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Breeding

Creating your own strains

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  • Posts

    • Simple Jack
      Does Marijuana Legalization Lead To More Problematic Weed Use?   Marijuana legalization increased marijuana use and cannabis use disorder among older adults, a new study finds.   While the benefits of marijuana legalization are aplenty, it’s also important to consider the possible consequences as well. According to a new study, not only does legalization lead to increased cannabis use, it increases the rate of cannabis users who develop addictive behaviors. The study highlights the possible public health consequences to legalization, so that regulators and lawmakers can create proper policies to prevent them. “Although occasional marijuana use is not associated with substantial problems, long-term, heavy use is linked to psychological and physical health concerns, lower educational attainment, decline in social class, unemployment, and motor vehicle crashes,” researchers wrote in the study published in JAMA Psychiatry. For the study, lead author Magdalena Cerdá, a drug policy expert at New York University, and her team analyzed data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2008-2016). The survey divided age groups between those between 12 to 17 (teenagers), 18 to 25 (young adults), and 26 years or older (older adults). The researchers then looked at how marijuana legalization affected whether participants used cannabis in the past month, and if they met the NSDUH’s definition for cannabis use disorder (their criteria include problematic use to addiction). Where the sharpest rises in marijuana use occurred was for older adults, when comparing those in legal states vs. those in non-legal states. Among the age group, cannabis use in the past month jumped from 5.65% to 7.1%, frequent use rose from 2.13% to 2.62%, and cannabis use disorder recorded in the past year changed from 0.9% to 1.23%. However, the young adult group had no significant changes in marijuana consumption behaviors. While researchers found an increased risk of cannabis use disorder among teenagers, it was a relatively minor adjustment. “For adolescents, I think we need to take the findings with a grain of salt,” Cerdá told Vox. “We need to really track changes among adolescents over a longer period of time and across other states that are legalizing to see if that’s really a robust finding or it’s actually due to some other third factor.” As Vox adds, the researchers took special care in checking their findings against possible limitations. That included analyzing whether marijuana use was already increasing prior to legalization, if demographic or socioeconomic changes had any effect, or if other variables could be influencing their results. The researchers took several steps to validate their results. They looked at both demographic and socioeconomic changes to see if they had any effect; they checked to see if marijuana use had already been on the rise in states that eventually legalized cannabis;  and they conducted statistical sensitivity analyses to try to account for other variables that they may have missed. But ultimately, because the data used comes from self-reporting participants, it’s always difficult to draw definitive conclusion from the research. What Cerdá emphasized, though, is that she and her team don’t believe their study should stop any possible marijuana legalization. Instead they want their research to influence how states develop regulations and frameworks around legalization. As she told Vox, legal drugs remain available despite their negative effects. Tobacco results in 480,000 to 540,000 deaths each year while drinking in excess is connected to 88,000 annual deaths. For marijuana, we should “start to think about ways to legalize that prevent those unintended consequences, just like we would regulate tobacco and alcohol,” Cerdá said. “[Because legalization] has a lot of important benefits from a criminal justice standpoint, and I think it could, if done well, have benefits from a public health standpoint,” she added. “If it’s well-regulated, we could regulate the quality of the product, we could regulate the potency of the product — in a way we couldn’t if it were illegal.” https://thefreshtoast.com/cannabis/does-marijuana-legalization-lead-to-more-problematic-weed-use/
    • tokenroll
    • Simple Jack
      Bristol gets first medical cannabis centre Anyone can book a consultation Bristol's first medical cannabis centre has launched in Redland. The MyAccess service in Redland Court Road's May Wellness Centre is only the second medical cannabis clinic in the UK to get a licence, which the CQC announced last night (November 13). The Government legalised medical cannabis last November and now the May Wellness Centre can start assessing patients with conditions such as chronic pain, PTSD, anxiety and depression. Anyone can book a consultation at the clinic. If a patient is found to be suitable for a prescription, they can pick it up from pharmacies such as Boots, which would place an order from a wholesaler. Initial consultations costing £150 are now available at the clinic. Follow-up consultations cost £50. Leila Simpson, deputy CEO of the United Patients Alliance, said: “The CQC’s decision is incredibly significant in providing real hope to thousands of families trying to access medical cannabis for their loved ones. "Patients have remained frustrated by the slow uptake of prescriptions in both the NHS and private sector, and we call on the Government to urgently increase the speed of access to these vital medicines with uninterrupted supply based on patient need.” 'Over the moon' Bruce is a 45-year-old army veteran who has a long history of Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (CPTSD). The Devon resident hopes he will be eligible for medical cannabis at the clinic. He said: “I’m over the moon by this exciting news. For years I’ve been desperately trying to access medical cannabis for my CPTSD and the thought of now being safely prescribed in Bristol fills me with excitement.” Graham Woodward, clinical director at MyAccess, said: “We’re delighted to have received our CQC registration, which I’m confident will be a turning point for patients who have so far been unable to access medical cannabis. "I hope this brings renewed hope for the reported 1.4 million people in the UK using ‘street cannabis’ to treat their chronic health conditions that a legitimately sourced, high quality medical cannabis alternative is available." The CQC licence means patients can be prescribed in the Bristol clinic, but it also allows MyAccess specialists to provide home care services for those too unwell to travel.     Dr Oscar D’Agnone, consultant psychiatrist with MyAccess, said: “I’ve seen the transformative benefits of medical cannabis first-hand and I am really pleased to be able to start assessing patients in a CQC-registered clinic." If you would like to find out more, visit www.myaccessclinics.co.uk.   https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bristol-news/bristol-gets-first-medical-cannabis-3538510  
    • Hugh Jass
      To be honest I''m not that impressed with Brighton, it's more of a shopping place for us. I would carry on up the coast to Worthing, it's a got a small pier, some nice places to eat and drink and is quite up and coming. It has changed from what it used to be. If you like walking there is the Cissbury ring, and chancerbury ring to stoll around, giving wonderful views of the local coutryside. The Cissbury ring even has wild horses at the top. I would then head over to a small village called Steyning in the afternoon and go into the tea rooms opposite the only roundabout, cup of tea and a slice of cake and wander around the village.   If you want to walk the promenade in Worthing park up at the sea lane cafe and walk to the coast cafe, eat at the coast cafe, the food is ok but the atmosphere is great, they even have a DJ there at weekends. It would be a nice morning or a afternnon walk or even take the bicycle if you want.       Whitby is good fun, I would avoid the Goth weekends there though, it gets busy. There are lots of cute shops and the abby ruins to walk around. It can look a bit desolate at times, which I wonder was the inspiration for Bram Stoker, because he wrote Dracula there. Oh and take the steam tain bus thingy, it's only a couple of quid and is great fun young and old alike. too toot!