties trialled were taken from Garden Organic's Heritage Seed Library, which conserves the seed of old vegetable varieties to prevent them being lost altogether.

A Cos variety dating back to the 1930s called 'George Richardson' was only outperformed by one commercial variety, 'Kitare'. Other older lettuce varieties which outdid modern hybrids included Victorian-bred winter lettuce 'Rouge d'Hiver' and 'Bronze Arrow', a loose-leaf variety from California dating back to the 1940s.

“It wasn't what I expected,” said Phil Sumption, who led the research. “When you grow commercially you tend to always go for the latest new varieties.”

Garden Organic is now discussing further trials with seed companies and growers with the eventual aim of bringing some of the older varieties back into commercial production.

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Heya , really not that surprising , i dont no how the test were conducted but i would wager they were grow in controlled organic fertile soil , i would like to see a test with them stacked up in the dead soil conditions in the field , chicken - egg / soil - seed .

Do you have a further source for theat than the Rhs namkha ?

We are growing some traditional varieties of dianthus the crosses do not compare in vigor or smell .

“It wasn't what I expected,” said Phil Sumption, who led the research.
great :doh:

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What seed companies list and sell the oldies? Because i don`t know enough about seed other than sticking them in soil apart from the odd name,Gardener`s Delight and Bunyards Exibition! Wether they are old i don`t know.

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heirloom vigour is where it's at

cf. the Lebanese yield thread

imagine a hybrid made of pure heirlooms like that

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I think this is related to this topic and I thought you might find it interesting.

4/1/2011 - A new United Nations (UN) report blows a major hole in the modern myth that genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) are the answer to improving crop yields and ending world hunger. A UN Special Rapporteur explains that small-scale eco-farming reliant on natural growing methods works better than GMO. http://www.naturalnews.com/031917_eco-farming_crop_yields.html

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I consider RSC seeds to be "heirloom" varieties and one of the main reasons I grow them is because they have proper vigour and disease resistance like the strains I grew back in the eighties. I can honestly say that the most vigorous and disease resistant strains I currently own are all RSC landrace.

I have found all the modern cultivars (usually of Dutch origin) to have undesirable fixed traits such as zero mould resistance. They also tend to exhibit inbreeding loss of vigour resulting in weak slow growing plants outdoors. Part of this is due to deliberate selection and possibly some genetic evolution for growing under lights.

In a recent comparison I grew a very expensive cutting edge Dutch strain (which I will not name) against a RSC Highland Lao. The Dutch strain was supposedly 75% Sativa and theoretically should have done the best in my latitude competing against a pure tropical sativa. Instead it grew at one third the rate, reached half the size with spindly growth and died of various fungal attacks that overwhelmed it. The RSC Lao had no problems at all and cost one quarter the price.

A few years back I grew RSC Pahari Farmhouse outdoors and it was one of the fastest, tallest and most vigorous strains that I have seen in a long time.

cannabisnz

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Not surprising at all . Actually , the seed co's know this .

Most of the veg varieties are bred for yield and a light taste . We can't have kids spitting out the old brussell sprouts !

The winter corn/barley that grew years back never needed to be treated for fungus but the varieties now are better yielders .They take more looking after though .

Some do sell the old varieties . If you can get plain 'garden pea' , you'll be eating the peas your grandparents ate .

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Funnily enough the best source for heirloom seed, thats veg seed by the way, is from the real seed catalogue. They're all about non hybridized seed, are you guys the same company :)

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One major thing about modern hybrids grown indoors is that there are not enough plants to select from due to space restriction, its essentially all pollen chucking, and hybrid vigour masks any bad genes... only true landrace growers have the space and the plant numbers to properly select and keep their variety healthy and free from inbreeding decline.

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Another instance highlighting our shortcomings from meddling with nature, as if we are that superior in intellect that we could somehow modify and improve on billions of years worth of evolution. :ouch:

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Funnily enough the best source for heirloom seed, thats veg seed by the way, is from the real seed catalogue. They're all about non hybridized seed, are you guys the same company :)

I accidentally semi-stole their name - it sounds like a weak excuse for just wanting to use the name, but honestly what happened was I'd agreed on the name with a friend when we were trekking, I got back to London at a friend's house (I'd come via Pakistan and picked up a severe gastric fever, probably typhoid, and there had been bombs and gunfights and shit in Peshawar and Islamabad, and a lot of charas) and I just went online, searched the Companies House database, saw nobody had the name, and registered the URL

fuck knows how, but apparently during none of that process did it occur to me to google the name - if I had seen they already had a very close name, I'm not sure if I would have used it or not

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That's because heirlooms/nature rock!

Commercial strains are bred for 3 primary traits: Yield/Pest Resistance & Water Retention (this isn't even counting frankenshite GMO's which include pesticide resistance in their bastardised DNA, which nature overcomes; requiring ever increasing amounts of pesticides to keep at bay), increased yield/resistance is a sales scam by bio-corps which most of the world is waking up to, so they now send most of their seeds to third world countries to bankrupt poor farmers and steal their land/resources, having the additional effect of poisoning the people there. It's sick!

Now consider these three traits have been reinforced, generation over generation at the sacrifice of taste/nutrition and equilibrium to the point humans think the only Tomato that exists in the world is the fucking salad tomato, it's ridiculous.

There are a ton of studies showing heirlooms produce holds more nutrition than commercially grown shite, resists pests better (given a few seasons to find their equilibrium), they taste better and they hold WAY more nutrition and no poison!

I hold the belief that any organism naturally knows what is good for it based on first contact.

We have two kids, their first taste of tomatoes was the mass produced salad tomato from a supermarket (before I knew!), they touched it once, and would never touch them again. Later, we grew heirloom tomatoes and gave them to the kids and they sat there with smiles on their faces and ate as much as they could, they loved them!

See kids haven't been polluted by the media that tells them what's nice to eat/healthy/approved/etc. they let their body tell them what they need to know; the body is an amazing system, it will provide feedback on the quality of nutrition, it needs to be listened too!

Nature knows best. Don't fuck with it and it won't fuck with you!

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Heirlooms kick modern hybrid ass! For example, my cannabis hybrids get Powdery Mildew way easier than the RSC strains, and other landraces I have collected.

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Hey

This year I got heavy infestation of planthoppers and now caterpillars. They make a feast of skunky hybrids and don't touch my Himalayan and kush strains.

Obviously pest and mold resistance are most important for traditionnal farmers and are traits that were a bit left aside by indoor breeders chasing primarly for high THC levels,fast flowering and big yeld.

The importance of such genetics goes without saying,when the prohibition era will be over and outdoor growing become the norm a bit of selection for earliness a few generations could make them fantastic outdoor plants for northern climates.

I'm impressed by kumaoni which seems to be the most versatile plant I've ever seen. Pest resistance, big seeds for oil, strong stems which are great for fiber,and, according to Namkha, "a blissful high". Maybe the ultimate ganja plant for pre(post?)industrial farming.

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