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Found 30 results

  1. I thought it would be nice to share my (I'm not the first to do it) method for making clones without clonex or powder just using Aloe Vera gel. For a while now I've been growing notill organic but still was depending on clonex for rooting clones. Really wanted to get away from using it and after a couple of very successful tries with Aloe I here I am sharing info. Most of this isn't new information and the method used here is gona be Ot1s method. Although this works well with jiffy pellets. I get an abundance of roots showing out of the jiffy after about 8 days, keeping the humidity at 100%. I forget the name of the active ingredient in the aloe that helps in rooting perhaps someone who reads this and knows could let me know and I'll add it to the info, with credit to that person of course I start by soaking the clones in mix of blended aloe gel and water for 24 hours, at this point they are already sliced and trimmed ready to dip into gel and plant. Next I wash a slice of fresh aloe plant and get it ready for dipping, I usually run a knife through the gel to get it nice an gooey Next I take a clone and dip the clones into the gel and get a nice coating on the bottom of the clone. Next I put the clone into a prepared hole in a mix of soil which has 35% perlite. (it's less than the 50% in the original method, but I try to use as little as possible this is the only stage I add it to my grow) I put 4 per pot Finally the pot gets bagged and tagged I'll take the bags off in aprox 12 days to check on them by that point most if not all of them will have nice roots. This is an oldtimes clone I took 8 days ago just been planted into some soil with a sprinkle of covercrop seed. She's a little pale but in a few days she'll be looking great and ready for more light. Unfortuneately I planted her before I grabbed the camera so I don't have a pic of her roots but I'll post the roots of the ones I took today once they are finished. I always have aloe plants around I use a mix of water and aloe gel, and alga as a foliar feed so this method of cloning comes at little extra cost and is as natural as it comes. I hope someone may find this interesting I found a few vids of youtube about it and it really interested me.
  2. Anyone tried cloning an auto? If so how did it turn out. I might give it a go even if it doesn't produce big plants it's still free lol.
  3. KayDog's Follies - Cloning Being able to make successful cuttings - or cloning - is one of the most useful skills you can acquire in growing your plants. It is also known as a method Asexual Propagation (there are several methods). With skill and care, you can enjoy your favourite plant for a long time - very cheaply. A suitable plant to take the cuttings from is called the Donor or Mother Plant. ('Mother' because this plant will be female - as it is buds you want. You could take cuttings of Male Plants equally if you wished.) There are as many ways to take cuttings as there are growers. It took a while for me to find my technique and I'm pleased to share it with you, here. Don't be disheartened if your attempts fail; just try another way an you will find one that works for you. Cutting has a valuable asset a seed cannot give you. Time. Flowering depends on a certain extent of the age of the plant. A Donor plant will have spent time growing to that stage. That 'age' is carried on with the cutting you take. This is why it is possible to put a cutting into 12/12 Flower once the roots have firmly established. However, I like to wait until there are 6 sets of true leaves before I start flowering. However - no matter how you do it - cleanliness and working quickly is utterly vital to your success. Here's what I do: 1-2 I have an old electric heated propagator with no control other than on and off. Despite the permanent marks on the base, I am certain it is scrupulously clean. During the cleaning, I can check the lid, base, flex and plug. 3-4 A single layer of expanded clay pebbles in the propagator base reduces the trouble heat spots cause. Later, when I add 100ml of water, the base heat will spread out in the water, evaporate that water and give life-support to the cutting. Having a tight-fitting cell tray also means your plugs will be more secure, not fall over - and as the roots grow, keep them from the light. 5 Select your Donor Plant. Sometimes we don't have a choice about the plant we want to take cuttings from. Where possible, it should be the most healthy specimen you can get with the bud qualities you want. I believe it also helps giving the Donor Plant a good watering a few hours before cutting. This will fill the stems and leaves with water during its most vulnerable period. 6 Now get your Knife, Cloning Gel and Root Media ready. For years I've used bare razor blades but a bad cut has shown me why a scalpel is better. I've used all kinds of rooting hormone and found the powders to be the worst and gel to be so much better. I prefer the Rooting Gel from the Grow Shops because they are fresher simply due to the high turnover compared to other Garden shops. Lots of people don't use a rooting hormone so you might want to experiment to see what works for you. 7 I'm not a fan of popcorn bud and so stems from the base are my first choice of cuttings. The energy that small bud would have had can now go elsewhere in the plant. 8 This is that basal cutting: it happens to have 3 parts. The top two are viable for cuttings while the bottom one has been discarded. 9 I've trimmed the excess leaves and stem away. I've also lightly scraped the bottom of the stem on one side only to wound that area to help encourage rooting. 10 I put that cutting immediately into some rooting gel. Some people like to pour a small amount of gel into a shot-glass and keep the bottle pristine. The remains in the shot glass would then be thrown away. I'm happy to use a brand new, fresh bottle and then use the remainder for the back garden. I like to leave the cutting for at least 30 seconds and up to its first node. The reality is I will take another cutting while that one is sitting in the bottle. 11 Now we can prepare the Root Plug.I'm using Root!t for the first time as I'm curious to see if this will help my efforts. I'm hoping it will be cleaner and quicker. 12a/b The pre-made hole in the Root Plug is not as great as it might seem. Sometimes that hole is too big and the cut-stem simply flops around in it. I like the cut-stem to be firmly gripped by the hole. So I use a chopstick to extend that hole a little further down, nearly to the bottom. I've shown the depth in 12b. To help, I place my fingers at the required depth on the chopstick and then push. When my fingers touch the Root Plug I know I'm at the right depth. 13a This is the cutting in the premade hole with no prodding about. It is too loose and likely to fail. 13b This is the same Root Plug but with the chopstick extending the hole and the gap on top closed up with a piece of Root!t sponge pinched off and plugged in the hole. The cutting is now firm and snug. 14a/b/c Another example of a cutting. In 14b we see the two pieces to the left and some bottom stem being discarded. In 14c we see the cutting in the Root Plug as it should be. The dirt is left on the knife to show you the stem has been scraped a little to help with rooting. The knife will be cleaned in between each cutting. Some people do a quick wipe while others use a form of alcohol. 15 I like to place the cuttings so fewest leaves touch each other. I also sprtiz each cutting on the leaf-underside to allow the stomata to take in water while the cutting is at its most vulnerable state. The glass shows 100ml of water which will be tipped into the propagator base to spread the heat and to allow water evaporation for the stomata to take in water in its gas form. Later, this can be seen to be working when you see condensate on the propagator lid. I'm trying to keep the humidity high - around 80-90%. I don't give the cuttings any nutrients at all and any dry Root Plugs are given water from within the propagator. 16 The Propagator lid is replaced and the light switched on. The lid vents are also closed to minimise water-loss. I will leave this setup for at least 7 days before taking the lid off again to have a look for roots every day afterwards. When roots appear the cuttings are placed in a Vegging Tent to harden off. Discard any unhealthy or dead cuttings immediately. Your cuttings are likely to look sad for a period and then pick up - so don't be too quick to throw them away! After 3 weeks, I bin any that are left and not rooted and clean my setup again for the next time. 17a/b Shows my last efforts in cuttings about 14 days ago. These were done in pure coco. A healthy root system can be seen and these will be put into their final pots very soon to begin its life producing beautiful, sweet bud! Stay Safe.
  4. From the album KayDog's Follies

    17a/b Shows my last efforts in cuttings about 14 days ago. These were done in pure coco. A healthy root system can be seen and these will be put into their final pots very soon to begin its life producing beautiful, sweet bud! Stay Safe.

    © uk420

  5. From the album KayDog's Follies

    16 The Propagator lid is replaced and the light switched on. The lid vents are also closed to minimise water-loss. I will leave this setup for at least 7 days before taking the lid off again to have a look for roots every day afterwards. When roots appear the cuttings are placed in a Vegging Tent to harden off. Discard any unhealthy or dead cuttings immediately. Your cuttings are likely to look sad for a period and then pick up - so don't be too quick to throw them away! After 3 weeks, I bin any that are left and not rooted and clean my setup again for the next time.

    © uk420

  6. From the album KayDog's Follies

    15 I like to place the cuttings so fewest leaves touch each other. I also sprtiz each cutting on the leaf-underside to allow the stomata to take in water while the cutting is at its most vulnerable state. The glass shows 100ml of water which will be tipped into the propagator base to spread the heat and to allow water evaporation for the stomata to take in water in its gas form. Later, this can be seen to be working when you see condensate on the propagator lid. I'm trying to keep the humidity high - around 80-90%. I don't give the cuttings any nutrients at all and any dry Root Plugs are given water from within the propagator.

    © uk420

  7. From the album KayDog's Follies

    14a/b/c Another example of a cutting. In 14b we see the two pieces to the left and some bottom stem being discarded. In 14c we see the cutting in the Root Plug as it should be. The dirt is left on the knife to show you the stem has been scraped a little to help with rooting. The knife will be cleaned in between each cutting. Some people do a quick wipe while others use a form of alcohol.

    © uk420

  8. From the album KayDog's Follies

    14a/b/c Another example of a cutting. In 14b we see the two pieces to the left and some bottom stem being discarded. In 14c we see the cutting in the Root Plug as it should be. The dirt is left on the knife to show you the stem has been scraped a little to help with rooting. The knife will be cleaned in between each cutting. Some people do a quick wipe while others use a form of alcohol.
  9. From the album KayDog's Follies

    14a/b/c Another example of a cutting. In 14b we see the two pieces to the left and some bottom stem being discarded. In 14c we see the cutting in the Root Plug as it should be. The dirt is left on the knife to show you the stem has been scraped a little to help with rooting. The knife will be cleaned in between each cutting. Some people do a quick wipe while others use a form of alcohol.

    © uk420

  10. From the album KayDog's Follies

    13b This is the same Root Plug but with the chopstick extending the hole and the gap on top closed up with a piece of Root!t sponge pinched off and plugged in the hole. The cutting is now firm and snug.

    © uk420

  11. From the album KayDog's Follies

    13a This is the cutting in the premade hole with no prodding about. It is too loose and likely to fail.

    © uk420

  12. From the album KayDog's Follies

    12a/b The pre-made hole in the Root Plug is not as great as it might seem. Sometimes that hole is too big and the cut-stem simply flops around in it. I like the cut-stem to be firmly gripped by the hole. So I use a chopstick to extend that hole a little further down, nearly to the bottom. I've shown the depth in 12b. To help, I place my fingers at the required depth on the chopstick and then push. When my fingers touch the Root Plug I know I'm at the right depth.

    © uk420

  13. From the album KayDog's Follies

    12a/b The pre-made hole in the Root Plug is not as great as it might seem. Sometimes that hole is too big and the cut-stem simply flops around in it. I like the cut-stem to be firmly gripped by the hole. So I use a chopstick to extend that hole a little further down, nearly to the bottom. I've shown the depth in 12b. To help, I place my fingers at the required depth on the chopstick and then push. When my fingers touch the Root Plug I know I'm at the right depth.
  14. From the album KayDog's Follies

    11 Now we can prepare the Root Plug.I'm using Root!t for the first time as I'm curious to see if this will help my efforts. I'm hoping it will be cleaner and quicker.

    © uk420

  15. From the album KayDog's Follies

    10 I put that cutting immediately into some rooting gel. Some people like to pour a small amount of gel into a shot-glass and keep the bottle pristine. The remains in the shot glass would then be thrown away. I'm happy to use a brand new, fresh bottle and then use the remainder for the back garden. I like to leave the cutting for at least 30 seconds and up to its first node. The reality is I will take another cutting while that one is sitting in the bottle.

    © uk420

  16. From the album KayDog's Follies

    9 I've trimmed the excess leaves and stem away. I've also lightly scraped the bottom of the stem on one side only to wound that area to help encourage rooting.

    © uk420

  17. From the album KayDog's Follies

    8 This is that basal cutting: it happens to have 3 parts. The top two are viable for cuttings while the bottom one has been discarded.

    © uk420

  18. From the album KayDog's Follies

    7 I'm not a fan of popcorn bud and so stems from the base are my first choice of cuttings. The energy that small bud would have had can now go elsewhere in the plant.

    © uk420

  19. From the album KayDog's Follies

    6 Now get your Knife, Cloning Gel and Root Media ready. For years I've used bare razor blades but a bad cut has shown me why a scalpel is better. I've used all kinds of rooting hormone and found the powders to be the worst and gel to be so much better. I prefer the Rooting Gel from the Grow Shops because they are fresher simply due to the high turnover compared to other Garden shops. Lots of people don't use a rooting hormone so you might want to experiment to see what works for you.

    © uk420

  20. From the album KayDog's Follies

    5 Select your Donor Plant. Sometimes we don't have a choice about the plant we want to take cuttings from. Where possible, it should be the most healthy specimen you can get with the bud qualities you want. I believe it also helps giving the Donor Plant a good watering a few hours before cutting. This will fill the stems and leaves with water during its most vulnerable period.

    © uk420

  21. From the album KayDog's Follies

    3-4 A single layer of expanded clay pebbles in the propagator base reduces the trouble heat spots cause. Later, when I add 100ml of water, the base heat will spread out in the water, evaporate that water and give life-support to the cutting. Having a tight-fitting cell tray also means your plugs will be more secure, not fall over - and as the roots grow, keep them from the light.
  22. From the album KayDog's Follies

    3-4 A single layer of expanded clay pebbles in the propagator base reduces the trouble heat spots cause. Later, when I add 100ml of water, the base heat will spread out in the water, evaporate that water and give life-support to the cutting. Having a tight-fitting cell tray also means your plugs will be more secure, not fall over - and as the roots grow, keep them from the light.
  23. From the album KayDog's Follies

    1-2 I have an old electric heated propagator with no control other than on and off. Despite the permanent marks on the base, I am certain it is scrupulously clean. During the cleaning, I can check the lid, base, flex and plug.

    © uk420

  24. From the album KayDog's Follies

    1-2 I have an old electric heated propagator with no control other than on and off. Despite the permanent marks on the base, I am certain it is scrupulously clean. During the cleaning, I can check the lid, base, flex and plug.

    © uk420

  25. So this is a Thread designed for anyone that's testing or working on any outdoor seeds INDOORS. It's all about the Outdoors anyway, right? I myself got some cheese in the making, been hunting down phenos, testing high RH and very low cold snaps through the day & night. Doing a few more projects, Wild 3 to hunt for the CPPheno "Mother" Funki cheeses to find the Lemon Cheese Pheno "Mother" Cheese Round 2. Gonna be a good season, still got 10wks+ to do this. Fav 1 Blue Cheese "smelly feet pheno" More to come later on. So is anyone else doing something like this? SW