Welcome to UK420

Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to contribute to this site by submitting your own content or replying to existing content. You'll be able to customize your profile, receive reputation points as a reward for submitting content, while also communicating with other members via your own private inbox, plus much more!

This message will be removed once you have signed in.


Search the Community: Showing results for tags 'daily mail'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Welcome to UK420
    • New Members
  • Cultivation
    • Strain Base
    • Breeders Help Desks
    • Compost and Pots
    • Hydroponics
    • Outdoor Growing
    • Propagation, Cloning and Mother Plants
    • Auto Flowering
    • Growroom Design
    • Problem Solver
    • Harvesting and Processing
    • Grow Diaries
    • Cream Of The Crop
  • Cannabis Culture
    • News, Views and Politics
    • Medicinal Cannabis
    • Smokers Lounge
    • Uk420 Competitions
  • Sponsor Support
    • Intense Nutrients
    • Vapefiend - The Vaporizer Specialists
    • DIY LED UK
    • Gro-zone Hydro

Calendars

  • Community Calendar

Found 8 results

  1. Hi folks, Daily mail at it again The comments give hope though Cannabis oil sold as a health product in Britain can get users 'high', study finds Researchers found driving under the influence of CBD cannabis ‘may be harmful' The products have soared in popularity amid claims they help combat ailments The legal version of cannabis sold as a health product in the UK can get users ‘high’ and even make it dangerous to drive, a study has found. Cannabis oils and capsules said to help reduce anxiety and pain are on sale in high street stores including Holland & Barrett and are used by more than 250,000 Britons. They are sold legally because they contain no more than 0.2 per cent of the mind-altering substance tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is found in the illegal version of the drug. But now scientists have found that the active ingredient in these products, cannabidiol (CBD), is also psychoactive. In the study, subjects used a vape to inhale different strains of cannabis. Those using the version containing CBD but not illegal THC reported levels of intoxication three times that of those who used only a placebo. In addition, experts said subjects felt detached from reality. Scientists from Wollongong University in Australia concluded that driving under the influence of CBD cannabis ‘may be harmful’. The finding comes amid calls for the form of cannabis containing THC to also be legalised for medicinal and recreational purposes. Last night, Tory MP Craig Mackinlay, chairman of an All- Party Parliamentary Group investigating the effects of cannabis on the brain, said: ‘This is a startling revelation. For many years we have been told that THC was the key cause of cognitive issues stemming from cannabis, and that CBD held the “holy grail” of benefits. ‘These studies show that it is far more complex than simply isolating a few inherent compounds. Cannabis in its raw form contains more than 400 chemicals, so how long will it be until the next cure-all is miraculously discovered by pro-legalisers, only to be put down by science once again? ‘It is high time for there to be a full scientific investigation into the harmful effects of cannabis and its chemical compounds to put this misinformation to rest once and for all.’ Almost £6 million of CBD health supplements were sold last year. The products cost up to £60 and have soared in popularity amid claims that they help combat anxiety, insomnia and muscle and joint pain. There is also an emerging market of recreational CBD cannabis. Globally, CBD cannabis is expected to be worth almost £2 billion by next year, with dozens of companies poised to invest in the burgeoning industry. https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-6712725/amp/Legal-cannabis-oil-sold-British-health-shops-users-high-study-shows.html
  2. Hi The 'Big Buddha' flooding UK with cannabis seeds... sold openly on your local high street: How 'headshop' dealers make millions - and a mockery of drug laws - by passing off hallucinogenic skunk starter kits as 'souvenirs' Daily Mail By Simon Murphy 7 December 2014 Flashing a smug grin as he poses proudly in a field of flourishing cannabis plants, this is the businessman responsible for allegedly flooding Britain with high-strength cannabis, fuelling a multi-million-pound market in home-grown illegal drugs. Milo Yung, who calls himself ‘the Big Buddha’, claims to be the founder of Britain’s ‘number one’ brand of cannabis, which is sold around the country in colourful packets boasting of the product’s ‘unique high’ and ‘old skool taste’. Despite the cartoon of a smiling Buddha on the label, buyers would have no doubt that they are buying seeds to grow skunk – a potent, high-strength form of cannabis which has been blamed for an epidemic of mental health problems among users. There have even been boasts that Big Buddha Cheese won first prize in a recent ‘Cannabis Cup’ to produce strong, psychoactive strains. But astonishingly, while it is illegal to grow, use or sell cannabis in Britain, Yung’s product can be bought entirely legally over the counter in hundreds of high street shops across the country – because he is selling the seeds, not the plants or its products themselves. An investigation by The Mail on Sunday has revealed just how easy it is to buy these seeds in Britain. We can also reveal how two businessmen from the West Midlands are exploiting this loophole, earning a highly lucrative income from their expanding empire. Because Customs officials appear powerless to seize the seeds, Big Buddha appears to be indirectly inspiring the explosion of up to 500,000 cannabis farms and making a mockery of Britain’s drug laws. Our reporters visited so-called ‘headshops’ in London, Exeter and Edinburgh, which all openly sell cannabis seeds alongside the materials needed to cultivate and use the drug. Big Buddha Cheese came highly recommended by staff working at the shops in London and Edinburgh, with one claiming to have sold ‘hundreds’ of the packets, although they are carefully marketed as ‘souvenirs’. The seeds are also openly sold online, with a disclaimer on the company’s website claiming: ‘All seeds are sold as souvenirs only. All seeds are sold as souvenirs and grow information is for educational reference only. All products ordered will only be used in a lawful manner.’ But once bought and planted, instructions on the packet make clear that the seeds can be grown to produce flowering cannabis plants and a crop of illegal drugs within seven to nine weeks. A packet of ten seeds – sold for £55.50 or even cheaper online – can produce an equal number of plants, which would be enough to grow drugs with a street value of more than £40,000 a year. The Mail on Sunday has traced Big Buddha Seeds Company – fronted by Yung with his business partner Andrew Hines – to a cannabis growing operation across Europe, including Spain, where laws permit the use and cultivation of the plants for personal use. Yung, 40, openly brags about his cannabis production, touring the world visiting marijuana festivals promoting his brand of strong skunk which he has spent years developing by cross-breeding plants. But The Mail on Sunday can reveal that Yung’s real name is Michael Walong Ng, and he grew up in Birmingham. Until two years ago, he was registered as living with his 64-year-old father in a modest £240,000 semi-detached property in the city’s suburbs. It is a far cry from his lifestyle now. Yung currently resides on Ibiza, where he drives a Mercedes, boasts about buying a yacht and mixes with celebrities in the Spanish party island’s most exclusive clubs. A brief look at his Facebook page reveals him openly smoking cannabis and bragging about his exploits. On Friday, he posted a picture of a Moroccan form of hash – a resin collected from the flowers of cannabis plants – with the message: ‘This weekend is going to be celebrated in style!!’ Yung also spoke freely in an interview he gave under his Big Buddha alias, where he described growing cannabis as being ‘a true love in my life.’ Talking about his early days in the business, he added: ‘I produced my first crop of cheese... ‘I immediately knew what to do with it, make this available to everyone to enjoy. At that time a lot of trouble happened; people around me were getting busted so I moved away to Spain. ‘I spent time in the southern Spanish growing belt, learning a little more about the way of the land. We are now currently residing between Spain and England, and have manufacturers based across Europe.’ Though Yung appears to be the face of the firm, his business partner keeps a lower profile. Hines, 45, is the sole director of BBSCO Ltd – thought to stand for Big Buddha Seeds Company – the UK registered firm behind their empire. The company’s latest accounts show that its net assets have increased threefold in a single year to £294,542 in 2014, suggesting the company is thriving. Hines could not be reached for comment last night, and Yung did not respond to repeated requests for comment. Hines has previously registered several trademarks for the business, openly available to browse on the internet, including ‘BBCP’ and ‘big buddha’, and ‘cheese’. Meanwhile, BBSCO Ltd has trademarked ‘Big Buddha Seeds’, ‘Blue Cheese’, ‘Big Buddha Cheese’ and ‘Cheese Powder’. A Birmingham PO box address has been listed by Hines, which matches an address previously given for the company. This newspaper’s investigation sparked fury among anti-drugs campaigners last night, who said current legislation was allowing money to be made from ‘ruining people’s lives’. Mary Brett, chairman of Cannabis Skunk Sense, said: ‘It’s just contemptible. I’ve got absolutely no time for these people. They don’t seem to care that kids’ and families’ lives are completely ruined. ‘At the expense of all these kids, ruining their lives, they’re living the life of Riley. This loophole for cannabis seeds needs to be closed now before we go any further, before any more kids’ lives are subjected to the awful damage. Cannabis acts as a gateway to harder drugs. We’ve got members in our charity who’ve had children start on cannabis, go on to a harder drug and they’ve died. We have several bereaved parents.’ Current laws permit the sale of cannabis seeds, including hemp, which has traditionally been used for bird seed. But the law provides a loophole which, bizarrely, allows headshops also to sell seeds which, when grown, produce a highly potent skunk. Hundreds of thousands of suburban houses across the country have been converted into hidden marijuana factories after an explosion in production in recent years. Only last week, police seized £250,000 worth of plants from a makeshift cannabis farm hidden inside an old church in Burnley. Norman Baker, who resigned as a Home Office Minister last month after producing a report recommending headshops be closed down, said: ‘There are legitimate uses for hemp seeds so we have to be careful not to damage legitimate business and industry. ‘However, if there is a strain that is appearing that has no legitimate use and is associated with a damaging outcome, then the Government should look at that particular issue. ‘I’m very keen the Government should direct their resources at those people who are making money out of drugs and causing misery rather than pursuing users.’ HMRC confirmed that the importing of cannabis seeds is perfectly legal, while the Home Office refused to comment specifically on the loophole in the law. A spokesman said: ‘Any attempt to germinate cannabis seeds is considered to be cultivation, which is illegal under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. It is also an offence to incite a person to cultivate cannabis or to sell any article believing it to be used for prepare a controlled drug for administration. ‘There are no plans to review the Misuse of Drugs Act, which provides a robust legislative framework for protecting the public from the harm posed by illegal drugs.’ Susan Bedack, whose 29-year-old son was committed to a psychiatric hospital after developing schizophrenia following years of cannabis use, said: ‘They should be locked up, absolutely. But that’s not going to happen because we’re too soft in this country. ‘They have to be arrested for what they’re doing. All they’re interested in is money. They don’t care about human life, they don’t care about people like my son who had his whole life ruined. ‘And not only his life. I had a good life. Not any more. And it’s all because of this. ‘My son was an exceptionally bright child – he didn’t even drink or smoke cigarettes. He was a healthy young man. To see him like this, it’s heart-breaking.’ Huge rise in skunk-triggered illness By JONATHAN PETRE FOR THE MAIL ON SUNDAY Young people are being treated in record numbers for mental health problems which have been caused by cannabis. Official figures show more than 5,000 under-25s were treated for addiction and psychiatric problems with the drug over the past year. Experts believe the rise has been caused by new strains of cannabis – known as skunk – which are more potent than those grown in the past. And they say the alarming figures might have been even worse were it not for the overall numbers of cannabis users falling. Just 15 per cent of 16- to 24-year-olds smoked the drug last year, down from a peak of 28 per cent in 1998. The figures from Public Health England show 5,039 youngsters aged 18 to 24 started treatment for problems connected with cannabis last year – a rise of 51 per cent on the 3,328 who sought help eight years ago. The statistics also reveal that 43 per cent of under-25s entering drug treatment programmes sought help for cannabis use, compared with just 18 per cent eight years ago. At the same time, youngsters being helped for heroin addiction has fallen from 40 per cent to 16 per cent, and for heroin and crack from 21 per cent to 11 per cent. Addiction experts say the cannabis figures can be traced to powerful new strains of the drug entering the market. In the past, it would have been grown in basement conditions under normal lights. But growers are now engineering strains using much more powerful lighting, with some cannabis having up to 24 per cent levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its primary psychoactive compound. Dr Owen Bowden-Jones, a specialist in addictions based at the Priory Hospital in Roehampton, South-West London, said: ‘The number of under-25s entering treatment for cannabis is rising. ‘Compared to a few decades ago, the cannabis being sold is generally considerably more potent, with higher concentrations of the psychoactive chemicals. ‘We are also seeing the use of synthetic cannabinoids, some of which appear to be much stronger than even the strongest herbal cannabis. ‘Anecdotal evidence suggests the synthetics can cause more physical and psychiatric problems.’ DEALER BRAGGING ABOUT SMOKING WITH THE STARS Big Buddha Cheese claims to be endorsed by a host of celebrities, including Hunger Games star Woody Harrelson. Milo Yung, who calls himself ‘the Big Buddha’, has posted several photos of himself alongside the Oscar-nominated star, including a snap of them sitting outside a cannabis cafe. In an interview, Yung said: ‘We are also constantly pushing the BBC [big Buddha Cheese] to celebrities to endorse. So far we have smoked with Howard Marks, Noel Gallagher, Jamiroquai, Bez from Happy Mondays – even the new single from Sean Paul mentions the cheese, from when we gave him some last year. ‘I so believe in our products, so the more we can promote our UK Cheese all around the world, THE BETTER!’ Harrelson has been a keen proponent of legalising cannabis and has said: ‘Everyone should have the right to use whatever drug they choose.’ 'I CAN TELL YOU WHERE TO BUY EQUIPMENT' Cannabis seeds can be bought over the counter in shops across Britain. Traders exploit a legal loophole to sell the seeds as ‘souvenirs’ – but are strictly forbidden under law from directly encouraging the illegal cultivation of drugs. But the packaging and the subtext of the sales patter is clear – they can be used to grow high-strength ‘super skunk’. The Mail on Sunday bought a packet of ten ‘Big Buddha Cheese’ seeds from the Mystical Headshop in East London for £55.50, with an employee boasting he had ‘sold hundreds’ of packets. A different employee then wrote down the address of another shop in North London where the equipment needed to grow cannabis – lamps, tin foil, fans, timers, pots – could be bought for under £400. Shop owner Ian Dayarm said: ‘We are stopping selling the seeds and our staff are being retrained.’ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2863801/The-Big-Buddha-flooding-UK-cannabis-seeds-sold-openly-local-high-street-headshop-dealers-make-millions-mockery-drug-laws-passing-hallucinogenic-skunk-starter-kits-souvenirs.html 136 Comments and (The Expert Vid, On Link) Bongme
  3. Hi What a dope! Marijuana farmer is arrested after posting YouTube video of himself giving a 'tour' of his crops http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUtISGyC5pU A 46-year-old man claiming to have terminal cancer has been busted on drug charges after posting a video of himself walking through his towering marijuana crop. Police nabbed Connecticut's William Bradley yesterday after spotting the YouTube clip called 'Hope Garden' when it was posted in October. In the seven-minute video, Bradley welcomed people to his 'garden' and said he was growing pot because he had cancer. He also begged for donations because he wanted to give away the buds to people who needed them for medical reasons. During the rambling clip, Bradley explained his predicament and occasionally stopped to smell the plants. 'This bouquet of flowers is for everyone. I want everyone to see how beautiful they are,' he said, inhaling the crop. 'They smell so nice. They'll be harvesting in about two weeks. 'As you can see, God has gifted me with an abundance and it’s more than I need. I want to be able to help people like myself and I don’t have the money to do that.' Bradley also offered his full name and postal address in the video for potential donors - leading police directly to him. However, the Clinton resident insisted he had done nothing wrong. He said he was motivated by a need to help others who were suffering from similar illnesses and, like him, weren't enrolled in the state's medical marijuana program. 'I want legalization for people with terminal illnesses,' he told New York Daily News. 'It's a sin. It's only an herbal remedy, it's not a narcotic. '(I made the video) so I could live more comfortably. It shows my desperation.' The disability benefits recipient said his doctors refused to prescribe medication for his treatment, particularly after he was seriously injured in a motorcycle accident. 'I'm a marcher,' he said. 'I will not stop fighting, because I know in my heart of hearts I'm right.' Police said they seized two pounds of weed, 20 grams of hashish, two bags of cocaine, $1,000 in cash and drug paraphernalia from a storage unit Bradley used near his home. Bradley was charged with possession of narcotics with intent to sell, possession of drug paraphernalia and operating a drug factory. He was released on $5,000 bond after he was arraigned. Bradley reportedly has a history of possessing and selling drugs. The Hartford Courant reported he was arrested in 2008 for operating a drug factory. Police found more than 10 pounds of pot, hashish and mushrooms during a raid at his home. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2539491/Dopey-marijuana-farmer-arrested-posting-YouTube-video-giving-tour-crops.html 14 Comments at this time Bongme
  4. Hi Colorado airport installs 'amnesty boxes' for passengers who accidentally bring marijuana into the airport - but they won't be able to get it back By Ashley Collman 15 January 2014 Marijuana may feel like a god-given right to Colorado residents following the legalization of recreational pot, but like bottled water, sharp objects or lighters, it's one of the many things that still aren't allowed on planes. In a show of mercy, the Colorado Springs Airport has installed amnesty boxes where passengers who accidentally bring pot into the airport can surrender it without facing fines of up to $2500 or even possible jail time if caught with the controlled substance. Like amnesty boxes for other banned items, passengers can drop off the pot before going through security but unfortunately won't be able to get it back as it will be destroyed by the police. While recreational marijuana was made legal in Colorado this year on January 1, it is completely banned in all areas of the airport due to federal aviation regulations which make it illegal to operate a civil aircraft with the knowledge that marijuana is on board. The Colorado Springs airport officially outlawed pot in the airport on January 10, following Denver International Airport which put up signs warning that the substance was banned before legalization in the new year. It's unclear whether similar amnesty boxes had been set up at the Denver Airport. MailOnline's calls to the airport were not immediately returned Wednesday morning. Amnesty boxes for the Colorado Springs airport were being shipped after the prohibition and are expected to be installed sometime today. Officials are recommending that people leave their marijuana in the car before entering the airport. The ban applies to all airport entrants, including those with medical marijuana perscriptions and those traveling within the state and to other states where the substance is legal (like Washington). According to the new law, all Colorado residents over the age of 21 are allowed to purchase up to an ounce of recreational marijuana while out-of-staters can buy a quarter-ounce. Marijuana bought in the state is not allowed to be transported across state lines, which is another reason the airports have instituted the ban. Some 136 retail stores have been issued cannabis licenses this year and apparently demand is so high that many have been running out of inventory. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2539963/Colorado-airport-installs-amnesty-boxes-passengers-accidentally-bring-marijuana-airport-wont-able-back.html Add Comments Bongme
  5. .Hi 'Reclusive' care home worker obsessed with TV killer Dexter stabbed his mother 53 times and left her to bleed to death after they rowed about his cannabis smoking .Mark Howe repeatedly stabbed and slashed his mother in brutal attack .He left her to bleed to death on bedroom floor at family home in Leicester .A court heard Howe was 'a recluse' obsessed with TV series Dexter .Sentenced to life in prison and told he would have to serve at least 21 years and six months before he could be considered for release By James Rush 15 January 2014 A care home worker obsessed with TV serial killer Dexter has been jailed after he admitted murdering his mother after the pair had rowed about his cannabis smoking. Mark Howe repeatedly stabbed and slashed Katrina Wardle in the face, mouth, neck, chest and arms before leaving her to bleed to death on her bedroom floor in an 'appallingly savage' attack. A judge said the brutal assault was 'akin to torture'. The 21-year-old, who a court heard 'lived in a fantasy world', attacked Mrs Wardle, 48, at the family home in St Matthew’s, Leicester, in the early hours of July 16 last year. Leicester Crown Court was told Howe was 'a recluse' obsessed with US TV series Dexter, which features a fictional police worker, Dexter Morgan, leading a double life as a serial knife-wielding killer. He used a photograph of Dexter Morgan with a blood-splattered face as his own Facebook profile picture - and had searched ‘Dexter’s kill knife’ on the internet in the run-up to the killing. Judge Mr Justice Haddon-Cave sentenced Howe to life in prison, and told him he would have to serve at least 21 years and six months before he could be considered for release. He added: 'You attacked your mother with appalling savagery, causing more than 53 separate wounds. One can only imagine the horror of her realisation at what was being done to her by her own son. 'The sheer brutality and ferocity of the attack, which must have lasted some minutes, was akin to torturing her. 'She curled up in a foetal position, trying to protect herself.' The court heard Howe carried out the 'horrifying act' with a 12-inch knife, the tip of which was bent by the force used. Mr Justice Haddon-Cave said: 'She didn’t die immediately. The totality of the wounds caused her to bleed to death. 'A passer-by heard her pleading with you to stop, but you didn’t and left her to die. 'You told Facebook friends you hated your mother, and became hateful towards her. 'Her family and friends are still struggling to understand why you committed this terrible and unnatural act.' The judge said he had been told, in mitigation, that Howe 'spent more and more time dwelling in a fantasy world' that seemed more real than his own. Howe lived with his step-father, Kris Wardle, 51, an HGV driver, and his mother, known as Tina, who worked as a cleaner. Nirmal Shant QC, prosecuting, said the couple noticed he became increasingly withdrawn, spending most of his time in his bedroom and rarely speaking. Miss Shant said: 'He had a history of self-harming and using knives, which they took from his room. 'He’d used knives to cut holes in his bedroom walls and made stab marks in the door and his punch bag was stabbed repeatedly.' Miss Shant said Howe was 'obsessed with Dexter' - a blood spatter pattern analyst for the Miami Police Department who hunts down and kills criminals he believes deserve retribution. He told to a friend in one message that he wished he was Dexter. Miss Shant said Howe had downloaded reports on murder weapons, after searching for 'Dexter’s kill knife' and also searched for 'What does a sociopath need to do to blend seamlessly with society?' The court heard that on the day before the murder, Mr Wardle set off for work, expecting to be away overnight. Howe went to work at a care home before returning home at 3.30pm and going to his room. Mrs Wardle left for her cleaning job at 7.20pm, returning home an hour later. At about 2.30am the next day - Tuesday, July 16 - a next door neighbour heard a woman either screaming or crying. A man passing by heard a female voice saying: 'Oh please, please don’t do it.' When interviewed by police after his arrest, Howe said he could not remember anything. Miss Shant said: 'He says he was in the bathroom covered in blood and when he looked through a gap in the door he could see his mother on the floor covered in blood.' Howe rang his older sister after the killing, asking if he could come to see her, saying he had been in a fight with a man and had badly cut his hand. Having showered, he left the house taking a bag of clothes. He disposed of a blood-stained grey top near a park, then used his mother’s bank card to withdraw £100 from a cashpoint before going to a branch of McDonald’s, in Leicester city centre, to wash his hands. Howe then went to the Leicester care home where he worked and told staff he’d been attacked by his step-father. He left and went to another care home where he also had a job, on the way confessing to his sister, over the phone, that he had killed their mother after an argument about him smoking cannabis. He arrived at the second care home, initially claiming to have been in a fight. The police were called and he was arrested. Miss Shant said Howe’s sister, on hearing her mother had been stabbed, immediately contacted her step-father, who was in Barnsley. He asked his father, Brian Wardle, to go to the house to see what had happened. Miss Shant said: 'When he got into the bedroom he could immediately see she was beyond help. She was dead.' Rosina Cottage QC, mitigating, said Howe had no previous convictions and had a schizoid personality disorder, although he was not suffering from diminished responsibility at the time of the offence. She said there was 'some pre-meditation' involved shortly before he got the knife from the kitchen and took it upstairs. 'His instructions remain that he can’t remember why or how he would have done such a thing, but he acknowledges he must have,' she said. 'He’s emotionally distant, but he does appear to be shocked by the magnitude of the offences and by what he’s done.' After the case, Mr Wardle said in a statement: 'Katrina was my Pole Star, immutable and persistent, always guiding, always shining brightly. 'She was the force that held me to the ground, the force that let me fly free above the world.' Detective Chief Inspector Siobhan Ashford, of Leicestershire Police, who led the investigation, said: 'This incident has destroyed a family and left many people devastated by the events. 'His actions have left ever-lasting consequences and he now faces a life behind bars.' http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2539838/Reclusive-care-home-worker-obsessed-TV-killer-Dexter-stabbed-mother-53-times-left-bleed-death-rowed-cannabis-smoking.html 2 Comments at this time Bongme
  6. Hi Taking reporting to new highs! Moment giggling CNN reporter admits to 'feeling the effects' of legalized marijuana in Colorado By James Nye 15 January 2014 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXW6IeeiQ8g One CNN correspondent took reporting of the legalization of recreational marijuana in Colorado to new highs as she inadvertently felt the effects after a day spent touring the state's dispensaries. Speaking to host Anderson Cooper about her day with 'ganja-preneurs' who are cashing in on the new laws by offering cannabis tours around the state, Randi Kaye admitted that she had felt the effects of a self-proclaimed 'contact high'. Indeed, during her report for the series titled, 'Gone to Pot', Kaye found herself spending the day in the back of a limousine with several people smoking a lot of marijuana - no doubt inhaling the potent drug second-hand in the enclosed space. 'Oh yeah, I wasn’t thinking right, Kaye responded. 'I couldn’t remember even some of the questions that I wanted to ask in the interview, which has never happened to me when I’m reporting in the field.' 'And I found things to be really funny, much funnier than I normally do, so I think we got a little bit of a contact high there,' she added. Asking if she was ever going to come home, Cooper was delighted to see Kaye beg to return home, lest she spend anymore time under the effects of marijuana. Just two weeks into the legalization of marijuana in Colorado 'Adult use' pot is projected to be a $208 million industry in Colorado this year - on top of the $250 million projected to be spent on medical marijuana, Betty Aldworth, deputy director of the National Cannabis Industry Association, told CNN. One business alone, the Lodo Wellness Center in Denver, which is described as a 'boutique' marijuana store that is cash-only, recorded $10,000 in sales in the first few hours of legalization on January 1. While the owners, married couple Donald and Linda Andrews - who started the store in 2000 as a medical marijuana dispensary, foreseeing the substance one day becoming legal - told CNN they made more in one day than they would normally in one month. Although not divulging the figure, the pair said they served about 1,000 customers, with the majority buying an eighth of an ounce, priced between $40 and $50. The estimated total sits around $50,000 for day one. In all, about $1 million in business was done at about 35 pot shops on the first day of marijuana's legalization in Colorado, Aldworth estimated, giving each an average first day earning of $28,000. While that business is unlikely to continue, with people flying in from all over the country, as well as Canada and Australia, to be among the historic first to buy legal weed, pot shop owners are looking to increase their number of plants several-fold. All business must grow their own marijuana, under the laws. All plants are grown indoors, and the law limits to six the number of plants grown under each light fixture. Nationwide, government-regulated marijuana is projected to double this year, to $2.3 billion from about $1 billion last year. That 2013 figure came solely from medical marijuana sales in more than a dozen states. Several states are creating the growth. Colorado and Washington are the first two states with legalized recreational marijuana, and Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada and Oregon will allow medical cannabis shops to open in 2014. Washington's recreational weed will go on sale later this year. Pot promises to be such big business that advocates are planning voter initiatives for legalizing recreational use in several other states by 2016. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2539659/How-stoned-Giggling-CNN-reporter-admits-feeling-effects-days-reporting-legalized-marijuana-Colorado.html 6 Comments at this time Bongme
  7. .Hi Police! Someone's stolen my cannabis plants! 'Naive' grower reports theft of his drugs ... and is promptly arrested .Aaron Chambers shouted for help when men smashed into his home .They had heard about his drug-growing enterprise in West Yorkshire .Police arrived to find his class B drugs in the cellar and arrested him .Chambers, 31, is branded 'ridiculous' and 'daft' at court in Kirklees By Mark Duell 14 January 2014 A 31-year-old man complained to police that his cannabis had been stolen - and found himself arrested for producing the drug, a court heard. Aaron Chambers shouted for help when men armed with baseball bats smashed their way into his home in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, after hearing about his drug-growing enterprise. Police arrived on October 9 last year to find his class B drugs in the cellar and arrested him. At a previous hearing, Chambers was branded ‘ridiculous’ by his own solicitor after shouting to police that his cannabis had been stolen. At his latest appearance, magistrates called him ‘daft’. James Weekes, prosecuting, told Kirklees Magistrates' Court: ‘A member of the public called police saying there was a man shouting for police. 'When they arrived he was in the house and told officers someone had broken into his house and stolen his cannabis. There was a hydroponics growing room in the cellar with six fully grown plants and three smaller ones.’ Mr Weekes said the estimated yield of the drug was 524g, with a potential street value of £4,400. Chambers, now of Slaithwaite, West Yorkshire, admitted a charge of producing the drug. He said he had bought some equipment from a shop on an industrial estate in Slaithwaite. Mr Weekes said: ‘He found out how to grow the drug by word of mouth and by the internet. Google is a remarkable thing. He said “I just enjoy it and I don't have an addiction”.’ Chambers received a similar conviction in 2002 for possession of cannabis, magistrates heard. Mike Sisson-Pell, defending, described his client as ‘naive’ in growing the drug himself. He said: ‘His naivety extends to the fact that he didn't anticipate that people of a more serious criminal nature would find out about his small growing and attempt to steal it. ‘It was with considerable shock and fear he found his address attended by four men trying to smash their way in armed with baseball bats. 'He was in fear that unless he acceded to their demands he would be subjected to a severe beating’. Chairman of the bench Barry Bedford told Chambers: ‘What you've done has been daft.’ He ordered him to complete three months of drug rehabilitation as part of a community order. The seized cannabis will be destroyed and Chambers must pay £85 costs and a £60 victim surcharge. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2539182/Cannabis-grower-reports-theft-drugs-promptly-arrested.html Photos and Add Comments Bongme
  8. Hi Colorado marijuana shops make $28,000 each on the FIRST DAY of legalized pot .Stores reporting $10,000 in sales in first few hours of Colorado's marijuana legalization .'Adult use' pot projected to be a $208 million industry in the state in 2014 .About $1 million made across 35 pot shops in Denver on 'Green Wednesday', January 1, with an average of $28,000 each .Businesses now trying to triple their plant stock to keep up with demand 5 January 2014 Daily Mail It's a bona fide industry that is, officially, only five days old - but represents hundreds of millions of dollars. As Colorado comes close to closing out the first week of its 'green rush', with recreational marijuana stores legally allowed to sell the drug from January 1 under revolutionary new state laws, official sales figures and profit margins have started rolling in. 'Adult use' pot is projected to be a $208 million industry in Colorado this year - on top of the $250 million projected to be spent on medical marijuana, Betty Aldworth, deputy director of the National Cannabis Industry Association, told CNN. One business alone, the Lodo Wellness Center in Denver, which is described as a 'boutique' marijuana store that is cash-only, recorded $10,000 in sales in the first few hours of Wednesday. While the owners, married couple Donald and Linda Andrews - who started the store in 2000 as a medical marijuana dispensary, foreseeing the substance one day becoming legal - told CNN they made more in one day than they would normally in one month. Although not divulging the figure, the pair said they served about 1,000 customers, with the majority buying an eighth of an ounce, priced between $40 and $50. The estimated total sits around $50,000 for day one. In all, about $1 million in business was done at about 35 pot shops on the first day of marijuana's legalization in Colorado, Aldworth estimated, giving each an average first day earning of $28,000. While that business is unlikely to continue, with people flying in from all over the country, as well as Canada and Australia, to be among the historic first to buy legal weed, pot shop owners are looking to increase their number of plants several-fold. All business must grow their own marijuana, under the laws. All plants are grown indoors, and the law limits to six the number of plants grown under each light fixture. The Medicine Man dispensary in Denver, the largest in the state, has 5,000 plants, meaning an operation of over 830 lights, and are looking to triple their plant stock to 15,000. Evergreen Apothecary in Denver served 400 customers on opening day and now plans to increase its plants from 2,000 to as many as 24,000. 'This is unquestionably a tremendous growth industry,' Aldworth said. 'There hasn't been an opportunity like this in American history in quite some time. 'The tech boom had an impact on the American economy, but I think this could rival it. 'We're not creating a market out of nothing. 'We are just shifting it from the underground market.' Nationwide, government-regulated marijuana is projected to double this year, to $2.3 billion from about $1 billion last year. That 2013 figure came solely from medical marijuana sales in more than a dozen states. Several states are creating the growth. Colorado and Washington are the first two states with legalized recreational marijuana, and Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada and Oregon will allow medical cannabis shops to open in 2014. Washington's recreational weed will go on sale later this year. Pot promises to be such big business that advocates are planning voter initiatives for legalizing recreational use in several other states by 2016. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2534164/Owners-Colorados-marijuana-stores-cash-green-rush.html 33 Comments and Photos Bongme