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namkha

THC and CBD in drug cannabis strains

60 posts in this topic

DR. P, for me the smoke test is the only test and i think that goes for most ppl.

its good that u guys with real tech skills are investigating the THC, CBD content of various strains.

as a Med grower I keep a close watch on this thread

and Namkha it would be sooooo great if u can give an approximate guide to the THC, CBD content of your seeds.

but i think, in some cases, that may prove v difficult with the phenotype variations from your seed suppliers.

what i would really like to know is, what strain or strains were used as the basis for creating Sativex. but thats not going to happen. :spliff:

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The strains which the company GW Pharmaceuticals is using are developed by the company Hortapharm stationed in the Netherlands.I think for the THC-strain they used a Thai strain and for the CBD strain hemp of a some kind.

Namaste :yep:

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haha funny stuff :)

yeah, I'm not claiming I've entirely got my head round that Hillig paper - someone somewhere has a list of the 200 or so vars. he tested, which would make things a lot clearer

Namkha

If you really want to get your head around that paper, then Hillig's article on "Genetic evidence for speciation in Cannabis" is a must-read. It includes a list of the strains he included in his research, and is the foundation on which his other studies are built. I picked up a copy of his dissertation on-line , and it cost less than an eighth of sticky bud. It's a heavy slog, but as they say, "no pain, no gain." :doh:

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Welcome to UK420 Uncle Bugpoop and thank you so very much for that link! :eek::):doh:

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does any one have a complete list of Hillig's papers?

A chemotaxnomoic analysis of cannabinoid variation in cannabis (Cannabaceae)

Karl W. Hillig2 and Paul G. Mahlberg

Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 USA

http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/full/91/6/966

2004 - 2004

Genetic evidence for speciation in Cannabis (Cannabaceae)

Karl Hillig

2005

A systematic investigation of cannabis

Karl Hillig

2005

if you can incluude links for where they can be read or downloaded that would be ideal

many thanks

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The strains which the company GW Pharmaceuticals is using are developed by the company Hortapharm stationed in the Netherlands.I think for the THC-strain they used a Thai strain and for the CBD strain hemp of a some kind.

I believe that strain is called Bedrocan.

This is the most recent paper that I've been reading, in relation to my extraction experiments and tincture making. It was in this paper I learned about Bedrocan. Very interesting reading, although the bottom line for non-scientists is what we already knew - higher alcohol content = better absorption of cannibinoids.

The paper is called:

Direct NMR analysis of cannabis water extracts and tinctures and semi-quantitative data on Δ9-THC and Δ9-THC-acid (2007)

M. Politia, W. Peschela, N. Wilsona, M. Zlohb, J.M. Prietoa, , and M. Heinricha

University of London

Broken link to the PDF here: hxxp://eprints.pharmacy.ac.uk/880/1/PrietoNMR.pdf

An interesting extract - also because you don't see this kind of stuff in a scientific journal generally... :headbang:

"All relevant Home Office licenses for growing, transproting

and possession of cannabis have been in place at

all times. The seeds of Northern Lights 5 crossed with Haze

(labelled CS) were bought from the Pukka Seed Company,

Guildford, UK. This cannabis cultivar was grown under

hydroponic conditions. Plants grown in pods filled with

ceramic beads where nutrient rich water was pumped to

the base of the plant 4 times a day. Growing conditions

were the following: 70% Humidity, 24 C Temperature,

5.5–6 pH of water, 1300 ppm of CO2, metal halides

600 W for vegetative cycle (18 h a day cycle), and sodium’s

1000 W for blooming (18 h then slowly reduced to 12 h).

The seeds were planted on 15/08/2005, the first males were

removed on 27/09/2005 and the females were harvested on

02/12/2005. Bedrocan (labelled Bed) was received in 2006

from the Office of Medicinal Cannabis, Ministry of Health,

Welfare and Sports, The Hague, The Netherlands. Illicit

material (labelled IM) was provided in 2004 by the Home

Office, UK. Cannabidiol-rich and non-cannabinoid cultivars

(labelled CBD and labelled NC, respectively) were

received in 2005 from the ISCI (Experimental Institute

for the Industrial Crop), Rovigo, Italy."

Edited by GreenNinja

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The seeds of Northern Lights 5 crossed with Haze

(labelled CS) were bought from the Pukka Seed Company,

Guildford, UK.

:doh: Scientists eh.........you'd have thought they would have done a bit of research and realised that *F*ukka are a rip-off........ :rofl:. I hope that the research funding that bought those seeds didn't come from public monies........ :rolleyes:

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The strains which the company GW Pharmaceuticals is using are developed by the company Hortapharm stationed in the Netherlands.I think for the THC-strain they used a Thai strain and for the CBD strain hemp of a some kind.

I believe that strain is called Bedrocan.

Bedrocan is a Jack Herer pheno which they use.The company produced in the past Jack Herer seeds for Sensi Seed Bank.

Namaste lol

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does any one have a complete list of Hillig's papers?

A chemotaxnomoic analysis of cannabinoid variation in cannabis (Cannabaceae)

Karl W. Hillig2 and Paul G. Mahlberg

Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 USA

http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/full/91/6/966

2004 - 2004

Genetic evidence for speciation in Cannabis (Cannabaceae)

Karl Hillig

2005

A systematic investigation of cannabis

Karl Hillig

2005

if you can incluude links for where they can be read or downloaded that would be ideal

many thanks

Don't know if it's a complete list, but here's what I have.

Hillig, Karl William. 2005. A systematic investigation of Cannabis. Doctoral dissertation, Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana.

The dissertation includes the following three articles, as well as a chapter on morphological variation, and introductory and concluding chapters. It's cheaper to buy the dissertation than the individual articles. You'll have to run a search for it at the link provided.

Hillig, Karl W. 2005. Genetic evidence for speciation in Cannabis (Cannabaceae). Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution 52: 161-180.

note: This is the first article of the series, but was delayed in publication. It should be read first, since the subsequent articles are based on this one.

Hillig, Karl W. 2004. A chemotaxonomic analysis of cannabinoid variation in Cannabis (Cannabaceae). American Journal of Botany 91(6): 966-975.

Hillig, Karl W. 2004. A chemotaxonomic analysis of terpenoid variation in Cannabis. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 32:875-891.

---

Hillig, Karl W. 2005. A combined analysis of agronomic traits and allozyme allele frequencies for 69 Cannabis accessions. Journal of Industrial Hemp 10(1): 17-30.

Hillig, Karl W. 2004. A multivariate analysis of allozyme variation in 93 Cannabis accessions from the VIR germplasm collection. Journal of Industrial Hemp 9(2): 5-22.

Hillig, Karl. 2002. Letter to the editor. Journal of Industrial Hemp 7(1): 5-6.

Hillig also coauthored a series of articles with John M. McPartland on pests and diseases of Cannabis that were published in the Journal of Industrial Hemp between 2003 and 2008, including:

McPartland, John M. and Karl W. Hillig. 2003. The hemp russet mite. Journal of Industrial Hemp 8(2): 107-112.

McPartland, John M. and Karl W. Hillig. 2004. Striatura ulcerosa. Journal of Industrial Hemp 9(1): 89-96.

etc.

Edited by Uncle Bugpoop
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nice - many thanks :rofl:

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Superb thread!

Sublime.

:ninja:

Woof

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*bump*

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History of Cannabis and its Preparations in Saga, Science and Sobriquet

by Ethan Russo (2007)

on Hillig and Mahlbergs' chemotaxonomy

"A geographic map based on the results depicted an epicenter of origin for C. sativa in current Kazakhstan, and one for C. indica in the Western Himalayas"

http://www.suomenkannabisyhdistys.org/media/documents/Russo2007.pdf

Edited by namkha

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CBD Search Parvati, Lebanese

http://www.uk420.com/boards/index.php?showtopic=259297

Test Results

the only really reliable method is gas chromatography - but this is an interesting thread searching a couple of RSC strains for CBD

and this is another grow of Parvati looking for CBD

Medicinal Parvati Grow fybromyalgia, pain, COPD (pulmonary disease)

http://www.uk420.com/boards/index.php?showtopic=292871&st=0

fybromyalgia, pain, COPD (pulmonary disease

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Robert Clarke interview with NORML NZ pre-2008 (original webpage now down)

You've done a bit of research on the origins of cannabis. Is the difference between indica and sativa as simple as thin and fat leaves?

RCC - There is some new genetic based work by Karl Hillig at Indiana University, trying to work out the taxonomy of Cannabis. The main thing, is that all that Cannabis Sativa really should represent, is the narrow leaf hemp varieties from Western Europe which spread to a few other places like Chile and possibly New Mexico, and everything else should be called Cannabis Indica. I’m now using this new system - until some taxonomist changes it again!

What changed the system?

RCC - Looking at the direct gene products of cannabis. The gene technology as well as looking at cannabinoid data, THC, terpene data and other plants.

So are we smoking any Sativa at all these days?

RCC - Actually we don’t smoke sativas, it is all indicas. All the rest of the world’s hemp, drug, medical, seed and other varieties should most likely be called the indica variety. There are four different subgroups of indica that are now recognised. Cannabis Indica Biotype Afghanica is what we call Indica now. Cannabis Indica Biotype Chinensis is broad-leafed hemp from China, Japan & Korea. Cannabis Indica Spontania is from North India, Nepali, Burma. These were called the drug sativas but are now better called Cannabis Indica Indica. Cannabis Indica Caferus Anacus may represent the wild “feral” types that the other domesticated subgroups came from.

To make it easier we should just go back to what they look like. Let’s forget about where they come from. We should call what we think of as hemp from Europe, as Narrow leafed hemp. The other hemp is Chinese, Korean, Japanese and Northern Vietnam. These are broad-leafed hemp. They are not as low in THC or as high in CBD (cannabidiol) as the European ones but they are not drugs. And then you have the two drug cannabis gene pools which would be narrow leafed drug high THC varieties - Indian , Nepali, Thai, Indonesian, African, Mexican and Columbian, with narrow leafs and high THC . Afghan varieties which are now called Indica, erroneously, should be called Broad leafed drug varieties . Now of course we have hybrids of narrow and brood leafed but no hybrids of Sativa, the narrow leafed hemp. So actually the only true Indica-Sativa hybrids are hemp, and what people smoke are all Indicas.

here is his new book with Mark Merlin

Cannabis: Evolution and Ethnobotany

by Robert C. Clarke (Author) & Mark D. Merlin (Author), May 2013

http://www.uk420.com/boards/index.php?showtopic=262195&view=findpost&p=3442278

Edited by namkha

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