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Snake

The Chilli Thread

864 posts in this topic
On 18/07/2018 at 10:34 PM, Biokid said:

Just cropped 30 long green pods of  fire from my 3 year old cayenne. She is grown from seeds out of the one that lasted 5 years on the kitchen windowsill.

 

Time for a proper curry :)

 

Bio

Wee update - I topped the plant a few weeks back because it was higher than the window and it appeared to have stoped flowering for the season but a couple of weeks back one or two flowers appeared. Last night I counted 20 or so flowers and several are developing chillies after I pollinated them.

Second flush here we come.

 

Bio

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i managed to get 12 chillies from my cayenne  and 6 scotch bonnets ... also had just 4  from the dragons breath .....  i dried the lot and blended them ...  they dident smell that strong ............so i  had a pinch of them rew to test the taste  ........................... ....BIG mistake ........  :furious:

Edited by vortex
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Aji Omnicolour - A large, vigorous, fast growing plant during veg, but they seem to take bloody ages for the chillies to ripen! Pods literally take about 3 months between their initial formation and them actually turning red, compared to say the Serrano, which goes from flower to red chillies in about 3-4 weeks. I wasn't picking the first red chillies on this Omnicolour until early September, which is quite late for a non-Habanero type. The plants are however large and colourful with lots of fruit. Overall score - 7/10

 

large.tobasco_1.jpg

large.img_9248.jpg

 

 

Apache F1 - probably the most reliable outdoor chilli plant from my experience, with it producing copious amounts of chillies, well into November in previous years. It stands up well to the cold and wet, producing abundant pods that carry a considerable kick of heat. I would grow this every year just for it's reliability. A solid chilli. Plants in the ground grow waaaaay bigger than ones in pots, as evidenced in my pics. Overall score - 8/10

 

large.apache_1.jpg

large.apache_2.jpg

large.apache_3.jpg

large.img_9241.jpg

 

 

Basket of Fire - like the Apache, this is a very easy pepper plant to grow, particularly in a cool, temperate climate. Although the unripe chillies start off a rather dull green/grey colour (which they remain for some time) they will eventually turn to yellow before taking on purple hues and turning orange, before finally red. They certainly exhibit a spectrum of colours come August, which is highly ornamental. These pods also carry a considerable kick, hence the name. Can't fault it. 8/10.

 

large.basket_of_fire_1.jpg

large.img_9239.jpg

 

 

Bhut Jolokia White - I found this highly ornamental come late August/early September, with nice tear drop shaped pods, that turn from green, to yellow, to white. It is very hot as well, in the 1,000,000 SHU range. So go easy. It's not the earliest to mature, so be sure to start this one nice and early, by February at the latest I would say, to ensure you are harvesting by September. I can't really fault this one, except it is a little bit on the late side to mature, as is the case with all habaneros. But nonetheless, a good pepper plant. I would grow again. 7/10

 

large.img_9233.jpg

large.img_9250.jpg

 

 

Bolivian Rainbow - by far the smallest chilli plant that I have ever grown. It is not overly productive, but the pods carry a considerable amount of heat. It is also supposed to be one of the most ornamental and colourful varieties in existence, but I did not see that spectrum of colours. I was somewhat disappointed by the lack of a colour show. Peppers seemed to go from green, to yellow, to red, with very little, if any purple, as they are depicted in images. I'm not sure whether I will grow this variety again. The Basket of Fire was more colourful. Overall score - 5/10

 

large.bolivian_rainbow_1.jpg

large.bolivian_rainbow_2.jpg

 

 

Carolina Reaper - The only pepper in my collection that I have not yet harvested any chillies from. I'm still about 3 weeks away from taking the first pods from this one. Very, very slow out of the blocks, in terms of germination, slow early growth and although it picked up come July and grew much, much quicker, it was still very slow at setting fruit. You need a lot of patience with this one. I recommend starting these as early as possible, like in January, if you want to harvest by late August/early September. Slow growth all around. But you've got to grow this one once, just to say you've done it. Overall score - still pending.

 

large.carolina_reaper.jpg

 

 

Chocolate Habanero - I had 2 of these and both were a right pain in the arse to grow during the early stages, with them barely growing during the cooler spring weather and looking somewhat unhealthy. But come June, they started taking off and have grown to quite big proportions since then, although like other Habanero types, it is always going to be quite late to set fruit, and to ripen, so best to start these as early as possible. First pods were harvested in early September and it is definitely one of the better tasting habaneros. 7/10. 

 

large.img_9227.jpg

large.img_9226.jpg

large.img_9234.jpg

 

 

Douglah - plants grow big, with large side branches and big brown pods. I can't really fault the growth, but like most Habanero types, it can take a while to set fruit and to finally ripen, so start seeds early! I picked my first ones in late August. There isn't much smell to these peppers at first glance, but fuck me, these pods are hot! Just one pod is enough to make a rather spicy dish for 3-4 people. And it still had me reaching for the milk! This has to be on par with the Carolina Reaper for spiciness, in my opinion. It'll melt your fucking face off! 8/10.

 

large.douglah_1.jpg

large.douglah_2.jpg

large.5b8eadd6b0680_Douglahpods.jpg

 

 

Jalapeno Early - very quick growing and vigorous, and consequently very early to fruit, with the first peppers ready by late June. This was the second earliest plant to be picked and it is highly productive with 4 of these plants producing well over 150 peppers between them so far. It does excellent in the UK climate and is hard to fault, but one issue is that it can be prone to snapping, with all 4 plants experiencing breaks to some degree, due to high winds, the weight of the chillies, or them getting knocked. Nonetheless, it should be on every UK grower's list still! 9/10. 

 

large.jalapeno_early.jpg

large.img_9243.jpg

 

 

Naga Bhutlah (chocolate) - Holy shit! This is one HOT pepper and easily comparable in terms of heat with the Reaper & Douglah. I cut one in half and took the plunge, and besides bringing me to tears, I also physically felt sick from it. Just overwhelmingly hot! It must be at least 2,000,000SHU. Appearance and growth rates were almost identical to the Douglah, but the taste is distinctively different. It's definitely another novelty pepper. As with all Habanero types, start seeds early in winter. Grow it if you dare. You've been warned. 7/10.

 

large.img_9229.jpg

large.img_9230.jpg

 

 

Padron - fast growing and highly productively, it was also the earliest pepper variety to set fruit and harvest, with peppers being picked as early as mid June! The biggest plant alone has produced around 100 peppers this year! They are best picked early, and fried in olive oil to make Pimientos de Padron, a popular Basque dish. If the peppers are left on the branch, they can grow to gigantic proportions as shown below, and pack far, far more heat! And once they turn red, they are hot as hell! Probably the best pepper to grow in the UK as it stands up very well to our climate. 9/10.

 

large.padron_1.jpg

large.padron_2.jpg

large.padron_3.jpg

 

 

Purple Tiger - This ornamental plant has lovely purple flowers and is very similar looking to the Zimbabwe Black variety, but the chillies on this are bigger and fuller. The pods also retain their purple/black colour much more, with pods remaining dark coloured for many, many weeks before eventually turning red. The taste is somewhat sour when picked too early, so best left on for as long as possible, or taken when red. The purplish/black pods are relatively mild and taste of grape in my opinion. 7/10

 

large.purple_tiger_1.jpg

large.purple_tiger_2.jpg

large.img_9246.jpg

 

 

Serrano - One of my favourite chillies this year, with pods that ripen very, very quickly once they start being produced (red within 3-4 weeks). The first fully ripened chillies came down in late July, with a considerable kick in the heat department. These also do very well in the UK climate and stand up well to cool nighttime temps. This should be on every UK chilli grower's list. I will probably overwinter the plant in the picture below. 9/10

 

large.serrano_1.jpg

large.serrano_2.jpg

large.serrano_3.jpg

 

 

Tabasco - This thing is slower than a stoned snail moving through super glue. Fucking hell. I won't be cropping any peppers off this until October, given how slow it is to grow, and how long it takes to set fruit, which is beyond ridiculous when growing in the UK climate. And it was started from seed fairly early, in February! I doubt I will bother growing Tabasco gain. In what has been a very good season for peppers, this is one of only 2 chilli varieties that have not performed. I'll probably end up bringing this inside to finish. Overall rating - 4/10.

 

large.img_9244.jpg

large.img_9245.jpg

 

 

Trinidad Perfume - Easily my favourite pepper this year! The ornamental, yellow/orange pods have a unique, fruity taste with only a minor hint of spice. You can eat these peppers by the truckload. And they taste so bloody good! The first pods weren't ready until mid August, so try and start this early, by January or February, for earlier harvests and bigger yields. Definitely one to overwinter and grow each year, just for it's uniqueness! Once you try it, you will grow it year on year. 10/10.  

 

large.t_perfume_1.jpg

large.t_perfume_2.jpg

 

 

Zimbabwe Black - a nice ornamental chilli with purple tinted foliage. One positive I found, was this plant to be relatively early to mature, with the first red chillies appearing as soon as early July. But my one gripe is that the pods are very, very small. The smallest pods this year by a country mile. I might cross this with a bigger podded purple variety that I can grow out next year. 7/10

 

large.zimbabwe_black_1.jpg

large.zimbabwe_black_2.jpg

 

 

This morning's pepper haul...

 

large.img_9251.jpg

large.img_9252.jpg

 

:yinyang:

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my second scotch bonnet is covered in flowers ,  but no pods ...  any ideas  how late they can keep going  into winter please ?

Edited by vortex
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I’ve got some Kashmiri chilli seeds, having trouble germinating them though. Really want this variety for my Indian dishes. I’m pretty good at authentic Indian food so thought some fresh Kashmiris would be great as it’s the only ingredient I can’t get fresh. Any pointers guys?

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On 04/09/2018 at 5:21 PM, The Sheriff of Nottingham said:

Aji Omnicolour - A large, vigorous, fast growing plant during veg, but they seem to take bloody ages for the chillies to ripen! Pods literally take about 3 months between their initial formation and them actually turning red, compared to say the Serrano, which goes from flower to red chillies in about 3-4 weeks. I wasn't picking the first red chillies on this Omnicolour until early September, which is quite late for a non-Habanero type. The plants are however large and colourful with lots of fruit. Overall score - 7/10

 

large.tobasco_1.jpg

large.img_9248.jpg

 

 

Apache F1 - probably the most reliable outdoor chilli plant from my experience, with it producing copious amounts of chillies, well into November in previous years. It stands up well to the cold and wet, producing abundant pods that carry a considerable kick of heat. I would grow this every year just for it's reliability. A solid chilli. Plants in the ground grow waaaaay bigger than ones in pots, as evidenced in my pics. Overall score - 8/10

 

large.apache_1.jpg

large.apache_2.jpg

large.apache_3.jpg

large.img_9241.jpg

 

 

Basket of Fire - like the Apache, this is a very easy pepper plant to grow, particularly in a cool, temperate climate. Although the unripe chillies start off a rather dull green/grey colour (which they remain for some time) they will eventually turn to yellow before taking on purple hues and turning orange, before finally red. They certainly exhibit a spectrum of colours come August, which is highly ornamental. These pods also carry a considerable kick, hence the name. Can't fault it. 8/10.

 

large.basket_of_fire_1.jpg

large.img_9239.jpg

 

 

Bhut Jolokia White - I found this highly ornamental come late August/early September, with nice tear drop shaped pods, that turn from green, to yellow, to white. It is very hot as well, in the 1,000,000 SHU range. So go easy. It's not the earliest to mature, so be sure to start this one nice and early, by February at the latest I would say, to ensure you are harvesting by September. I can't really fault this one, except it is a little bit on the late side to mature, as is the case with all habaneros. But nonetheless, a good pepper plant. I would grow again. 7/10

 

large.img_9233.jpg

large.img_9250.jpg

 

 

Bolivian Rainbow - by far the smallest chilli plant that I have ever grown. It is not overly productive, but the pods carry a considerable amount of heat. It is also supposed to be one of the most ornamental and colourful varieties in existence, but I did not see that spectrum of colours. I was somewhat disappointed by the lack of a colour show. Peppers seemed to go from green, to yellow, to red, with very little, if any purple, as they are depicted in images. I'm not sure whether I will grow this variety again. The Basket of Fire was more colourful. Overall score - 5/10

 

large.bolivian_rainbow_1.jpg

large.bolivian_rainbow_2.jpg

 

 

Carolina Reaper - The only pepper in my collection that I have not yet harvested any chillies from. I'm still about 3 weeks away from taking the first pods from this one. Very, very slow out of the blocks, in terms of germination, slow early growth and although it picked up come July and grew much, much quicker, it was still very slow at setting fruit. You need a lot of patience with this one. I recommend starting these as early as possible, like in January, if you want to harvest by late August/early September. Slow growth all around. But you've got to grow this one once, just to say you've done it. Overall score - still pending.

 

large.carolina_reaper.jpg

 

 

Chocolate Habanero - I had 2 of these and both were a right pain in the arse to grow during the early stages, with them barely growing during the cooler spring weather and looking somewhat unhealthy. But come June, they started taking off and have grown to quite big proportions since then, although like other Habanero types, it is always going to be quite late to set fruit, and to ripen, so best to start these as early as possible. First pods were harvested in early September and it is definitely one of the better tasting habaneros. 7/10. 

 

large.img_9227.jpg

large.img_9226.jpg

large.img_9234.jpg

 

 

Douglah - plants grow big, with large side branches and big brown pods. I can't really fault the growth, but like most Habanero types, it can take a while to set fruit and to finally ripen, so start seeds early! I picked my first ones in late August. There isn't much smell to these peppers at first glance, but fuck me, these pods are hot! Just one pod is enough to make a rather spicy dish for 3-4 people. And it still had me reaching for the milk! This has to be on par with the Carolina Reaper for spiciness, in my opinion. It'll melt your fucking face off! 8/10.

 

large.douglah_1.jpg

large.douglah_2.jpg

large.5b8eadd6b0680_Douglahpods.jpg

 

 

Jalapeno Early - very quick growing and vigorous, and consequently very early to fruit, with the first peppers ready by late June. This was the second earliest plant to be picked and it is highly productive with 4 of these plants producing well over 150 peppers between them so far. It does excellent in the UK climate and is hard to fault, but one issue is that it can be prone to snapping, with all 4 plants experiencing breaks to some degree, due to high winds, the weight of the chillies, or them getting knocked. Nonetheless, it should be on every UK grower's list still! 9/10. 

 

large.jalapeno_early.jpg

large.img_9243.jpg

 

 

Naga Bhutlah (chocolate) - Holy shit! This is one HOT pepper and easily comparable in terms of heat with the Reaper & Douglah. I cut one in half and took the plunge, and besides bringing me to tears, I also physically felt sick from it. Just overwhelmingly hot! It must be at least 2,000,000SHU. Appearance and growth rates were almost identical to the Douglah, but the taste is distinctively different. It's definitely another novelty pepper. As with all Habanero types, start seeds early in winter. Grow it if you dare. You've been warned. 7/10.

 

large.img_9229.jpg

large.img_9230.jpg

 

 

Padron - fast growing and highly productively, it was also the earliest pepper variety to set fruit and harvest, with peppers being picked as early as mid June! The biggest plant alone has produced around 100 peppers this year! They are best picked early, and fried in olive oil to make Pimientos de Padron, a popular Basque dish. If the peppers are left on the branch, they can grow to gigantic proportions as shown below, and pack far, far more heat! And once they turn red, they are hot as hell! Probably the best pepper to grow in the UK as it stands up very well to our climate. 9/10.

 

large.padron_1.jpg

large.padron_2.jpg

large.padron_3.jpg

 

 

Purple Tiger - This ornamental plant has lovely purple flowers and is very similar looking to the Zimbabwe Black variety, but the chillies on this are bigger and fuller. The pods also retain their purple/black colour much more, with pods remaining dark coloured for many, many weeks before eventually turning red. The taste is somewhat sour when picked too early, so best left on for as long as possible, or taken when red. The purplish/black pods are relatively mild and taste of grape in my opinion. 7/10

 

large.purple_tiger_1.jpg

large.purple_tiger_2.jpg

large.img_9246.jpg

 

 

Serrano - One of my favourite chillies this year, with pods that ripen very, very quickly once they start being produced (red within 3-4 weeks). The first fully ripened chillies came down in late July, with a considerable kick in the heat department. These also do very well in the UK climate and stand up well to cool nighttime temps. This should be on every UK chilli grower's list. I will probably overwinter the plant in the picture below. 9/10

 

large.serrano_1.jpg

large.serrano_2.jpg

large.serrano_3.jpg

 

 

Tabasco - This thing is slower than a stoned snail moving through super glue. Fucking hell. I won't be cropping any peppers off this until October, given how slow it is to grow, and how long it takes to set fruit, which is beyond ridiculous when growing in the UK climate. And it was started from seed fairly early, in February! I doubt I will bother growing Tabasco gain. In what has been a very good season for peppers, this is one of only 2 chilli varieties that have not performed. I'll probably end up bringing this inside to finish. Overall rating - 4/10.

 

large.img_9244.jpg

large.img_9245.jpg

 

 

Trinidad Perfume - Easily my favourite pepper this year! The ornamental, yellow/orange pods have a unique, fruity taste with only a minor hint of spice. You can eat these peppers by the truckload. And they taste so bloody good! The first pods weren't ready until mid August, so try and start this early, by January or February, for earlier harvests and bigger yields. Definitely one to overwinter and grow each year, just for it's uniqueness! Once you try it, you will grow it year on year. 10/10.  

 

large.t_perfume_1.jpg

large.t_perfume_2.jpg

 

 

Zimbabwe Black - a nice ornamental chilli with purple tinted foliage. One positive I found, was this plant to be relatively early to mature, with the first red chillies appearing as soon as early July. But my one gripe is that the pods are very, very small. The smallest pods this year by a country mile. I might cross this with a bigger podded purple variety that I can grow out next year. 7/10

 

large.zimbabwe_black_1.jpg

large.zimbabwe_black_2.jpg

 

 

This morning's pepper haul...

 

large.img_9251.jpg

large.img_9252.jpg

 

:yinyang:

I thought this about chillis......not Jack and the beanstalk. Nice chillis man!!!

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7 hours ago, vortex said:

my second scotch bonnet is covered in flowers ,  but no pods ...  any ideas  how late they can keep going  into winter please ?

Have you pollinated? If not, you need to take a small soft paintbrush or carefully use your finger to pollinate your plants. To do it just gently take some pollen from one or two of the flowers and spread it onto the other flowers, you should start to see some chillis start to form shortly after.

Edited by Bwm
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1 hour ago, Bwm said:

I’ve got some Kashmiri chilli seeds, having trouble germinating them though. Really want this variety for my Indian dishes. I’m pretty good at authentic Indian food so thought some fresh Kashmiris would be great as it’s the only ingredient I can’t get fresh. Any pointers guys?

Seeds can be very slow for chillies, I would leave tem in a warm and moist place for up to 28 days.  My warm and moist place is a small sealed tupperware box, placed on broadband modem, but not covering all of the ventilation holes.  May not be safe, but has worked pretty well.  Inside the boxes is moist kitchen paper.


You could try using root riot style germination, although I would not want to waste those oon dud seeds.  If the seeds are not germinating at all, they are probably old, or been exposed to the wrong conditions, or were maybe not viable to start with.

 

The modem method above has worked for me, and also worked when the germination was of a notoriously difficult seed to germinate (capsicum lanceolatum).  I only got one seed to germinate, but that has gifted me many more of this plant, via propagation via cuttings (much easier than seed!).  Please note that I did not get my seeds from Fatalii.net, but from a personal enthusiast grower on a forum. If I ever get any flowers on these I will be so happy, as I would like to share seed of these rare and unusual plants.

Edited by worzel

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