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namkha

Why You Should Save Your Own Seed

34 posts in this topic

if ya make ya own seeds are you better off pollinating a selected female with a few males or a selected male ? :headpain:

hi NMW

with RSC strains - heirlooms, landraces, whatever you want to call them

you must open pollinate

use all your males to pollinate the females

then select the best performing females for next year, and reject any under-performing females (disease, poor vigour, poor potency)

this is so important

it's terrible to receive e-mails from old customers saying "why is the Mazar not on sale now, I need more!"

to which I want to reply "why the hell didn't you make your own Mazar seed, you fool!"

when you buy pure heirloom seed and pure IBL seed - always always make more seeds --- it should be the first thing you do!

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Took the kids to Beatrix Potter world in the lakes couple of weeks ago and they have a small garden based on the Peter Rabbit stories that's filled with the different vars of vegetables that appear in the stories.

Almost all of them are not widely grown or available anymore, and there were loads... So sad really, bloody supermarkets have so much to answer for.

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yeh I was trying to persuade a friend of mine to try the super early sweet Siberian yellow vine tomato variety they have

http://www.realseeds.co.uk/tomatoes_vines.html

he got all shitty saying it was pretentious hippy garbage growing "heirloom" veg

how I laughed when his F1s from the garden centre all failed

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I totally agree with breeding plants for future safeguarding of seeds.

I do like buying seeds too. Making your own seeds is something that makes

you a better all around grower in my opinion.

Here are some of my reasons for making my own seeds and saving them.

1. You never know when a breeder will stop making or selling the breed or strain that you enjoy.

How many time as a plant gone off the market? So buy,breed and save them before they are gone.

2. Making you own seeds allows you to have fun creating possibly something unlike anyone else.

No two persons breed the same. So yours are always going to be original one way or another.

3. I even save vegetable seeds too. I have kept heirloom tomato seeds from one of my uncles.

If I hadn't they would certainly disapear since I'm almost the last green thumb in my family.

So do save any seed that you enjoy.

4. I find it a power trip to hold more seeds than you can ever plant at one time.

It's all about security and safety. Do not keep all your seeds in one place if

you truly want security.

Edited by corky1968
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Corky1968

great to see you back man

give us another one of your awesome grow threads!

all best

Namkha

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Good thread,

Real seed catalogue Sutherland kale-heirloom veg and hopefully delicious,

post-62086-0-29456500-1309900665_thumb.jpg

Do people do grow diaries for veg? :)

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hey - if it's heirloom veg you can put a veg grow diary in these forums... I started a medicinal plants thread (though it's gone nowhere so far) as well... if it's medicinal or psychoactive or heirloom conserving it's welcome here

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Cary Fowler’s Seed Crusade Goes to the Movies By John Seabrook

May 21, 2015

Seabrook-Seeds-of-Time-690.jpg

Fowler seeks to answer the question of how crops will adapt to what he calls “the climates and environments of tomorrow.” Credit Photograph Courtesy Ian Savage

“Seeds of Time,” a documentary film about the agriculturalist Cary Fowler and his efforts to create an apocalypse-proof global seed bank on the Norwegian island of Svalbard, opens on Friday in New York. (I wrote about Fowler for the magazine in 2007 and will be chatting with the filmmaker, Sandy McLeod, on Saturday night at Cinema Village.) The film, through Fowler, seeks to answer the question of how crops will adapt to what he calls “the climates and environments of tomorrow.” These climates, he told me recently, “haven’t existed since beyond the beginnings of agriculture,” and their advent coincides with a number of other challenges: more mouths to feed, limitations on water and land, new pests and diseases.

Because agricultural crops are the result not of natural but of human selection, their evolution is in our hands—the hands of farmers and plant breeders. For the great monocultures (corn, soy, wheat), this isn’t a problem. “We have a lot of plant breeders for our top three or four crops,” Fowler said. “But once you go down the list, you see that many of our crops have very few breeders, and some crops, which are locally or regionally important, have no breeders whatsoever. And so the question arises: Do subsistence farmers, who select their seeds from year to year, have enough diversity in their fields today to fashion the varieties they will need for tomorrow?”

Fowler is convinced that they do not. Yams, for example, are a staple in many parts of Africa. Farmers there grow some forty-two million tons of the vegetable every year—enough to fill every boxcar in North America. And yet, Fowler told me, there are only six plant breeders in the world who work on yams. “You can say how many millions of people depend on yams, but the reverse is also important: How many people do yams depend on?” he said. “How can six individual yam breeders, even working at breakneck speed, ever hope to deal with the onset of climate change in growing regions as diverse as those in Africa?”

So what are we to do? Fowler is working to persuade one or more large corporations to use their global distribution networks for seeds, sending packets to millions of farmers around the world. (He declined to name names but said, “I wouldn’t mind taping a packet of seeds to Coca-Cola bottles and sending them to the farthest reaches of the world—I mean, they’re everywhere.”) The contents of the packets would be drawn from existing seed banks and would be selected for favorable characteristics, depending on a given area’s predicted conditions under the regime of climate change. “It wouldn’t have to be that many seeds,” Fowler said. “The packets would contain a combination of land races”—traditional domesticated varieties—“and improved varieties, enough to plant a row or two, not a whole field, just for experimental purposes.”

Fowler is quick to point out that there is a historical precedent for an enterprise like this. Not a single one of the major agricultural crops grown in this country is native to it. Potatoes, tomatoes, corn, wheat, apples, avocados, peas, and beans—they’re all immigrants. “In our history, the real challenge in establishing agriculture was not just importing the crop but importing the diversity of the crop, which would enable adaptation in the different regions,” Fowler said. The United States imported diversity in huge quantities. “We had the U.S. Navy involved, we had consulates involved, we were buying seeds from companies in Europe, and we established agreements with two dozen countries for reciprocal exchanges of germplasm. And we multiplied that diversity and sent it out, principally through the postal system, mailing boxes of seeds to farmers.” At the system’s height, he said, there were more than twenty million boxes of seeds in transit each year. “It was just an incredible agricultural experiment.” His hope is to organize a similar experiment today. It’s a crazy idea, but Fowler is no stranger to those.

http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/cary-fowlers-seed-crusade-goes-to-the-movies?intcid=mod-latest

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Fascinating topic.

I landed here after buying a pack of Mazar-I-Sharif and a pack of Chitrali which I was intending to grow outdoors during 2016.

Not any more after reading this. I wasn't aware folk did this open pollination but I'm going to give it a go after I move home, probably end-2016 so it will be for 2017 to get myself a seed stash for 2018. I'm at Lat 37N so they ought to do well in the climate here.

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I'm at Lat 37N so they ought to do well in the climate here.

nice, outdoors at 37N, good to hear!

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nice, outdoors at 37N, good to hear!

Hi namkha,

Rest assured I'll stick up a diary when I start these. I also decided I'm going to try Sinai, Malana Cream & Nanda Devi so they have been ordered.

I'll give you the nod on this thread once I'm up and running.

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looking forward to it!

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I bought tomatoes and peppers from these guys and they are a great company to deal with. They actively encourage you to save your seed and let them know how their stuff grows in your garden/allotment

I'm doing the galina this year! Will let you know how they get on!

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what company are you talking about? The the other "real seed company"? lol they do have some cool shit.

I collect seeds of all sorts too. I have a fridge full of veggie seeds (try to keep heirloom), exotic flowers and of course ganja seeds in excessive amounts that I could never go through in a lifetime.

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with RSC strains - heirlooms, landraces, whatever you want to call them

you must open pollinate

use all your males to pollinate the females

when you buy pure heirloom seed and pure IBL seed - always always make more seeds --- it should be the first thing you do!

dear namkha,

to avoid bottlenecks, how many males and females you recommend for this?

thank you very much

Edited by oneturtle

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